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Full text of "Coast Seamen's Journal (Sept.16,1914-Sept.8,1915)"

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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT 

SEPTEMBER 16, 1914— SEPTEMBER 8, 1915 



All editorial matter is designated by an 
terisk (*). 

Title No. 

A 

"Absent Voters" Bill * 4 

About A "Glorious Victory" * 47 

About "Gangsters" * 38 

About "Good Wages," Etc. * 20 

About "Our Flag" * 49 

Advance in Needle Trade 19 

Advantages of High Dues 24 

Adventures of a "College Bye"*.. 2 

Afraid of the Truth!* ..........; 39 

Agitators, About * 2 

Agitator, About the * 17 

"Alabama," Predecessor of the "Emden" 37 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List.. 19 

Alaska's Opening 43 

Alaska's Trade 37 

Alaska Waters, Dangerous 25 

Aliens in the United States 2 

American Federation of Labor — 

Convention Call 2 

The Philadelphia Convention* 9 

Seamen's Delegates Report on 34th 

Annual Convention 12 

A. F. of L. to Build Home 13 

A Review of Achievements 14 

University of Pa. Checks Free Speech. 

(Gompers's Invitation Vetoed) 28 

Exhibit at Panama-Pacific Int. Expo- 

tion 28-6; 32-3; 

Gompers Scores "Uplifters" 45 

American "Homes"? 50 

Analysis of Pending Shipping Legisla- 
tion (by Rufus Hardy) 24 

Appreciation of Rufus Hardy, An 40 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Annual Report by U. .S. Board of 

Mediation 18 

Wages Reduced by Judge. 20 

No Compulsory Arbitration 21 

Wages-By-Law Don't Work 22 

"Argonaut, The," Dissected 38 

Argument, An Unscientific * 46 

Arizona Anti-Alien Labor Law Uncon- 
stitutional 18 

Arkansas Minimum Wage Law Uncon- 
stitutional 51 

Armor Plate Monopoly, The (by Clyde 

H. Tavenner) 36 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Australia and the Japs * 2 

The Yellow Peril ("The Seaman")... 4 

Another Jap Eulogy* , 18 

Anti-Jap Legislation 20 

Chinese or Japanese Crews? 22 

Our Thoughtful Professors * 24 

Japan and China 28 

Chinese Crews 29 

The Case of the Japs (by Wm. Bon- 

sor) 29 

That "Dollar" Protest . . . .- 30 

Aggressive Japan * 31 

Japanese Whalers 36 

Misplaced Sarcasm * 37 

Distribution of Asiatics in U. S 37 

Asiatics In Canada 38 

Japanese Fishing Monopoly at Van- 
couver 38 

Chinese Crews, "Efficiency" of* 38 

Submarines and Chinese * 38 

Japanese Immigration 39 

Misstating the Facts .' 43 

Japanese Living Abroad 50 

"Prisoners of the Sea" * 51 

Atlantic, Toll of the 17 

At the Gate 3 

Auction of War Prizes 21 



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Title No. Page 

Australian Seamen, Etc. — 

Australia and the Japs* 2 7 

Australia on the War 2 9 

Labor Governs Australia* 5 6 

Marine Cooks' Wages 6 6 

For a "White Australia"* 8 6 

Judge "Suspends" Wage Board De- 
cision 20 3 

Perverted Patriotism * 25 6 

A Transcendental Error 27 2 

Inspired Patriotism 28 11 

A Matter of Principle* 29 7 

"A Paradise for Lawyers" 33 3 

Australia's Labor Press 37 10 

Compulsory Voting Tried 46 10 

Tipping Abolished by Arbitration 

Court* 51 6 

B 

Barges, Light Draft 52 11 

Benevolence of Mr. Ford 31 9 

Benevolent Despotism 39 2 

Beware, Ye Land Sharks 10 2 

Bird Refuges 2 9 

Boycotting vs. Blacklisting* 21 6 

British Ambassador to Vatican Appointed 20 15 

British Censorship 52 8 

British Columbia Bounties 41 11 

British Labor Daily Suspended* 52 6 

British Seamen's Union Cares for Ger- 
man Members 29 8 

Bullen, Frank T., Death of ; . . 27 13 

Burial at Sea 47 9 

Buryeson, F. H., Comment by — 

One Man's Views 

2-11; 4-11; 6-9; 8-11; 16-11; 18-11; 20-11 

Is Socialism Inevitable? 9 7 

Looking Astern 10 6 

The Eight-Hour Day 11 6 

State-Owned Ships 11 7 

Business Man's Referendum 49 1 

"Business" Referendum, A* 44 6 

Business vs. Humanity * 50 7 

C 

California's Assessed Value of Property 24 13 
California Canned Fruit Production for 

1914 19 13 

California Convict Labor Law* 34 7 

California's Crude Oil Production for 

1914 24 13 

California Election Returns (Governor 

and U. S. Senator) 19 13 

California Forests 1 8 

California's Geographic Diversity 36 2 

California Immigration Commission's 

Report .. 23 13 

California Legislature, Report on Labor 

Bills 36 10 

California's Metal Production 20 2 

California's Population 50 13 

Canadian Forest Reserves 52 15 

Canadian Lumber for United States 39 11 

Canadian Rules, New 35 2 

Capitalism — Arch Fosterer of War 10 1 

Capitalism and Militarism 41 1 

Carpenters' Fine Record 51 10 

Carpathian Passes, The 45 9 

Casual Laborer, The 21 2 

"Cement Bill" Again* 21 7 

Cement Bill Defeated (in Gal.)* 28 7 

Cement Bill (Double Crosscrs "Ex- 
plain") 29 10 

Cement Bill Killed in Oregon 26 11 

Cement Mills Closed 26 8 

Child Labor, A Brief Against •<Addi:ess; '.";■ 

by Paul Scharrenberg) . . . f . , ..'.,.'. .:. . ..' 38 •", iC< 



I Title No. Page 

Child Labor Is Measured 11 10 

Chinese (see Asiatics) 

Chinese Building Ships for U. S 36 9 

Chronicle's Cartoon, The* 47 7 

Cigarmakers and Stogiemakers Agree... 5 3 

Civilization, Our Bogus 9 1 

"Civil Service" Arrogance* 41 6 

Civil Service, The Tyranny of* 40 6 

"Clear As Mud" ((Throniclc's Editorial 

Logic) * 39 6 

Coal Exports from United States 20 10 

Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Vol. Twenty-eight * 1 6 

Historical Reference to Establishment 

of "Journal" 25 1 

Our Official Journal (by Thos. Han- 
son) 48 6 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 13 7 

Coast and Geodetic Survey, Handbook of 25 11 
Collision, A Disastrous (News vs. Edi- 
torial columns) * 34 6 

Collision With Warships 33 2 

Colorado's Military Debt 2 10 

Colorado, The Shame of* 34 6 

Colorado Miners' Strike, Etc. — 

A Verdict That Surprised No One.... 1 3 

Character Assassins 2 2 

Miners Accept Conciliation 2 7 

President Wilson Bars Strike-breakers 3 3 

Peace Not Wanted 4 9 

Miners Defend Officials 7 3 

Our Kaiser Wants War 8 2 

President Wilson Turned Down 8 2 

Colorado's Strike Ended* 14 7 

Soldiers Called "Brutes" 15 3 

Is Colorado in America?* 15 7 

Chronology of the Colorado War 15 9 

"Dummy" Jurors Selected 18 10 

Colorado Strike Not Lost 19 2 

Lawson Arraigns Rockefeller 23 1 

Hand-Picked Jurors * 37 7 

Lawson Jury "Packed" 38 3 

Lawson Must Be Freed 40 3 

Facts About Colorado Justice 42 1 

Lawson's Memorable Words 46 7 

Command of the Sea, The* 15 7 

Comparison, A * 17 6 

Compensation (see "Workmen's Com- 
pensation"). 

Concentration Camp, An Ideal (British) 37 7 

"Confiscation," About 45 11 

Congress, Record of Sixty-third 31 2 

Construction vs. Destruction 33 8 

Controversy Over Sinking of "William 

P. F^rye" 31 15 

Convict Labor, Results of 29 3 

Convict vs. F"rce Labor* 34 7 

Convict Labor, About * 41 7 

Convict Ship, Last 16 2 

Copper River Region 29 9 

Cossack System Exposed 27 3 

Costly Freight 51 11 

Cost of Operation, The * 41 6 

Cotton Consumption in the United States 51 13 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Seamen's Action for Wages Dismissed 

(Victoria. B. C.) 7 10 

Seamen s Riglit to "Lay"'* 9 6 

Fisherman Recovers Wages (Larsen 

vs. North Alaska Salmon Co.) 23 2 

California .State Railroad Commission 
Given Jurisdiction Over California 

Coastwise Trade 23 5 

:• AiyaVd for Shortage of Provisions 

: \: ("Jiby Somers") 41 5 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURxXAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. 



Title No. Page 

Creating a Merchant Marine* 5 6 

Criminal Carelessness ("Francis H. Lcg- 

gett") * 5 6 

Criticism of Trade Unions 16 1 

Cuba Ferry, The 41 8 

C2arisni at Work ♦ 27 6 

D 

Dalles— Celilo Canal Opened 3S-5; 36-8 

Danish Seamen in May Day Demon- 
stration 39 11 

Deadweight, Meaning of 40 2 

Decoy Ships 46 11 

Delegate, A $20,000 19 8 

Democracy and War * 41 7 

Denmark's New Constitution 42 11 

Denmark. Notes from 6-8; 15-7; 24-2 

"Department of Labor," Secretary Wil- 
son's Address 2 1 

Derelicts, Destroying of .SI 2 

Detectives in Unions 4 8 

Diamonds, Land of (German South- 
west Africa) 35 9 

Disasters (see "Wrecks"). 

Dutch Seamen, Insurance of 35 10 

Dignity of Labor, The * 21 7 

Diplomacy, The Game of* 38 6 

Direct Legislation * 15 6 

Discriminating Duties, Policy of 24 8 

"Disrupted" (Butte Miners' Union) 5 9 

E 

Earth, History of the 35 11 

Earthquake and War 21 11 

Earth, The Dying 1 8 

"Eagle," A Blind* 43 6 

"Eastland" Disaster (see "Wrecks"). 
Economic Determinism (by W'. A. 

Jacobs) 46 11 

Editor's Grievances* 44 7 

Editor Person Acquitted 5 2 

Educating the Workers 18 2 

Education Is a Necessity 43 3 

Efficiency * 44 6 

"Efficiency" of Chinese Crews* 38 6 

Eight-Hour Day Primers 4 2 

Electrical Workers' Dispute Ended 7 10 

"Emden's" Exploits, The 9-15; 

10-8; 18-15; 28-8; 33-11; 38-14; 42-7; 45-15 

Eureka, Cal., Elects Socialist Mayor*.. 45 7 

Evidence of Progress 18 9 

Evil Spirits At Work * 43 6 

Expensive Chartering ("Aquitania") . . . . 46 10 

Exports Carried in U. S. Vessels 39 13 

F 

"Far From the Millennial Era" 19 2 

Farmer and Labor, The (by Edw. P. 

E. Troy) 46 2 

Farmers and the Eight-Hour Day (by 

T. W. Williams) 6 10 

Farms for Jail Inmates 10 10 

Fate of the Downtrodden, The 52 9 

"Fine Clothes," About* 33 7 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Distribution of Fish 5 10 

The Fish F'ood Supply 7 9 

About Whales 14 8 

Salmon Pack for 1914 18 5 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List 19 11 

Exploration of Pacific Coast Halibut 

Grounds 29 5 

Shell Fish Farms 30 2 

Fisheries Suffer From War* 30 7 

Whalers, Japanese 36 8 

Fishing at Vancouver Monopolized 

by Japanese 38 5 

New Halibut Banks 46 9 

Portuguese Fishing Industry 48 8 

Tuna Industry Growing 49 10 

Flags of Commerce Carriers 28 2 

Floating Island in Vermont 48 11 

Florida Sponge Fishery 30 10 

Fog Signals 37 9 

Ford and Suhr — 

New Trial Denied 1 12 

Sign That Petition 10 6 

From 1834 to 1915* 24 6 

Ford's Benevolence 31 9 

Forecastles, Better 29 7 

Forest Reserves in Canada 52 15 

"Freedom" 45 8 

Freedom of Contract (a Judicial Phan- 
tom) 43 9 

Free Employment Bureaus 19-7*; 23-8 

Free Speech, A Defense of (by Prof. E. 

A. Ross) .••.•■■,• 20 1 

French Ships "Missing" 38 9 

Fresh Air Not Needed* 1 7 

From A '/j Soul to A '/i Living 44 8 

Full Crew Law L'pheld * 43 6 

Fundamental Differences* 19 7 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles, Etc., by — 

Furuseth Organizing in East 9 2 

Furuseth on the Job 11 2 

Furuseth's Reioinder 16 7 

Who Is the "Inland Officer"? 22 2 

The Plain Truth, 31 7 

Furuseth and His Work (by Robert 

M. La Follette) 33, . J, 

More Valorous Ignorance .•33: '.'V 

"Creating'' a Condition .* 'j6'. > 7 

Facts Versus Fiction 37 1 

An Interview with Furuseth •, .;-'42^', .^; 

Furuseth Charges Conspiracv V* '.'f^.. 'A 

Lessons of the "Eastland" Tragedyr . t 47 • • 1* 

Just Plain Facts 50 7 



Title No. Page 

G 

"Gagging" of Federal Employes De- 
nounced 9 3 

Gaging Trade-Union Progress 5 1 

Gentleman, A Perfect 43-2,6* 

Germany at Kiau Chau 1 8 

German Line Not Discouraged 37 11 

German Seamen in England 19 8 

German Ships Interned in United States 

Ports 22 11 

"Grandfather Clause" Void 43 11 

Great Lakes — 

Dangers on Great Lakes 21 3 

"Safety and Morals" on Lake Excur- 
sion Boats (Report of Wm. L. 

Bodine) 22 8 

The Michigan Obstructionists 23 10 

Transferring Lake Vessels 47 9 

Lakes Conferences, Those 32 11 

"Green Crews." About * 30 6 

Gunmen, Industrial Rule by 26 8 

H 

Hamburg's Wickedness 33 9 

Hardy, Rufus, An Appreciation of 40 1 

"Hateful, Cowardly, Useless!"* 7 6 

Hatters Refuse to Pay Judgment 39 10 

"Hauling Down the Flag"* 37 6 

Hearst Gem, A * 49 7 

Hearst Nonsense. More 45 10 

Helgoland Englishman, A 34 10 

Historical Facts About U. S. Merchant 

Marine 24 8 

History Repeats Itself* 16 6 

History, Some Ancient (Invasion of 

England) 34 11 

Home Owning and Housing 28 3 

Hoodoo Ship? A (Mackinaw)* 41 6 

Hostile Press, The * 29 6 

Hours of Work, Too Many 38 8 

How Girls Exist, Not Live 15 11 

How Shipping Is Held Up 19 11 

Humane Laws vs. Business 18 10 

Humphrey, Mr. The Nerve of* 47 7 

I 

Iceland's "Hill of the Law" 38 10 

Illness a Tax on W'orkers 41 10 

Immigration, Etc. — 

L^nited States Immigration Figures... 

3-3; 16-3; 23-10; 25-3; 29-3; 39-10; 41-10; 46-3 

Record of Immigration Legislation... 5 10 

To Check Immigration 11 3 

Immigration Tide Shifts 14 10 

Senate Passes Immigration Bill 19 3 

Veto of the Immigration Bill* 22 6 

Opponents of Literacy Test Exposed. 23 3 
Gompers on the Immigration Bill.... 23 10 
First Annual Report of California Im- 
migration Commission 23 13 

Illiterates in the United States 25 13 

Millions of Illiterates 30 10 

Immigration Problem, The 34 1 

Immigrant Ships, Inspection of 34 9 

Incongruity of Unemployment 10 9 

Idle Land Makes Idle Men 10 11 

Industrial Freedom?* 6 6 

Industrial Rule by Gunmen 26 8 

Industrial Unity First* 44 6 

Ingersoll's Political Maxims 14 9 

Injunctions, Government by, Etc. — 

Clayton Bill Passed in Senate 1 3 

Clayton Bill Signed 8 3 

Another Injunction Judge 25 3 

Judge-Made Law and Labor (by Louis 

F. Post) 30 1 

Injunction Refused at Stockton, Cal.. 42 10 

Insurance of Dutch Seamen 35 10 

Insurrectos, The (Manila Sailors' 

Union) * 35 7 

Insidious (?) Methods* 3 6 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Moving to Postpone Action* 2 6 

Another Delay* 1 6 

"Dividends" Still on Top* 7 6 

Report of A. F. of L. Delegates 12 2 

The Last Round in Congress* 13 6 

The President's Message* 14 6 

Status of the Seamen's Bill* 15 6 

Treaty "Joker" Removed 17 3 

Seamen's Bill Advances* 17 6 

Watch the Conference Committee 19 1 

Shipowners' Claims Answered 22 3 

"Safety" Not Wanted (Washington, 

D. C, Times) 24 7 

Seamen's Bill in President's Hands*.. 25 6 

President Approves Seamen's Bill 26 1 

Freedom's Battle Won* 26 6 

To Those Who Have Helped* 26 6 

The Last Argument (by Senator Var- 

daman ) 26 10 

Chronology of Seamen's Bill 27 2 

The La Follette Act (Comparison Be- 
tween Old and New Law) 27 8 

Comment on the La Follette Act 28 1 

Working Out the Details* 28 6 

\"erhntim Reprint of Seamen's Act.. 31-1; 32-1 

' ••Mflrx-hi.^ M ^^V)rk * 32 7 

: ".^.Tie; 'I'N.ble.' S^a^an" Rating * 32 7 

"By Hooke or Crooke" * 32 7 

•; 'The "HowJ.Aeaio^^he Seamen's Law" 32 9 

•; -Thj Re«fson9''V .». .,«." 33 6 

• • *"4'ossible •E-rnlJafrasSments" 34 2 

Comments on the Seamen's Act 34 2 



Title No. Page 

Facts \'ersus Fiction 37 1 

Convention Call 37 2 

Big Business Raps Seamen's Act 43 1 

Analyzing "The Opposition" 43 7 

The Issue! 44-1, 6* 

Public Opinion on the Seamen's Act. 46 1 

The I. S. U. of A. Convention* 46 6 

I. S. U. of A. in Session * 47 6 

A Manly Editorial (N. Y. Globe).... 47 10 

Convention Proceedings 48-1; 49, 2 

Secretary-Treasurer Hanson's Report. 48 7 

Deliberate Misinformation* 48 6 

An Appeal for Fair Play * 48 6 

Secretary Wilson's Address 48 10 

A Business Man's Referendum 49 1 

About "Our Flag" 49 6 

The Convention's Work* 49 6 

Comment on the Seamen's Law 50 1 

Pamphlet on New Seamen's Act*.... 50 7 

Pertinent Facts About "Our Flag".... 51 1 

A Challenge* 51 6 

Mass Meeting at San Francisco* 52 6 

Investigating Wealth * 18 6 

In 1815 25 9 

Isn't It Awful. Mabel? (Dollar's With- 
drawal) * 42 7 

Isolated Islands 46 10 

"I. T. F." Still on Deck 14 10 

I. W. W., Windup of the 33 8 

J-K 

Jaded Appetites 11 9 

Japanese (see Asiatics). 

Jitnev Buses, Report on 29 11 

Joke "or a Yoke? A 50 9 

Judicial Phantom, A 43 9 

Justice? (Henry Siegel) * 17 6 

Justice Wright Resigns 6 3 

"Kanawha's'' Crew, The* 44 7 

Kelp. The Value of 51 8 

Kemper, Louis, Death of 9 3 

Kiel Canal, The 38 8 

Kosmos Line, The 45 8 

L 

Labor and Liquor 39 8 

Labor and the Law (by Graham R. 

Taylor) 39 1 

Labor Crushers Exposed (Stockton 

Lockout) 5 7 

Labor Day at San Francisco 51 7 

Labor for Peace 40 8 

Labor Governs Australia * 5 6 

Labor Is For Humanity* 36 6 

Labor Laws Enacted by 63rd Congress. 31 3 

Labor Legislation 8 8 

Labor Not a Commodity — 

Clayton Bill Passed in Senate 1 3 

A Truth Embedded in Law 2 10 

Clayton Bill Signed 8 3 

Trade-Unions and Anti-Trust Laws 

(by Henry R. Saeger) 11 1 

$252,000 Damages (Hatters' Case)*... 18 6 

Wickersham on the Clayton Act 43 3 

Labor's Record of Achievements 7 1 

Labor Sunday 51 11 

"Labor Union" Sailor, The * 23 6 

Labor Unions and Citizenship* _8 6 

Labor L'nrest, Causes of 52 1 

La Follette, Robert M., An Apprecia- 
tion of 36 1 

La Follette Seamen's Act (see "Int. Sea- 
men's L'nion"). 

Land Grants in India 43 9 

Land Monopoly in California (by E. P. 

E. Troy) 18 8 

Land Monopoly, Result of 43 8 

Lands, L'nused 1 9 

La Salle to New Orleans 42 8 

Law and Order, About 50 8 

Lawsuit, A Twenty-three Year 1 9 

Lawyerless Justice 19 9 

Legislative Program (Cal. State Feder- 
ation of Labor) 18 7 

Legislative Progress of 1914 16 8 

Let Us Have the Facts * 46 7 

Liberty Bell, The * 45 6 

Life on $7.00 a Week 23 8 

Lighthouse Service, The 14-8; 43-2 

Lighthouses to Live In 36 10 

Lives Lost in U. S. Mines .. 16 3 

Lloyd's Register, Construction of Ships. 41 14 

Load Line Needed * 10 6 

Logic of "The Times"* 31 6 

"Log of the El Dorado," The (Captain 

Benson's Book)* 19 6 

Long Sea Voyages ...._. 38 9 

Longshoremen, Protection for, in Hol- 
land 42 8 

Longshoremen Strike at Vancouver *. .28-6; 29-6 

Lower California 3-11; 41-9 

Ludlow — First Anniversary 32 7 

Lumber, Canadian 39 11 

Lunatics. .'Kbout * 24 6 

"Lusitania" and Safety (by E. K. Roden) 46 8 

"I.usitania," The Case of* 35 7 

M 

Macarthur, Walter, Issues Handbook on 

Navigation Laws 23 7 

Mahan, A. F., Admiral, Death of 16 13 

Manless Jobs and Jobless Men* 20 6 

".Manless Land," About* 7 6 

Mans Right to Work (Poem by Edwin 

Markham) 17 2 

.Manufacturing Public Opinion* 42 6 

Men, Not Ships, Rule the Sea 22 9 

Men Who Talk Too Much* 45 6 

Mexican Pearls 30 2 

Mexico. Starvation In 43 2 



178107 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. 



Title 



No. Page 



Millionaires Mites in 1913 2 

Militarism at Home * 4 

Minimum Wage Amendment Opposed.. 8 
Minimum Wage Law for Arkansas Un- 
constitutional 51 

Minimum Wage Legislation 51 

Minnesota Minimum Wage Law Uncon- 
stitutional 20 

Missing French Ships 38 

"Monopoly Methods," About 37 

More About "Our Flag" * 50 

Moving Backward * 33 

"Murder Is Murder" ("Eastland" Dis- 
aster) * 46 

Muzzling the Labor Press * 14 

N 

Naval Reserve, The * 21 

Navigation Laws, Handbook on, by Wal- 
ter Macarthur 2Z 

Navy, Practical Use for 42 

Navy's Enlisted Men 30 

Need for an Army (by Jay Fox) 20 

Neutrals, Right of* 28 

New Declaration of War, A (by Frank 

P. Walsh) 27 

New York, Arrivals, in 1914 26 

Nome, Stay Away From 35 

Non-Unionists, A Word to* 31 

Norway's Capital 1 



Ocean Freights 52 

Ocean Travel at Low Level 33 

"Of Blue Blooded Origin" 42 

Ohio Miners' Strike Ends 37 

Oil Reserved for U. S. Government.... 49 

Old Age Pensions Favored 16 

Old Lighthouses 4 

One Day of Rest in Seven 41 

Open-Shop, The 45 

Opposition to "Taylor System'" Ap- 
proved 7 

Organization is Labor's Hope 4 

Oriental Logic * 19 

Orient, Our Trade to* 51 

Otis Must Pay Damages 49 

Our Over-Conservative Congress (by F. 

R. Wall) 13 

"Outside Agitators," About* 30 

Oyster Business, The 42 



Pacific Coast Waterfront Employer 

Federation ♦ 23 

Pacific Mail Company, The * 36 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co., Sale of Ori- 
ental Fleet 50 

Pamphlet on New Seamen's Act* 50 

Panama Canal — 

The Canal and the Future 3 

First Sailing Vessel Through Canal... 17 

Shipments Through the Canal 25 

Panama Canal Earnings ^7 

Panama Canal Distances 35 

Panama Canal Business 45 

Panama and Suez 52 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition — 

Opened on Time, Feb. 20 24 

Tribute to "Fair" Builders * 25 

A. F. of L. Exhibit 28-6; 32-3; 

United States Lighthouse Exhibit.... 40 

Paternalism, About* 26 

Patriotism and Persecution 7 

Patriotism, Perverted * 25 

"Peace at Any Price"* 20 

Pearl Harbor Dredging Completed 46 

Pearling Fleet, The 43 

Pearls of Wisdom * 35 

Peasant and King (Poem by Christo- 
pher Morley) 22 

Peonage in Textile Mill 27 

Pennsylvania Railroad, The 30 

Percentage of Workers Organized 4 

Perry's Victory Centennial 41 

Pertinent Facts About "Our Flag" 51 

Police, New Duty for * 23 

Population of Germany and France.... 16 
Porto Ricans Maltreated 30 

Portraits: 

Andrew Furuseth 33 

Senator Robert M. La Follette 36 

William B. Wilson 38 

Rufus Hardy 40 

Wilson-Lincoln 48 

Postal Savings System, Growth in .... 19 

"Practical Men" * 43 

Pribilof Islands, The ._ 36 

"Prisoners of the Sea" * 51 

Prize Contest, A Suggested 35 

Probing Industrial Unrest 15 

Problem of Poverty, The 5 

Professor Again, The * 16 

Progress in Organizing * 45 

Progress of a Decade (by Herman 

Jochade) 

Prohibition Vote in Colorado 

Protest Against War, A 

Przemysl, Why Is? (by W. J. B. 

Mackay) 44 

Public Safety Hearings in Cal 2 

Q-R 

Question, An Unanswerable 12 

Questionable Test, A (Christopher Co- 
lumbus) ♦ 51 

Radical, About the * 19 

Radicals, Who Are the?* 33 

Raiding a "Relief Fund" * 14 

Rat Plague, Facts About 41 



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Title No. Page 

Reactionaries, About * 43 7 

Reasons for Intervention (in Mexico).. 44 11 

Recognition of "Labor" 33 9 

Referendum by U. S. Chamber of Com- 
merce * 44 6 

Remarkable Trial, A 13 2 

Revolutionary Phrases (by Wm. Z. 

Foster) 15 8 

Reward of Labor, The (by Allen L. 

Benson) 12 1 

Right to Capture, The 7 7 

Rickmers Line, The 3 10 

Right to Quit, The* 39 6 

River Traffic in the U. S 29 2 

Robertson's Certificate 52 8 

Rockefeller Arraigned by Lawson 23 1 

Rockefeller's Responsibility * 35 6 

Rockefeller's Defense 35 8 

Rockefeller. Jr., on the Grill 39 3 

"Romance" of the Sea 18 9 

Roosevelt — The Jingo!* 46 6 

Royalty, Peace and War 9 8 

Rubbing It In * 1 6 



Safety and the Public * 27 

Safety and the Seamen's Act (by Stan- 
ton H. King) 45 

Sailors' Snug Harbor , 2 

Salt, Volume of. In Ocean 39 

Sciilors' Union of the Pacific — 

Delegate's Report (Cal. State Federa- 
tion of Labor) 6 

Delegate's Report (Oregon State Fed- 
eration of Labor 22 

Thirty Years of Progress 25 

Historical Sketch of Union 25 

Thirty Years Young* 25 

Some "Ancient History" 25 

First Ten Years of Union's Life 25 

Message from Senator La Follette.... 26 

The 6th of March Celebration * 26 

Resolutions of Appreciation for Sen- 
ator La Follette 28 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Acorn, Alfred 41 

Allen, August 5 

Ammundsen, Carl L 19 

Anders, Fred A 3 

Andersen, Victor Anders 31 

Arnecke, Carl 10 

Baardsen, Edward Martin 46 

Baker, Charles 6 

Bengtsen, Lars 39 

Brady, John 6 

Burnstad, Thomas F 45 

Cain, Louis 8 

Carry, John 3 

Duhig, Maurice 17 

Erickson, Arthur 37 

Erickson, Eric 4 

Farrel, Stephen E 14 

Feeley, Thomas 20 

Gundersen, Thomas B iZ 

Halpin, Joseph 12 

Halstein, Franz Rudolph 20 

Halvorsen, William 3 

Hansen, Bernhard 2Z 

Harlow, J. K 9 

Heisterman, Harry....... 46 

Helenius, Johan Julius 9 

Hennig, Robert Emil 14 

Hewitt, Samuel 46 

Hoisether, Sigfrid Gerard 16 

Holten, Charles Edward 44 

Hustede, Heinrich 23 

Jackson, Edmund 6 

Jacobsen, Anders 23 

Johanesen, Lauritz Bernard 4 

Johansen, Anton 3 

Johanson, John H 21 

Johnson, John 4 

Johnson, Gustaf 23 

Johnson, John Konrad 40 

Jordfald, Theodore 3 

Kollgren, Arvid 5 

Kramer, Carl Henri 4 

Kuhme, Wilhelm 10 

Lehtonen, Victor 8 

Lepsoe, Oscar A 35 

Lind, Edward 30 

LindelofT, Gustaf Carl 3 

Lindberg, August 34 

Lindgren, John M 17 

Madscn, Martin Julius 3 

Maro, Carl Johan 4 

McCourt, Joseph 52 

McManus, John 50 

Middlcton, William 17 

Moe, James H 

Morris, Thomas Stanley 6 

Nagel, Karl Friedrich 3 

Nelson, John 40 

Nilson, Carl A 35 

Noble, Archibold 18 

Nordstrom, Edward T 12 

Nylund, Carl Edward 15 

Olsen, Karsten Johan 10 

Olsen, Olaf Marius 4 

Olson, Olaf 4 

O'Reilly, Cornelius 50 

Paulson, Anton S 8 

Peterson, Otto 38 

Rasnuissen, Rrynjulf S. G. F 33 

Reese, William Emil 12 

Reiner, John 12 

Reynolds, Frank C 8 

Robertson, William 16 

Ross. William 14 

.Sandlicrg, John Victor t>2 



Title No. Page 

Sellers, William 3 7 

Sepp, John 35 7 

Soad, Max SO 7 

Soderman, Carl Johan 3 7 

Stack, Jacob 14 7 

Strand, Olaf Johannes 30 7 

Sullivan, Michael 35 7 

Svane, Hans Albert H 23 7 

Svensen, John 45 7 

Swanson, Ben 11 7 

Swensson, Theodore Herman 42 7 

Torgersen, Kasper 10 7 

Tupitz, Conrad 9 7 

Ullman, Gustaf 42 7 

Wahlstedt, Albert 4 7 

Williams, Hugh 6 7 

Williams, M. Edward 14 7 

Wilson, Harry 10 7 

San Frjincisco — 

Exposition, See Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position. 
Foreign-born Voters on the Great 

Register 20 13 

A Deserved Tribute (by Mayor 

Rolph) * 25 7 

New Labor Temple Completed 26 6 

Earnings of Municipal Street Railway 43 13 
Arrivals and Departures of Vessels 

and Tonnage 44 5 

Labor Day Celebration * 52 7 

Sanitary Investigations 52 11 

Scab's Conversion to Unionism, A 18 1 

Sandinavian Seamen Confer 18 2 

School, Keeping Boys at* 52 7 

Schwerin's Chinese Dictionary* 40 7 

Schwcrin's Ideal Crew * 34 7 

Schwerin, Poor Old 41 2 

Science Blighted by War 5 3 

Seamen's Act, A Verbatim Reprint ... .31-1 ; 32-1 
Seamen's Act of March 4, 1915 (see Int. 

Seamen's Union). 
Seamen's Bill (see "International Sea- 
men's Union of America"). 
Seamen Shipped in United Kingdom, 

1914 25 4 

Seaweeds, Edible 27 11 

Self Help, The Power of* 29 6 

Sermon, A Reconstructed* 20 7 

Sex of the Insane 40 2 

Shackleton's Transantarctic Expedition.. 5 15 

Shipbuilding of 1914 27 8 

Shipbuilding in the United States 45 2 

Shipowners' Conspiracy, The (by Robert 

M. La Follette) 47 2 

Ship Purchase Bill, The 24-1; 51-6* 

Shipwrecks (see "Wrecks"). 

Single Tax, The H 2 

Sixty-third Congress, The 27 7 

Skunk Furs, Trade in 1 11 

"Society News," About* 22 6 

"Speeding Up" Produces Insanity 42 3 

Spreading Rockefeller Ideas* 40 6 

Spreckels, Rudolph, Answers R. P. 

Schwerin 23 6, 7 

"Square Deal," A (Captain Dollar's 

Complairit) * .....39 6 

Standard Oil Does Not P^y Living 

Wage 52 3 

Sarvation Produced by Law 9 11 

Steamboat Inspection Service (Annual 

Report) 15 10 

Steamboat Inspection Service is Blamed 

for "Eastland" Disaster 51 10 

Stockton (Cal.) Labor War Ended*.... 16 6 

"Stop Watch" to be Abolished 22 10 

Strike Against Peonage 19 10 

Submarines and Chinese* 38 7 

Submarine Loss, Our First 32 11 

Submarine, In the. Off Kinsale 37 8 

Submarine Motion Pictures 30 8 

Survival of the Fit * 3 6 

Swedisli IMimsoll Law, A (by Charles 

Lindley) 14 2 

Switzerland, In 35 8 

T 

Taft Congratulates Gompers 2-8; 5-2; 9-2 

Taft Sings Old Song 40 3 

Tax on Labor Saving Devices 6 1 

Teachers May Organize 10 3 

Three Hundred Feet Under the Sea.... 34 8 

Third Degree, The * 19 6 

"Tied to the Ship" 45 7 

"Tij)ping," The Curse of* 20 7 

'loll of the North Atlantic 17 8 

To Non-Union Seamen* 33 6 

Trade-Unions, Weak Spots in 34 3 

Trade Unionist Defends Illiteracy Test 20 10 

Tribute to Furuseth, A * 31 6 

Tribute to Labor 4 2 

Troubles of a Muleteer* 30 6 

Troubles of Mr. Schwerin* 27 6 

Tuberculosis, Fighting 25 9 

Tuberculosis. What Is It? 30 11 

Tuberculosis, Tlic Cost of 44 9 

Turtle Hunting 35 9 

Twentieth Century loke, A (The 1. W. 

W.'s) 40 9 

Tyson on the Rampage* 13 6 

Unemployed Women in California 21 3 

Unemploynu-nt Insurance 20 3 

Unemployment in New York 36 13 

Unemployment, Responsibility for .... 17 1 

Unemployment Statistics 22 8 

"Unfair Competition," About* 35 6 

Unionism, the Power of (by Robert 

Hunter) 33 11 

Union Crew Wins Races* 40 7 

l^nion or Non-Union Shop?* 8 7 

I'liions, I'owcr of 29 9. 



COAST SEAMEX-S JOURNAL IXI)EX-V( )LU.ME TWEXTY-EIGHT. 



Title 



U-V 



No. Page 



Union vs. Non-Union Sentiment 22 1 

United States Board of Mediation (An- 
nual Report) 18 12 

United States Coal Exports..... 20 10 

United States Coast Guard Service 21 10 

United States Commerce in 1914 38 2 

United States Commis.sion on Industrial 

Relations Report 50-6;* 52-1 

United States Exports for Fiscal Year 

Ending June 30, 1915 51 13 

United States Export Trade Unparal- 
leled 45 13 

United States Fleet, Additions to 23 11 

United States Hydrographic Office 37 2 

United States Income Tax.... 45 13 

United States Life Saving Service, Re- 
port for Fiscal Year 23 14 

United States Lighthouse Exhibit 40 2 

United States Merchant Fleet Grows... 19 11 
United States Merchant Marine, His- 
torical Facts 24 8 

L'nited States Merchant Marine, The*.. 52 6 
United States Protest Against Seizure of 

American Seaman * 19 6 

L'nited States Protest Heeded (Interned 

Seamen Released) 31 10 

L'nited States Public Lands Available.. 51 13 

L'nited States River Traffic 29 2 

United States Shipbuilding 45 2 

United States Ships at Rotterdam 25 2 

United States Treasury, Deficit In 44 13 

University Extension 11 2 

Values of Vessels, Change In 47 2 

\'ancouver Longshoremen Strike* 

.27-7; 28-6; 29-6 

\'anishing of Capitalist Unionism (by 

Samuel Gompers) 8 1 

\"crsatile Willie Hearst 5 9 

X'oice From the Depth, A 36 2 

\*oice. The Same Old (S. F. Chamber 

of Commerce)* 50 6 

Voyages, Long Sea 38 9 

W 

Wages by Law Made "Paradise for 

Lawyers" 33 3 

Wages vs. Efficiency * 40 6 

Walsh, What Ails 39 11 

"Wanted — Men!" (poem by Luke North) 33 11 

War, European — 

Labor's Internationalism on Trial 1 1 

An Army Surgeon's Work....; 1 2 

Increase in Naval Strength 1 8 

Can't Draft U. S. Citizens 1 10 

What Haase Said 1 11 

World's Peace Foreseen 2 3 

Blood and Iron 2 8 

War and the Interests of Labor (by 

Alvin S. Johnson) 3 1 

Unpaid War Bills 3 7 

John Burns, Anti-Militarist 4 2 

Victor Hugo's Prophecy 4 6 

An English View of the War 5 8 

Surrender of Antwerp 5 15 

The Rancor of War 7 8 

The Holy (') War.... 8 9 

Running a War in Pajamas 14 9 

Battle Oflf Falkland Islands.....-^ 14 15 

Germans Bombard East Coast of 

England 15 15 

"Reasons" for the War 17 8 

The Good-Fellowship of War 21 8 

On the Brink of Eternity 21 9 

Belgium's Misery ; 21 11 

Battle Oflf Helgoland ,.: 22 15' 

Perverted Patriotism * 25 6 

War's Toll of Shipping 25 11 

"Prinz Eitel Friedrich" Arrives at 

Newport News 27-14; 29-11 

War's Deluded Victims (poem by W. 

N. Ewer) 28 8 

English Workers Defended 30 3 

Behind the Firing Line 30 9 

War Prizes. Sale of 30 11 

Europe's Only Salvation 31 8 

War Increases Wages 31 10 

Fighting Without Hate 31 11 

"To a Finish" 34 11 



No. Page 
. 35 11 



Title 

England and Germany 

The Lust of Battle (Italy's entry into 

the War) * 37 6 

An Ideal Concentration Camp 37 7 

The "Lusitania" Torpedoed 35-7; 36-6 

The Wireless "Did It" 37 11 

Italy In the War 38 9 

Horrors L'pon Horrors * 39 7 

Financing the War 42 2 

Accident Policies Canceled 44 11 

The Real War Makers 46 2 

The "Tall" Liars 46 10 

The Greatest Waste of War 47 8 

The First Year of the War 49 11 

Distances in War 49 10 

War Losses in Ships 50 2 

War and Chivalry 51 9 

Fraternity in Warfare 17 2 

A Startling Review 52 7 

War and Bravery 20 2 

War and Cheap Labor 12 10 

War Trust, The World-Wide (by Clyde 

H. Tavenner) 

35-8; 39-8; 40-8; 41-2; 43-8; 45-2 

Washington Unionists Use Referendum. 37 3 

Watchful Waiting 13-7* 10 

Wendell Phillips's Advice 45 9 

What Ails Our Merchant Marine (by 

Rufus Hardy) 24 1 

What Proofreaders Know 9 11 

When a Boat Is Not a Boat 41 8 

When Financiers Disagree* 25 6 

Where Experts Disagree (Cement Dust)* 22 7 

Who Are the Radicals?* 33 6 

Who Shall Command the Sea? (by 

Nehemiah Boynton, D. D.) 40 11 

Why Do Men Organize? (by C. O. 

Young) 21 1 

Wilson, W^m. B., Address at San Fran- 
cisco 48 10 

Wilson, Wm. B., Man Among Men 38 1 

Women, Equal Pay for 52 3 

Women's Wages in Ohio 46 3 

Working Girls, How They Live 39 9 

Workmen's Compensation, Etc. — 

The (Cal.) State Insurance Fund 6 10 

Compensation Legislation 8 8 

Liability Law Broadened 10 3 

"Safety First" Conference 18 11 

Accidents Can be Prevented 19 10 

Ohio Compensation Law Extended... 9 10 

Compensation for Seamen 30 10 

Colorado Compensation Law Passed.. 34 10 

Accident Prevention Best 35 3 

State Insurance 40 9 

State Insurance Fund a Success in 

New York .43 10 

California Compensation Law Consti- 
tutional 48 13 

Theory of Compensation 50 10 

"Workers Cannot Stop Advancing" (by 

Samuel Gompers) 1 10 

W'orkers' "Net Earnings" (by Prof. 

Scott Nearing) 35 1 

\\'ould Government-Owned Vessels Have 

Coolie Crews? 22 2 



Wrecks — 

War Losses in Ships 

Ships Sunk by German Cruiser "Em- 
den" 

Ships Sunk by German Cruiser "Prinz 
Eitcl Friedrich" 

Wrecks on Waters of V. S. (for fiscal 
year) 

Wrecks in Alaska Waters 

Wrecks (from the "Titanic" to the 
"Empress of Ireland") 

.Admiral Sampson (Findings of Marine 
Inspectors) 

Admiral Watson 

Aggi 35 

Aguila 

Alice M. Lawrence 

Aline Woermann 

Amstel 

Anne de Bretagne 



7 5 

52 5 

-5; 36-5 

32 14 



18 


14 


25 


14 


32 


14 


21 


9 



Title No. Page 

Anita 42 14 

Arabic 51-2; 52-8 

Armenian 43 15 

Asama 22 5 

Bellevue 21 9 

Bowes Castle 6 14 

Candidate 38 5 

Carib 26 15 

Carthage 44 15 

Caucasian 47 14 

Centurion 38 5 

Charcas 15 14 

Cheslie 14 14 

Chester 22-15; 26-14 

City of Richmond 44 14 

Claremont 38 5 

Colon 24 5 

Columbian 3 14 

Conway Castle 28 15 

Coos Bay 16 5 

Curacoa 37 5 

Curie 17 15 

Dalgonar 41 5 

Delhi 27 5 

Denver 32 14 

Desabla 45 14 

Dixiana 44 15 

Drummuir 16 5 

"ICastland" Disaster, The 

46-1, 6;* 47-1, 7; 50-8; 51-10 

"Eastland" Horror Pictures 51 9 

El Dorado* 19 6 

Eleonore Woermann 23 14 

Elizabeth Palmer 28 14 

Elsinore 7 5 

Engelhorn 34 5 

Eureka 18-5; 22-5 

Evelvn 26 15 

F-4 (U. S. Submarine) 29 5 

Francis H. Leggett. ...... .2-5; 3-5, 6; 5-6; 6-5 

Guadeloupe 28 15 

Gulflight 36 11 

Hanalei 12-5,6; 13-1: 18-5 

Hardy 45 5 

Harold Blekum 29 5 

Hemisphere 24 15 

Herald 33 14 

Highland Brae 24 15 

Indian Prince 6 11 

Inkum 44 15 

Inglemoor 47 14 

Julia Luckenbach 35 14 

Karlsruhe 42 8 

Karluk 2-5; 20-5 

La Correntina 17 14 

L. A. Plummer 31 14 

Leelanaw 47 14 

Lurline 19 5 

Lusitania 35-7;* 36-6* 

Malakka 16-5; 18-5; 19-6; 41-5 

Medea 32 14 

Monroe (Skipper Exonerated) 8 14 

Mont Agel 21 9 

Montmaguy 2 14 

Navarra 28 14 

Nebraska 39 10 

Nile 20 14 

Oakland 15 5 

Oceanic 8 14 

Pilgrim 22 14 

Potaro 24 15 

Prins Maurits 32 13 

Randolph 35 5 

Rochelle 7 5 

Royal Edward 51 11 

Santa Clara 46 14 

Santa Rosa 32 5 

Sea Call 50 10 

S. T. Alexander 6 5 

Sumatra 24 15 

Tahoma 14 5 

Union 21 9 

Vaaren 15 15 

Valentine 17 14 

Vine Branch 16 14 

Wakiva 20-15; 24-14 

Warren Adams 18 14 

Washingtonian-Elizabeth Palmer 23 14 

Wilfred 24 15 

William P. Frye 27 14 




■^^V!.^:^. -gry^:s:^r-,K x^^^,v.:cTag^gs;asa|:5^^j^;g^ 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVIII, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1914. 



Whole No. 2295. 



LABOR'S INTERNATIONALISM ON TRIAL. 



Class Consciousness and Solidarity Tested by the War of Nations. 



A tinge of disappointment is apparent in an 
editorial in the London Times on War and 
Class War which followed another on Waning 
Hopes, while war was being declared. The 
Times inquired where the Socialists of Ger- 
many, France, Belgium and Britain are, now 
that "the artificial conflict," which they with 
other parties and factions represent, are tested 
by "the touch of a real one." For fifty years, 
the editorial reminds us, "we have been told 
that the united voice of the 'workers' will for- 
bid war, and strenuous efforts have been made 
to put some substance into the promise. A 
universal strike on the advent or approach of 
war has been proposed and much discussed as 
an effectual means of frustrating it." 

To this reminder the Times significantly adds, 
"if the plan had been earnestly entertained by 
wage-earners, it must have exercised a great 
and deciding influence." 

The Elusive "Solidarity of Labor." 

But to the contrary, the Socialists must be 
as surprised, as all other divided groups are, 
at the amazing spectacle of this fratricidal 
strife. German Social Democrats in one army 
are fighting the Socialists of France, Belgium, 
and England in the army of the allies. The 
question is a fair one which the Times raises, 
"Where is the class-conscious solidarity of la- 
bor?" However, it is only fair to remember 
that the same question arises at the sight of 
Christians in a life and death struggle against 
Christians, Protestants against Protestants, 
Catholics against Catholics, the Holy Orthodox, 
against the Holy Orthodox, in the same irra- 
tional struggle. 

There are reasons for doubting as too hasty 
the conclusion of the Times that "the class 
war of Socialism and the international peace 
movement associated with it, have evaporated 
and are in process of collapsing altogether." 
The onset of this war was too sudden and 
severe for anything to withstand. The German 
Socialists indeed proved to be no exception. 

The same night on which martial law was 
proclaimed throughout Germany, their 79 news- 
papers were suppressed, their clubs and unions 
were not permitted to have another meeting 
and some of their members were summarily 
shot for continuing to protest against war. In 
France the foremost Socialist, Jaures, was killed 
by a fanatical French patriot who justified his 
murderous deed by claiming to have rendered 
France a service in removing the man who, 
in his consistent stand for international peace, 
opposed the measure for the three years of mili- 
tary service. The assassin at his arrest cried, 
"Jaures was an enemy of the three-year law. 
He was an enemy of my country. I have done 
my duty." Although the deed was repudiated 
by everyone, most of all by the government, 
yet, the assassin's bullet at least rang out the 
warning to everything and everyone standing in 
the way of this fierce reassertion of nation- 
alism. 

In the face of this rising tide of passion and 
the far more perilous military repression, the 
German Social Democrats held meetings and 
made public demonstrations in protest against 



the impending war at Weimar, Stuttgart, Strass- 
burg and Berlin, until "a state of war" and 
martial law were proclaimed. To be sure, 
they did not court martyrdom as did the early 
Christians in their stand against the Caesars; 
neither did the heirs of those martyrs professing 
to follow the Prince of Peace, in any of the 
warring nations. On the contrary, the Socialists 
certainly became opportunists, as did the ad- 
herents of every other outstanding cause or sect, 
party or faction. 

The French are led to war by a premier 
who had been a leader in the Socialist party, 
upon whose arm the widow of the murdered 
Jaures leaned as she followed her husband's 
body to the grave. Another Socialist leader, 
M. Herve, who had even advised French sol- 
diers to desert in case of war, himself applied 
to enlist under the colors. The Confederation 
Generale du Travail, corresponding to the 
American Federation of Labor, issued an ap- 
peal to all trade unionists to join in the defense 
of France. All these apparently self-stultifying 
attitudes and actions are exienuated by their 
hope that the war will break up the German 
monarchy and thus be the first step toward 
"the United States of Europe." 

M. Vandervelde, the scholarly yet popular 
Socialist leader in Belgium, at the violation of 
the neutrality of his country by the German 
invasion, consented to serve in the ministry 
of the clerical and conservative party which 
he had always opposed. The New Statesman 
declares that "all the peace parties of Ger- 
many collapsed before the specter of the Rus- 
sian peril, just as German aggression (for 
which the Russian peril is the excuse if not the 
justification) has frustrated all efforts of pacifist 
elements in the countries bordering on the 
western German frontier." 

Kropotkin Loyal to His People. 

Even Peter Kropotkin, exiled prince of Rus- 
sia, from his refuge in England declares his 
loyalty to his people in their war, which has 
already brought from the autocracy assurances 
of more liberty to Poland and Finland and to 
the Zemstvos throughout the Empire. 

There was a temporary split in the British 
Parliamentary Labor Party over the war issue. 
They, with the trade unionists and other more 
radical groups, had written, spoken and taken 
action against Britain's engaging in the im- 
pending war. 

A great meeting of protest was held in Trafal- 
gar Square the Sunday before England declared 
war against Germany. It was attended by many 
thousands of working people, some five thou- 
sand Socialists and trade unionists marching 
from the East End, carrying the red banner 
of the National Transport Workers' Federation. 
There were some minor interruptions by a group 
bearing the union jack, which, however, were 
quickly and quietly repressed by the police. 

During the meeting a Russian, a German, a 
I'^enchman and a Swiss embraced each other 
and stood with joined hands while the crowd 
cheered. The resolutions adopted called upon 
the citizens of London to express "their deep- 
est detestation of the international war that 



seems to be on the point of breaking out, and 
upon the workers to unite to prevent their re- 
spective governments from engaging in war." 

The British Socialist Party issued a manifesto 
to the workers of Great Britain, declaring that 
"it is not a war of peoples," that "the workers 
of Germany declared vehemently against war," 
that "never again must we entrust our foreign 
affairs to secret diplomacy," and that "only an 
agreement between the peoples of France, Ger- 
many and Great Britain will be solid guarantee 
of peace and a powerful bulwark against the 
encroachments of Russian despotism, a result 
which may easily come of the present war." 

After war had been declared, however, all 
these groups decided to discontinue opposition 
to the government's foreign policy and con- 
centrate their eiifort to assure government pro- 
tection and care for the wage workers against 
the rising cost of living, unemployment, and 
destitution from which they would otherwise 
surely suffer as a consequence of the war. 
British Leaders Oppose War. 

Not agreeing with the attitude thus taken, 
J. Ramsay JMacdonald resigned his chairman- 
ship of the Parliamentary Labor Party. Action 
was deferred for two weeks in the hope that 
the resignation might be withdrawn. Joim 
Burns also resigned as head of the local gov- 
ernment board in the cabinet, when Lord Mor- 
ley and C. T. Trevelyan also withdrew on ac- 
count of their opposition to the war. Burns'.s 
resignation was received with no protest and 
surprisingly little comment, especially in labor 
circles. 

The Daily Herald, which George Lansbury 
edits in the interests of industrial unionism, 
contiimes its protest against the war, although 
in somewhat modified form, since it actually 
began. Just before the declaration, in an 
editorial entitled, Down with the War, it alluded 
to the much talk and many resolutions in 
recent years about the international solidarity 
of labor. 

"If the protest against war is to be made ef- 
fective," it declared, "those workers who have 
in their power the control of transport and 
communication must refuse to allow them to 
be used for an end which will cause untold 
human suffering. They must strike against war. 
Tiie labor leaders must act at once. There is 
given to the worker the opportunity to strike 
a blow at the very heart of the capitalist sys- 
tem. The weapon stands ready to the work- 
ers' hand. May they dare to be wise." 

Acting on this or similar advice the Welsh 
miners at Cardiff refused unanimously to accede 
to the request of the British admiralty that 
two holidays be curtailed in order to mine 
coal urgently needed for the navy. In so doing 
they justified themselves thus: "We do not 
consider it necessary for defensive purposes to 
ask the miners to work on these two holidays, 
and we decline to encourage, or in any way 
countenance, the policy of active intervention 
of this country in the present European conflict. 
Further, that as the International Miners' Con- 
gress has, at its meetings, adopted a resolu- 
tion condemnatory of war between the nations 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



represented, we think the present moment is 
opportune for the miners of Europe to make 
an endeavor to enforce their views upon the 
governments implicated in the conflict and the 
pending complications." 

This action caused excitement in Parliament. 
A ministerial party member declared in the 
House of Commons: "If those men had acted 
in that way in Germany, they would have been 
taken out and shot forthwith. What was the 
government going to do in a case of this kind? 
The Socialist Federation was a body which had 
passed a resolution saying that all war was 
wrong and urging it.s members to take the 
necessary steps to prevent the government from 
getting coal. They might be right or wrong 
in their standpoint, but it was a proposition 
the state could not admit for a moment and the 
state should take some action against those who 
incited the miners not to go to work." 

Dr. McNamara, speaking for the Ministry, 
said: ''There was no occasion to give rise to 
uncalled-for apprehension. A great many of 
the men did go to work and all are at work 
now." 

War Adjusts Wage Disputes. 

Subsequently, the IMiners' Federation in South 
Wales decided that all existing questions, in- 
cluding those relating to non-unionism, should 
be dropped, and declared that they were willing 
to work at any time, day or night. The Scot- 
tish coal mine owners informed their miners 
that in view of the existing condition, they 
would not proceed with their claim for a 
reduction in wages. In line with this subordina- 
tion of all dilTercnces to the national defense, 
almost all pending disputes have been settled 
or dropped by the London building trades, the 
marine engineers, electricians, boilermakers, ship 
repairers, and even the transport and dockers' 
unions. Lists of these settlements are printed 
and editorially emphasized in the London 
papers. 

Jean Jaures, at the Congress of the Socialist 
Party in France, the month before he died, 
faced the demand that his party should sup- 
port the general strike, as the most efficacious 
of ail means of preventing war, at the Inter- 
national Socialist Congress which was to have 
been held soon at Vienna. In a remarkable 
oration he admitted that a strike could be 
efTective only if genuinely spontaneous and 
effectively simultaneous in all countries; but he 
prophetically added that it would not avail where 
or when nationality was at stake. 

In a striking editorial, indicative of the change 
in its tone of discussion, the radical Daily 
Herald, quoted above, thus finely applies Wil- 
liam James's urgency of a "moral equivalent 
for war": 

"Cannot we still have an army, equipped not 
for death but for life? Cannot we fight, not 
each other, but our common foe — nature? Can- 
not we thus preserve in the inmost fiber of the 
people that morale we would not have stag- 
nate? 

"It is not difficult to find that moral equiva- 
lent. It lies in the creation of a civic sense. 
We must engender a hatred of the errors of 
our civilization, a hatred so bitter and com- 
pelling tliat men will not endure wrong because 
they would regard it as sin. We want to take 
that pride the soldier feels in the possession 
of his gun, that erect posture of body and soul 
which can be seen as the outcome of his 
training, and substitute for it a pride in the 
tools of labor, be they the miner's pick, the 
surgeon's knife, or the weaver's loom." 

Meanwhile, at the call of their home lands, 
workers all over the world are laying down 
their tools to go back to their mother coun- 
tries and take up arms to kill each other. 
Surely, for the time being at least, their "class- 
consciousness" is superseded by their national 
loyalty, and yet before this war is over, or as 
a result of it, national loyalty may be subordi- 
nated to the supremacy of race-consciousness. 
But beyond all wars, behind the clouds and 
darkness, above the valley of the shadow of 
death there still shines the fixed star of un- 
dying hope — "the parliament of man, the federa- 
tion of the world." — Graham Taylor, in "The 
Survey." 



AN ARMY SURGEON'S WORK. 



The German army in Brussels levied a tax 
of $40,000,000 on the people, and at once 
there arose loud protests. To pay out all 
that money and get nothing for it seems out- 
rageous to them. Rut is there a city in the 
Ignited States of the size of Brussels that is 
not levied on every year for a similar con- 
tribution? Not by a foreign enemy, Oh, no! 
But by land monopolists, franchise monopo- 
lists, and other holders of predatory privi- 
leges. But economically there is not the 
slightest difference between the enforced levy 
of a foreign enemy and a levy by individual 
m.onopolists, with the aid and sanction of the 
home government. American cities may well 
sympathize with Brussels. 



Few of the men who had practical ex- 
perience as military surgeons in the Civil 
War are left. While hundreds of volumes 
have been written on the military opera- 
tions of the armies, North and South, there 
is but little record of the personal experi- 
ences of surgeons in either army or of 
their personal recollections, whether on the 
field or in the military hospitals. For this 
reason the article by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell 
of Philadelphia on "The Medical Depart- 
ment in the Civil War," recently published 
in The Journal of the American Medical 
Association, is of great interest. This 
paper was one of the last written by Dr. 
Mitchell before his death. In it he de- 
scribes, with the charm of the novelist and 
the accuracy of the scientific man, the ex- 
periences of the army surgeons of 1861-65. 
Little record has been left by the thousands 
of medical men who gave their services 
and often their lives for the relief of the 
sick and wounded. Yet their experiences 
were, in many cases, as thrilling as those 
of the soldiers on the firing-line. Under 
the plan of organization followed at that 
time, each regiment had one assistant stir- 
geon, who gave immediate care to the 
wounded in action. When, as sometimes 
happened, the location selected for the, 
dressing-station came under fire, the sur- 
geon moved his patients farther back. Dr. 
John S. Billings operated under fire back 
of Round Top at Gettysburg, and at his 
next move had again to retire under a rain 
of bullets. In some cases this was not 
possible, and it often happened that sur- 
geons stood for hours at the operating- 
table with bullets flying over and around 
them. "In one case that I knew of," said 
Dr. Mitchell, "a patient on the operating- 
table was killed by a bullet while his 
wounds were being dressed." The num- 
ber of wounded men needing care after a 
great battle is entirely beyond our com- 
prehension to-day. In the three days' 
fighting at Gettysburg over twenty-seven 
thousand wounded men, Union and Con- 
federate, w-ere left on the field. All of these 
men were cared for and their wounds 
dressed and the men under shelter inside 
of twenty-four hours after the close of the 
three days' battle. By way of contrast, 
Dr. Mitchell said that it was ten days after 
ihe battle of Waterloo before all the 
wounded had been cared for. In the Wil- 
derness campaign, eighty-three hundred 
men were cared for in two days. One 
hears in novels and sometimes in histories 
of bayonet charges. Dr. Mitchell said, "I 
never saw a bayonet wound, and of twenty- 
five thousand wounds in Grant's battles, 
there were in all fourteen bayonet wounds ; 
there were probably as many men severely 
kicked by mules." The demands on the 
surgeons were heavy. Surgeons dressed 
wounds and did the most serious opera- 
tions until they fainted beside the operat- 
ing-table, or fell asleep at their work. One 
surgeon has a record of thirty-six hours' 
continuous operating and dressing of in- 
jured men. At Gettysburg thirteen sur- 
geons in the Union Army were killed or 
wounded. During the war fifty-one army 
surgeons were killed, four died in prison, 
and two hundred and eighty-one died of 
diseases contracted in the service. The 
entire country, North and South, was well- 



nigh stripped of surgeons to supply the de- 
mands of the Army. Out of one hundred 
and sevent_v-four members of the College, 
of Physicians of Philadelphia in 1864, one 
liundred and thirty of them had seen serv- 
ice in some form in the medical depart- 
ments of the Army and Navy. 



NORWAY'S CAPITAL. 



The capital of Norway was founded in 
1624 by the Dano-Norwegian, King Christian 
IV., who named it Christiania. For more 
than 175 years the development of the city 
was a very slow one. Socially there were 
marked extremes. The refinement of the 
higher circles was in sharp contrast to that 
of the general population. 

That the events of 1814 brought about 
quite a change in the condition of the city, 
one reads in an article in the special Nor- 
wegian supplement which the London Times 
has published in honor of the centenary 
of the Norwegian constitution. From being 
a local town of secondary importance, as 
long as Copenhagen was the joint capital of 
the Dano-Norwegian monarchy, Christiania 
became the capital of modern Norway, the 
center of the government, the seat of the 
Storting, the high court of justice, and the 
university, the latter having been founded 
in 1811. 

All this contributed to give Christiania 
a very conspicuous position, but for a num- 
ber of years progress was on a very limited 
scale, and there are people at Christiania 
who can remember the days when the popu- 
lation of the city, which is now some 255,- 
000, had not yet reached the figure of 40,000. 

The turning point in the history of Chris- 
tiania may be put at the latter half of the 
'SOs. Before that time the town had all 
the characteristic features of a provincial 
place. Since then she has actually developed 
into a modern business town on a European 
scale. Perhaps the greatest achievement of 
Christiania is the extensive port arrange- 
inents for the accoiumotlation of the ever- 
increasing fleet of passenger steamers and 
carriers passing in and out all the year round. 

During the same period Christiania, which 
before 1905 was the railway center of the 
country, has had her connections further en- 
larged by the opening of a number of other 
lines, among which is the popular Bergen 
railway across the mountains to the capital 
of west Norway. 

Unlike Bergen, Trondhjem and several 
other Norwegian towns, Christiania has no 
trade or industry which can properly be called 
her own. She may rather be described as 
collecting within her limits all the various 
trades and manufactures of the country just 
as she is absorbing an ever-increasing popu- 
lation at a rate which is shown by the fact 
that every tenth person in Norway is an in- 
habitant of Christiania. 



For carrying additional baggage on auto- 
mobiles, an Englishman has invented a 
trailer, to be attached to the back corners 
of a car and supported by a single wheel 
at its rear. 



To increase the usefulness of refrigera- 
tors, there have been invented shelves 
made of tubing to catch and circulate the 
water flowing from the melting ice. 



Paris has about HS residents to the acre 
to London's 50. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Labor Not a Commodity. 

Late Wednesday afternoon (Sept. 2), by 
a vote of 47 to 17, the United States Sen- 
ate passed the Clayton bill, previously 
adopted by the House. The Senate made 
several amendments, and declared in the 
clearest language possible for labor's con- 
tention that there is a difference between 
l)ersons and things. 

By a unanimous vote it was agreed to 
amend the bill to read: "The labor of a 
human being is not a commodity or article 
of commerce." 

This is a complete indorsement of the 
workers' position and has been the con- 
tention of the A. F. of L. ever since the 
Sherman anti-trust law was enacted, near- 
ly a quarter of a century ago. 

The House provision dealing with pick- 
eting was stricken out by the Senate Com- 
mittee with the understanding that it 
would permit a trespass. It was rein- 
serted in the bill on motion of Senator 
Cummins on the Senate floor with the con- 
sent of the Senate Committee, in an al- 
tered form, which permits workers to be 
at any place where they have a lawful 
right to be. 

Both branches of the national legislature 
agree that nothing in the anti-trust law 
shall be construed to forbid the existence 
and operation of labor, agricultural or hor- 
ticultural organizations, nor can these or- 
ganizations or members be held to be il- 
legal combinations or conspiracies in re- 
straint of trade under the anti-trust laws. 

To emphasize their views on the (|ues- 
tion of labor's rights, the Senate adds: 
"Nor shall any of the acts specified in this 
paragraph be considered or held to be vio- 
lations of any law of the United States." 

The bill marks the end of so-called "la- 
bor injunctions," which have been issued 
on the theory that if workers quit their 
employment or induce others to quit, they 
can be restrained, because such action "in- 
jures property." 

No injunction shall be issued in a labor 
dispute unless necessary to prevent irrep- 
arable injury, for which there is no ade- 
quate remedy at law. This is the posi- 
tion of the American Federation of Labor. 

As these features of the bill have been 
agreed to by the House, it is safe to as- 
sume that the long struggle of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor for human liberty 
is nearing its triumphant end, and the 
political policy of the trade union move- 
ment has received its most pronounced in- 
dorsement. 



A Verdict That Surprised No One. 

Will those people who are surprised be- 
cause the report of the militiamen's kan- 
garoo court-martial exonerates all the mili- 
tiamen please stand up and be counted? 

What : None of you rise to your feet ; 
none of you are surprised? Well, neither 
are we ! 

In fact, the Free Press all along pre- 
dicted just what would be the outcome of 
this silly farce. The court-martial cost 
something like $20,000, and the expense is 
still piling up because many of the de- 
fendants and witnesses are still being 



housed in Denver's best hotels at State ex- 
pense. But what is a little matter of 
$20,000 among friends, especially when it 
is only taxpayers' money? 

And you know the militiamen are all 
friends. They have all been tarred with 
the same stick. They must all stand to 
it and protect the other crook and thug 
so that they, too, may be protected in their 
own day of stress. 

According to the kangaroo court's re- 
port the horrors of Ludlow were wholly 
justified from the militiaman's standpoint. 
It is perfectly proper for men, armed to 
the teeth and backed by machine guns, to 
attack, shoot, burn and suffocate helpless 
women and children. 

The militiaman has said as much in his 
report and the fact that no one is sur- 
prised shows that no one expected anything 
else from the militiaman, and incidentally 
proves that he has fallen pretty low and 
cuts an infinitesimal figure in the affairs of 
Colorado. 

The militiaman also discovered that 
Lieutenant Linderfelt, another so-called 
militiaman but really a 44-caliber thug and 
gunman, was quite justified in breaking his 
rifle butt over the head of Louis Tikas on 
that terrible day when Ludlow went up in 
flame and smoke and the militiaman went 
down in dishonor and disgrace. 

Tikas, the report holds, applied some 
name to Linderfelt, angering the doughty 
gun wielder. But if Louis called Linder- 
felt anything which Linderfelt is not, then 
the dead Greek must have discovered some 
word which died with him, for that name 
or word is not known to the living. 

Of course the report does not deal with 
the brutal and wanton murder of Tikas 
and others after they were taken prisoners 
or the application to them of the fugitive 
law, a barbarous custom that would shock 
the finer sensibilities of a Fiji Islander, 
but which seems to suit the Colorado mili- 
tiaman very well, especially when he hap- 
pens to be the one who is applying the 
savage code. 

The report was never intended to 
handle such small things as deliberate 
murder. It was only expected to cope 
with mighty subjects such as where a 
prisoner had the hardihood and temerity 
to speak impolitely to his august captor. 

Even Linderfelt himself did not expect 
exoneration. It will be recalled that he 
plead guilty to certain of the assault 
charges. But then the militiaman doubt- 
less thought that while they were spread- 
ing the whitewash they might as well daub 
some on him. They might be in need of 
it some day themselves, and it is well to 
liave friends, you know. 

The astounding part of it is that no one 
is surprised. It was all expected. But 
even more astounding than that is the fact 
that the militianian still takes himself seri- 
ously. Instead of doing that, he should 
take, himself and his farcical but highly 
expensive reports into that oblivion which 
has been yawning for him ever since that 
awful Monday at Ludlow. — Trinidad (Col.) 
Free Press. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 57l) 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland BIdgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Synclicnts des Tn- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomcns-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond. Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volliard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima dc 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboncros y Marineros, Callc ingia- 
tcrra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (.Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos), 
BRAZIL. 
Associacao de Marinlieiros e Remaiidores, Run 
Barao de .Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo dc Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara. 
Rua dos Hencdictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



B. 



A. E. BLAIZE 



The two greatest British unions of 
smiths, which together number 10,000 
members, have decided to amalga- 
mate. 

The Meat Industry Employes at 
the abattoirs, Adelaide, arc drawing 
up a log of wages and conditions 
for presentation to the board. 

A conference of operative bakers 
in Holland has decided to accept 
the principle of joint action in re- 
gard to the opposition to night 
work. 

The secretary of the Sydney eight- 
hour committee, in a reference to the 
growth in union membership in New 
South Wales, says that his organiza- 
tion represents over 150,000 unionists. 
Returns received from certain 
selected ports in Great Britain (at 
which over 70 per cent, of the total 
tonnage in the foreign trade arrived 
and departed) show that during July 
52,664 seamen, of whom 5,110 (or 9.7 
per cent.) were foreigners, were 
shipped on foreign-going vessels. 
Compared with July, 1913. there was 
a net decrease of 2,749, or 5.0 per 
cent. There were large decreases at 
Southampton, Cardiff and Glasgow, 
and a considerable increase at Leith. 
A conference of New Zealand em- 
ployers of wharf labor after three 
days' deliberation reached a decision 
which will introduce a new era as 
far as the control of wharves is con- 
cerned. It was resolved to form an 
association of employers whose 
object is to bring the whole water- 
front labor under one control. It 
has been decided to hold a con- 
ference with ofificials of the Wharf 
Laborers' Union to secure the co- 
operation of that organization in 
making the scheme a success. Prac- 
tically the whole of the employers of 
waterfront labor have signified their 
intention of joining the association. 
The British Labor Gazette reports 
that the total number of claims to 
unemployment benefit made at labor 
exchanges and other local offices of 
the unemployment fund during the 
five weeks ended 31st July, 1914, was 
103,730, as compared with 73.743 
during the four weeks ended 26th 
June, and with 68,806 during the 
four weeks ended 25th July, 1913. 
Of the total of 103,730 claims, 69,438 
(or 67 per cent.) were claims for 
the direct payment of benefit, and 
34,292 (or 33 per cent.) were claims 
for payment of benefit through asso- 
ciations of workpeople in the insured 
trades having arrangements with the 
Board of Trade under section 105 of 
the National Insurance Act. 

As the result of inquiries made by 
the Department of Labor Statistics 
in the United Kingdom particulars 
are now available respecting the 
membership of trade unions, both 
registered and unregistered, federa- 
tions of trade unions, and trade 
councils at the end of 1913. At the 
end of 1913 the total membership of 
the 1,135 registered and unregistered 
trade unions known to the depart- 
ment was 3,993,769, an increase of 
21.5 per cent, compared with the 
previous year. This membership is 
greatly in excess of any hitherto 
recorded, and the rate of increase is 
little below the high rate of 1911 
(23.4 per cent.). The expansion in 
meinbership was common to prac- 
tically all trades, but was especially 
marked in the transport and general 
labor groups. Some of the increase 
is attributable to trade-union activity 
in connection with the National In- 
surance Act. 



CANNON 

CANNON a BLAIZE 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



San Pedro Letter List. 



M. BROWN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

•437 PROINT STREET SAIV PEDRO 



CLOTHES SATISFACTION 

IS THE RESULT WHEN YOU CONSULT 

S. G. SWANSON 

For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postofflce 

Established 1904 at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Kupfer, born February 9, 
1890, at Coburg, Germany, is in- 
quired for by the German Consulate, 
201 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johannes Puun, born in Oesel, 
Arensburg, Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 
Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 84 Embarcadero, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

$10.00 reward will be paid by 
Johnson & Higgins, 244 California 
street, for information locating John 
Anderson and George T. Nelson, 
who were members of the crew of 
the steamship "Asuncion" in Octo- 
ber, 1908. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark "Oasis," Sept. 
2, 1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Heinrich Schel, born in Zingst, 
near Barth, Germany, is requested 
to communicate with Mr. A. Praast, 
93 Diepe Straat, Antwerp, Belgium. 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 
—5-13-14. 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y.— 6-24-14. 

Norman Hadley, a seaman, sup- 
posed to be sailing on the Pacific 
Coast, is inquired for by J. B. Mc- 
Curdy & Co., attorneys, relative to 
an inheritance. Anybody knowing 
his whereabouts, please notify Chief 
of Police, San Francisco. 

John Rebbetad, who was in the 
steamer A. F. Lucas in November, 
1911, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister. Miss Lucy Wood, 108 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the ofhce of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 
Anybody knowing the where- 
abouts of Arne Johnsen please 
notify O. M. Johnsen, Mosby, 
Christiand S., Norway. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship "Candida" at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

Fritjof Ellingsen, age 32, a native 
of Drammen, Norway, he was short, 
heavy set, dark hair, parted in the 
center, and good looking. Anybody 
knowing his whereabouts please noti- 
fy Ed Knach, 171 Clipper street, city. 
John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 

William Walker, a native of Island- 
magee, Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
municate with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willowbank St., Brooklands, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen. No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 
John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
New Orleans, La. 



Andersen, George 
Andersen, K. P. 

-1717 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Martin 
Anderson, Axel 



Lajie. Gus 
Llndberg, Wm. 
Lindner, J. -1750 
Lundberg, T. 
Lyngard, Jorgen 
Monterra, J. 



Anderson! Gust. -810 Mardisan. Andrew 
Andersson, E. -1762 Mesak, K. 



Alexandersen, P. 
Andersen, A. -1645 
Bensen, Severln 
Berndt, Hugo 
Bringsrud, Harald 
Brien. Hans 
Berg, S. 
Cirul, M. 
Christensen, A. 

-1095 
Cotter, J. 
Cliristensen, H. 

-1336 
Centisan, Chas. 
Carlson, Kalle 
Ceelan, John 
Clausen, J. 
Dunn, Wm. 
Dreger, Jack 
Kvertsen, Olaf 
Essen. Carl 
EUingson, Ivar 
Enstrom. Carl M. 
Eklund, Sven 
Fasholz. Dan 
Folvik, Lewis 
Felsch, Harry 
Ferem, William 
Genesen, Charlie 
Grigoleit, E. 
Gunther, Dick 
Gustafson. Alf 
Hansen, Sigvorth 
Holmborg. Frank 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hansen, Marlus 
Hingren. Hj 
Holm, Arthur 
Holmstrom. Fritz 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, H. T, 



Hansen, Johannes 
Hakonsen, P. O. 
Haro, Aarp 
Harrold, Henry 
Ivarsen, Ivar 



Madsen, Charlie 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Machada, Enrique 
Martinelli, Watler 
Mennicke, Fritz 
Murray, Robert 
Miller, Wm. 
Mayers, P. M. 
Mirhaelsen, A. -1105 
Morris, M. H. 
Nielsen, Edward 
Nielsen, Chr. 
Nikander, Dan 
Nurhanen, E. 
Neergard, A. -1165 
Olsen, A. O. -759 
Olsen, Jacob 
Olsen, Harald 
Olsen, Ludvig 
Olsen, Nick 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Ole WUhelm 
Osterberg, S. H. 

-1284 
Paader, Hugo 
Paul, Peter G. 
Petersen, Aage 
Paulson. Gustaf 
Pearson, Ed 
Rytko, Otto 
Ridnell, J. H. 
Rantman, R. 
Rutel, Ernest 
Shager, Ernest 
Schmidt, Louis 
Skaaner, Jack 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Seversen, Chas. 
Stromsberg. Ivar 

2219 Stenroos, William 

1446 Svensen, Nick 



Swanson, E. 
Stolt, Axel 
Steen. Ed 
Svendsen, S. -1717 
Schlachte, Alfred 



Johansen, Ed. -2240 Steen, J. C 
Johnsson, Chas. A. Sievers, G. P. 
Johansen, Emtl 
Johannsen, Charlie 
Johan.sson, N. A. 

-280 
Johansson. Algot 
Jensen. Oscar M. 
Karlson, Richard 



Simpson, L. C. 
Sandy, Oskar 
Samuelsen, Victor 
Tell, Olaf 
Thompson. B. -282 
Tvedt, Olai 
Wrig. F. 



Kristiansen, N. -1093 Waddington, W. H. 
Kremer. Sigurd Zimmer. Walter 

Kalnamm, Andvey Zunderer, Theodor 
Leideker. E. Packages. 

Lang, Chas. Johansen. Nils A. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, Anton 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Edvard 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Gusz, Henry 
Hansen, Eugen 
Hansen, Jens 
Jorgen.sen, C. M. 



Johanson. John -880 
Kosklnen, Suttro 
More, Walter 
Silver, Salin E. 
Ivertsen, Sigvald 
Sperkman, Mae 
Tomkin, Frank 



B. 



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Peter Bellenot, who last sailed on 
the S. S. "Mariposa" out of Seattle, 
Wash., about November, 1912, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Mrs. Bel- 
lenot, 1406 Second street, West 
Berkeley, Cal. Anyone knowing of 
him kindly write at the above ad- 
dress. — 6-24-14. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Canada is reported to have paid $1,250,000 for 
the two Chilean submarines "Antofagasta" and 
"Iquique," sold by the Electric Boat Company. 

The North German Lloyd steamer "Prinz 
Waldemar" put in at Honolulu on September 
9 for refuge and to cable for instructions. The 
vessel carries no wireless. Her stay will be 
indefinite. 

The Tide Water Mill Co., of Portland, plans 
to place a steam schooner in the lumber trade 
between Florence, on the Siuslaw River, and 
San Francisco. The company has four vessels 
in the lumber trade, the schooners "Hugh Ho- 
gan," "Oakland" and "Sausalito" and the barge 
"Lawrence." 

The dredger "Coronado," which the Redstack 
tug "Dauntless" was towing from San Pedro, 
is at Monterey in a capsized condition. The 
hulk took to leaking at sea and tu-rned turtle 
as the "Dauntless" was getting it into Monte- 
rey Bay for safety. The "Coronado" was to 
have been used in the Standard Dredging Com- 
pany's blasting operations on Centissima rock. 

Wherever the German cruisers "Leipzig" and 
"Nurnberg," the only vessels of the Kaiser's 
navy afloat on the Pacific outside of the fleet 
bottled up by the Japs, may be, the local ship- 
ping world does not seem to be worrying. 
French and British vessels, laden with Cali- 
fornia barley consigned to the United King- 
dom, are again being dispatched with old time 
regularity. 

The first foreign vessel to be transferred to 
United States registry in San Francisco harbor 
was the four-masted bark "Annie M. Reed." 
The "Annie M. Reed" was formerly the British 
bark "Howard D. Troop." She was built in 
Glasgow in 1892, is of 2165 tons' register, and 
upon being purchased by the Hind-Rolph Com- 
pany a few years ago was rechristened "Annie 
M. Reed," the maiden name of Mrs. James 
Rolph, Jr. 

The schooner "Halcyon," from Puget Sound 
to Papeete on private terms, is the only off- 
shore lumber charter reported in the weekly 
freight circular of the Shipowners' Association 
of the Pacific Coast. Coastwise rates continue 
fluctuating, the rates from northern points to 
.San Francisco being as follows: From Mendo- 
cino ports and Humboldt Bay, $2.75; from Coos 
Bay, $3; from Gray's Harbor, Willapa Harbor, 
Columbia River and Puget Sound, $3.25. 

Richard J. Ringwood, traffic manager of the 
Pacific-Alaska Navigation Company, has an- 
nounced that the company has decided upon a 
new system of freight charges for carrying 
commodities up and down the coast, which will 
be inaugurated January 1, 1915. Under the new 
system the freight charges will be based upon 
deadweight instead of measurement, and the 
rate to the shipper will include the various 
port charges, which at present are billed sepa- 
rately. 

A 90-day notice has been served on all co- 
carriers of the Panama Railroad Company to 
the effect that the existing working arrange- 
ment whereby the railroad acts as an inter- 
mediate carrier will be terminated. After the 
expiration of the 9G-day period the steamship 
lines to the Isthmus will be expected to make 
their own arrangements for the transfer of 
cargo, either at Cristobal or Balboa, as may 
be most advantageous, and the railroad will 
serve as a cocarrier only in case of emergency. 
The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company 
is planning to enter into active competition 
vvith the transcontinental railroads for the car- 
riage of deciduous fruits from California. The 
American-Hawaiian Steamship Company has six 
of its new boats equipped with refrigerating ap- 
paratus, the "Panaman," "Washingtonian," 
"Ohioan," "lowan," "Pennsylvanian" and Mon- 
tanan." Each of these vessels has space suffi- 
cient to carry 1,500 tons of deciduous fruits, and 
with six vessels in this service it will be possible 
to have a cargo here every ten days. 

A plan of the Sugar Factors Company, Ltd., 
to refine the entire Hawaiian sugar crop in 
California in the future became known at Hono- 
lulu on September 7. It is said the plan in- 
cludes a proposal to spend $5,000,000 on en- 
largements to the refinery at Crockett, Cal. 
Allen M. Nowell, secretary and manager of the 
Sugar Factors Company, Ltd., and Edward D. 
Tenney, vice-president and general manager of 
Castle and Cooke, sugar factors, are now on 
the Pacific Coast to make arrangements for 
new transportation facilities adequate to hand- 
ling the Hawaiian output in total. 

What amounts to a prohibition against the 
use of merchant steamers obtaining coal at U. 
S. ports for transfer at sea to belligerent war- 
ships has been established through the declara- 
tion of the State Department that any ship 
which leaves an American port on a mission of 
that sort will be regarded as a man-of-war. 
Such passenger or freight steamers would not 
be permitted to coal again at an American 
port for three months. Hitherto it has been 
the practice of nations to make no inquiries 
about the destination of neutral ships, but the 
State Department felt if coaling at sea were 



permitted through neutral ships, belligerents 
would have just cause for complaint. 

From all accounts the Alaska fishing season 
just closed was one of the most successful on 
record. Nearly all the streams were choked 
with fish and the various canning stations kept 
going to capacity. A heavy pack is especially 
welcome at this time, as the European war will 
cause an increased demand for canned salmon. 
Locally this probably will have the effect of 
raising the price, it is said. Salmon will form 
the principal cargo of many vessels which are 
to leave here for England and Europe the next 
couple of months. The codfishing season in 
Behring Sea is reported to have been equally as 
satisfactory this year as was the salmon season. 
Returning codfishing vessels are bringing full 
cargoes. 

A determined protest was made in San Fran- 
cisco on September 10 at a mass meeting of 
licensed officers of American vessels against 
the suspension of the navigation laws for the 
benefit of vessels affected by the emergency 
act just passed by Congress, admitting foreign- 
built vessels to American registry. The protest 
was addressed to President Wilson, Secretary 
William C. Redfield, Secretary W. B. Wilson, 
Senator J. P. Clarke, Joshua W. Alexander and 
all Pacific Coast Congressmen and Senators. 
It was signed by 350 licensed marine engineers, 
masters and mates. The resolution embodying 
the protest was adopted after several addresses 
delivered in the hall of the Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association's hall, on Steuart street. 

The local firm of Sudden & Christiansen has 
inaugurated a new service between Pacific Coast 
and Eastern ports, via the Panama Canal, and 
with the arrival on this Coast of the steamship 
"Montos," which steamed from Norfolk, Va., 
recently, and the steamer "Lewis K. Thurlow," 
which is due to steam from the East Coast 
within a few days, will have three vessels on the 
run. The third steamship, the "Peter H. 
Crowell," is now on Puget Sound. All three 
vessels are under charter to the Sudden & 
Christianson concern, and will be used as lum- 
ber carriers between this Coast and the At- 
lantic, bringing on their return voyages cargoes 
of general merchandise. The "Montos" is 
bringing 4000 tons of coal for Seattle. Each 
of the vessels is capable of carrying a cargo 
of 5,000,000 feet of lumber, and the fleet will be 
a substantial addition to the American regis- 
tered lumber fleet now plying between Pacific 
and Atlantic ports via the Canal. 

The arrival at San Francisco of the British 
steamer "Cetriana" presented a complicated 
problem as a result of the European war. The 
vessel was chartered by the German Govern- 
ment prior to the outbreak of hostilities for a 
period of six months and was to be used to 
carry coal to the German cruiser "Leipzig" on 
the lower coast. Upon her arrival the "Cetri- 
ana" was entered to the German Consulate and 
a further delicate situation arose when it was 
necessary for Captain Minister, who is a lieu- 
tenant in the Royal Naval Reserve, to call on 
the German Consul with the sjiip's papers. The 
"Cetriana" left San Francisco on July 24 laden 
with a cargo of coal for the "Leipzig," which 
was then at Mazatlan. Although war had not 
been declared the captain of the German cruiser 
evidently was aware that hostilities were ap- 
proaching, for he ordered the "Cetriana" to 
Magdalena Bay, where, after coaling from the 
vessel, the merchantman was stripped of her 
wireless and sent on her way. This happened 
on August 5. Since that time the "Leipzig" has 
been in here and is now supposed to be some- 
where on the lower coast again. 



DECKHANDS FOR STATE SERVICE. 

The California State Civil Service Commission 
announces that applications for employment as 
Deckhands in the service of the State will be 
received at the office of the Commission, State 
Capitol, Sacramento, on or before September 
19, 1914. The State employs Deckhands in con- 
nection with the Board of State Harbor Com- 
missioners in San Francisco, at a salary of $80 
per month. There are now five vacancies to be 
filled. 

Candidates must have had at least one year's 
experience in some kind of employment con- 
nected with shipping within the last five years, 
and must be able to row a boat, go aloft, swim 
and splice lines in order to qualify for this ex- 
amination. 

Further information and application blanks 
may be secured from the State Civil Service 
Commission, State Capitol, Sacramento. 

Applications must be properly executed and 
filed with the Commission on or before Septem- 
ber 19, 1914. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
ofiicer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, HI. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mas.s., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
^g^^^O^RL"^iN^°Y!°,"*3^06S°u"fir^S? ^*- 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY. 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. ^<='^P"°"e 2107 

c'^ellea ^'■''"''^' ^°° ^^^* ^'- Telephone 5153 
Branches: 

p-1^THL^Il^^S.^Ll.!^''lT7'"SJurst 
PHILADELPHIA, P a.. 227T ansom St. 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON. Mass., ly^A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West qt 
BALTIMORE. Md., 802-804 S Broadwav 
NORFOLK. Va., 41 Loyalls Lane ^' 

NEW ORLEANS. La., 206 Jufia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 

HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY. 214 West St. 

LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 W 9th St 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., 133 Clinton %t 
N. TONA WANDA. N. Y is" MainSt 
CONNE.AUT HARBOR. 6. 992 Day It 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St ^ *' 

DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbride-p 9t TTaof 
SUPERIOR, Wis. 1721 N Thifd St' 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 pifth Ave 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y. 70 Isabella St 

PORT"H?T5I?i^"Sr'- ^J'- J°42'K",n^^ Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTENn 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 

CmCAC^O^n' ^.l^^l^^ ¥\ Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, III., 445 La Sa le Ave 
DETROIT. Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 151 Reed St 
SUPERIOR. Wis.. 1814 Fourth St 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y. 70 Isabella St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 West Ninth <?t 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St 
CHICAGO. III., 406 N. Clark St 
ASHTABULA, O.. 74 Bridge St 
TOLEDO. O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Enst Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON, Mich.. 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT. O., 922 Day St 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Lsabella St 
N TONA WANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St 
SITPERTOR. Wi.s., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VICTORIA, B. C, 518 Yates St 
VANCOUVER, B C, 213 Hasting St E corner of 

1?^:' ^a's"h.,-22?8 ^°ort^^lW'^^t:---" "- 

iB"El^l>'^EN^'^^sh.!V^^2>^'^^Bol'-6^- ^- ^'"^ '' 
PORTLAND. Ore.. 44 Union Ave ' Box 2100 
EUREKA. Cal., 227 First St., P? O Box 64 
SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67 

P O^Box^SH' "■ '^- ^'"■- '^"^'=" ^""^ Nuuanu Sts„ 



m: 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 1408Vi. Western Ave., P. O. Box 



PORTL.\ND. Ore., 101 N. Front St 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



-PAUI. SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .lOURNAI,, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of tlie iiaper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1914. 



NOLUME XXVni. 



With this issue the Journal enters upon 
the twenty-eighth year of its life. 

Those twenty-seven years cover an eventful 
period in the workers' struggle for "more." 
It is doubtful if there ever was a like period 
in the history of mankind during whicli 
greater and more permanent aciiievements 
liave I)cen made by and for the tnen and 
women of toil. The seamen of the world, 
particularly, have made splendid strides. 
They know to-day that there is no short cut 
to the millennium, that there is no material 
or lasting progress to be made except 
through organization. 

Organization is the salvation ui the world's 
workers. The Journal has preached that 
kind of salvation for all these years ; it has 
contributed its modest share to inspire the 
weary march of labor; it has raised its voice 
for every worthy cause and never faltered 
in pressing forward and onward toward an 
ideal — the Brotherhood of Man. This may 
seem like self-praise, but is not intended as 
such. A birthday comes only once a year, 
and we merely want to remind those who 
glance over these pages from week to week 
that another completed volume is about to 
be placed upon the shelf. 

Here's our rule for the ensuing year : 

To look up and not down, 

To look forward and not back, 

To look out and not in, and 

To lend a hand. 



RUBBING IT IN! 



The lessening of the daily hours of labor 
increases the total of products by increasing 
the op])ortunity and disposition for consuming 
them. The sum of the difference between 
a savage and a civilized state is merely the 
difference between men who have time and 
inclination to gratify their physical needs only, 
and men who have time, inclination, and de- 
termination to indulge and cultivate the in- 
tellectual side of their nature. 



The employer of child labor is a homicide 
on the wholesale. 



There is a tendency just now to rush 
tiirough Congress certain species of legisla- 
tion pertaining to ships and shipping. As a 
result, Mr. Robert Dollar and other well- 
known patriots who are so deeply interested 
in the building up of an American Merchant 
Marine (manned exclusively by Asiatic 
crews), seem to have a fair chance of hav- 
ing their hearts' desires gratified — at last. 
.\t any rate, it is quite certain that the pas- 
sage of the so-called ship registry law has 
brought aid and comfort to coolie lovers. 
The venerable "Captain" Dollar is quoted as 
saying that "the bill on the whole is far bet- 
ter than the shipowners had hoped for." 
That tells the story. When Congress enacts 
laws pleasing to men of the Dollar type it 
is time to take notice. And it may be said, 
in passing, that due notice has been taken 
and a proper protest has been filed — only, 
however, after it was too late. 

It so happened that President Wilson very 
(juickly availed himself of the authority 
granted him under the ship registry law by 
sus])ending certain sections of the navigation 
laws, as follows : 

I'irst: "All foreign built ships which shall be 
admitted to I'nitcd States registry under said 
act may retain the watch officers employed 
thereon without regard to citizenship for seven 
years from this date and such watch officers 
shall be eligible for promotion, any vacancy 
occurring among such watch officers within two 
years from tliis date may be filled without regard 
to citizenship, but any vacancies which may 
occur thereafter shall be filled by a watch 
officer who is a citizen of the United States." 

Second: "That the provisions of law requiring 
survey inspection and measurement by officers 
of the United States of foreign built ships 
admitted to United States registry under said 
act arc hereby suspended for two years from 
this date." 

This means in i)lain language that the 
American licensed deck-officers and engineers 
have suddenly been placed in the same posi- 
tion as the balance of the crew. They must 
hereafter compete with the world, for no 
American shijjowner, no matter how full of 
patriotism he may be, will ever employ any 
but the cheapest available labor, unless — well, 
unless there is a com])act, fighting labor or- 
ganization to reckon with. \m\ .American 
licensed officers now have the novel experi- 
ence of having it rubbed into their hides 
that after all they too are wage-earners. 
They will now see with their own eyes that 
greed and the rule, "Dividends First," re- 
spects no persons, not even licensed officers. 
Many of them have doubtless suspected this 
for a long while, but the majority seem to 
have been content to leave the shipowners 
arrange such details as wages, hours and 
working conditions. 

Here is the "protest" as formally adopted 
at a mass meeting of licensed officers in San 
Francisco : 

Whereas, President Woodrow Wilson has seen 
fit to suspend the navigation laws of the United 
States, requiring all licensed officers on vessels 
of the United States to be citizens of the 
United States, and also has suspended for a 
period of two years that vessels of foreign 
buiid taking American register, shall be in- 
spected, surveyed and measured; and 

Whereas, It is a well-verified fact that here 
on the Pacific Coast hundreds of competent 
licensed officers, both engineers and deck-offi- 
cers, have been and are at the present time 
unable, on account of a general stagnation in 
the shipping business, to get employment at 
their respective trades; and 

Whereas, This suspension of tlie navigation 
laws leaves foreign officers serving in those ves- 
sels absolutely under no control of the United 
States Steamboat Inspectors, nor under the ju- 
risdiction of any foreign boards of trade, and 
therefore absolutely immune from any prosecu- 
tion for misconduct or other acts of violation 
of shipping laws, either of the United States or 
the country to which such vessels belonged 
prior to their change of register; and 

Whereas, The change of register of a vessel 



after declaration of war, belonging to either 
belligerent, is a clear violation of international 
law, making such vessel liable to condemnation 
by any prize court; therefore it has been 

Resolved, By the licensed officers of the Pa- 
cific Coast in mass meeting assembled, that we 
unanimously protest against this suspension of 
the navigation laws of the United States, as we 
consider this not only detrimental to the inter- 
ests of .American ciizens holding licenses, but 
that it is likely to bring this country into the 
present turmoil in Europe; further 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be 
forwarded to President Wilson, Secretary Wil- 
liam C. Redfield, Secretary William B. Wilson, 
Senator James P. Clarke, Hon. Joshua W. Alex- 
ander, and to all the Senators and Congressmen 
from the Pacific Slope. 

Of course, this protest is too late. 

Let us hope, however, that this "suspen- 
sion of laws" will awaken the licensed men 
to a realization of their stattis as workers. 
If it does, Mr. Dollar and his comi)atriots 
will soon discover that they have crowed too 
soon ; for it is the worker, not the voter, who 
governs the condition of labor. 

Do you get that, brother licensed man? 



ANOTHER DELAY. 



The Seamen's bill has been sent back to 
the Senate Committee on Commerce. This 
action was taken on reconsideration after the 
Senate had referred the measure to a confer- 
ence committee. Comrade Furuseth has sub- 
mitted a brief for the use of the committee, 
setting forth the differences between the La 
Follette bill and the House substitute, and 
giving other reasons why such legislation 
should be enacted. 

It appears that the European war is now 
used as an argument against this legislation. 
It is claimed that this is not the time to be- 
come involved in any controversy with for- 
eign nations. The answer to this is that the 
legislation contemplates proceeding strictly 
according to treaty provisions; that it could 
not get into force in foreign vessels visiting 
our harbors in less time than eighteen months ; 
that any real difficulty would develop when 
treaty nations are notified of the desire of the 
United States as provided in this bill, and 
steps could then be taken accordingly. 

Another contention made is that shipowners 
may not hoist the American flag because of 
this legislation. The answer to this is that 
they took foreign register because of reduced 
cost of operation under foreign flags. Amer- 
ican citizens or corporations owning vessels 
under foreign flags will no doubt bring them 
under the American flag now because of the 
war. If the Seamen's bill should be enacted, 
especially as it was adopted by the Senate, 
there will come automatically an equalization 
in the cost of operation, and the vessels now 
accepting American register will remain under 
the flag. If this legislation shall fail, they 
will go back under foreign flag after the war 
is over, because of the advantage in the cost 
of operation that is now enjoyed and which 
is bound to continue until this or similar leg- 
islation shall be enacted. 



The Sacramento Bee takes issue with the 
Journal's recent statement that "both the 
I'nion and non-Union laborites of the Pa- 
cific Coast are for the immediate adoption of 
a universal eight-hour law." The Bee says 
that this is "undoubtedly true of the Social- 
istic element in the ranks of Labor," but 
"doubts whether it be true of the conserva- 
tive and thinking men in the ranks of the 
workers." That is putting it in a most 
unkind manner. Perhaps we do not think 
enough, but we console ourselves with the 
thought that we are not among those — 

With too much quickness ever to be taught; 
With too much thinking to have common 
thought. 



:k^'SMJ!L . 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FRESH AIR NOT NEEDED? 



The testimonial records obtained by the 
United States Commission on Industrial Re- 
lations in its recent session at San Francisco 
will undoubtedly make a very interesting 
study. Men in all stations of life were 
called upon to present their views and knowl- 
edge pertaining to their own respective 
branches of the industrial field. 

The first witness called to the stand on 
"Labor Conditions in Construction Camps," 
was W. S. Wollner, representing the chief 
engineer of the Northwestern Pacific Rail- 
way Company. This worthy specimen of the 
average corporation parasite proved his ig- 
norance of modern thought, and exhibited 
an absolute inability to grasp the progress of 
civilization, by assuming an attitude directly 
in variance with enlightened ideas regarding 
the relations of employer and employe. The 
reactionary efforts of Mr. Wollner were 
made painfully apparent by the structure and 
spirit of certain parts of his evidence. Here 
is some of it : 

What is the use of providing expensive toilets 
in construction camps for men who never have 
and never will use them? If they did, the trans- 
mission of disease would be such that the health 
officers would quarantine us. 

The State law demanding 500 cubic feet of 
air for each occupant of a sleeping room is im- 
practicable and unnecessary. An ordinary box- 
car has 2025 cubic feet, which would make an 
outfit for 250 men a half mile long. As a mat- 
ter of fact, the men don't want air. They stop 
up every crack. The men get all the air they 
need in the day time while they are at work on 
the grade. 

The minimum wage for construction work is 
$2 and the maximum charge for board is 75 
cents, making a man's profit $1.25 per day to 
spend on clothes and tobacco. During the pe- 
riods of unemployment the men live on 35 or 
40 cents a day, and so for each day's work a 
man could support himself for three days at 
leisure were it not for the drink habit. 

If the United States Commission on In- 
dustrial Relations are in search of the catises 
leading to industrial unrest they have at least 
unearthed one of them in the expressed ideas 
of this railroad representative. This typical 
attitude of a certain class of employer or 
boss towards the employe is self-explanatory. 
However, the expressions of the worthy Mr. 
Wollner are about as brutally frank an ad- 
mission as ever emanated from the lips of an 
exploiter of labor regarding their attitude 
towards the workers. 

There is eonugh food for reflection in this 
testimony to keep students of economic con- 
ditions, and the institutions and authorities 
upon the subject, guessing and investigating 
for considerable time. There is enough 
deadly venom in it^if assiduously exploited 
— to breed an army of dynamiters. Space 
does not permit of even a superficial review 
of the before mentioned brutal conception of 
employers of imskilled and unorganized la- 
borers regarding their rights or the lack of 
interest displayed in the welfare of the most 
exploited of labor. 

There are a number of employers of labor 
and representatives of corporations who are 
of the type as exemplified by the President 
of the United Railroads of San Francisco. 
These gentlemen are capable of hiding their 
feelings and actions behind a cloak of phil- 
anthropy and respectability. They assume a 
benign and paternal attitude towards their 
employes and the general public. They give 
free life insurance and make loans to their 
employes, but they sternly set their faces 
against self-help — i. e., organization. 

The other extreme, this uncouth scullion of 
predatory interests really required muzzling. 



He exposed the hand of piratical exploitation 
face upward. 

A few more public eruptions of the Woll- 
ner class may in time cause people to be- 
lieve that all employers are more or less 
nearly related to this particular type, and 
then the necessity for the investigations of 
an Industrial Relations Commission will have 
ceased. While the greater part of society, 
composed of workers and producers, remain 
in a semi-comatose state, believing that the 
interests of Capital and Labor can be merged, 
or are to an extent one and the same, they 
tolerate such indignities and injustice as pro- 
mulgated by the representative of the North- 
western Pacific, believing that eventually a 
remedy will be obtained and that justice will 
ultimately prevail. But once awake to the 
fact that he is to be considered as in the light 
of a piece of property or a tool for exploita- 
tion and abuse, without any human, industrial 
or state rights, the worker who carries the 
heaviest load of the world's progress and 
civilization on his back may rebel, and the 
curtain will fall upon the era of the unscru- 
pulous employer. 

In nature everything is presumed to have 
its particular use or ofirce, but notwithstand- 
ing the usefulness of the sewer rat as a 
scavenger, he is mercilessly hunted and ob- 
literated from the face of the earth for his 
vicious characteristics and ability to spread 
plague and disease. Persons who believe 
that the workers get all the fresh air they 
need when at work, are no doubt here for a 
specific purpose ; but it does seem a hardship 
on humanity that they must be permitted to 
pursue the evil tenor of their way — quite 
unmolested ! 



Tile first few issues of the Stockton "Labor 
News" are at hand. The "Labor News" is 
a welcome addition to labor journalism in 
California. The "Labor News" is welcome 
because it is well edited and of splendid typo- 
graphical appearance, but is doubly welcome 
because it succeeds a notorious sheet, known 
as the "News Advocate," which masqueraded 
as a labor paper until the beginning of the 
Stockton lockout. Then, in the hour of need, 
that delectable specimen of treachery deserted 
the workers' cause and went over into the 
camp of the would-be union-crushers. Hail 
the Stockton "Labor News." May it live 
and prosper. Curses upon the hypocrite's 
head who sold his birthright for a mess of 
pottage ! 



BOATS FOR SOME. 

(From "The Public") 



A steamboat plying on Lake Michigan 
was discovered to be on fire when a few 
miles from the Chicago harbor. The wire- 
less would not work. As aid could not be 
summoned, the captain crowded on all 
steam, and reached the pier barely in time 
to save the 250 passengers — mostly women 
and children. What a pleasant reflection 
it would have been for those Congressmen 
who have striven to keep the "boats-for-all- 
and-men-to-handle-them" provision out of the 
Seamen's bill, had this fire started a few 
minutes earlier! Which is it to be, gentle- 
men, boats for all, with sailors to handle 
them, or boats for some with green hands 
to man them? And when is it to be? 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 8, 1914. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m,, E. Andersen presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. Shipwreck Benefit was awarded 
to seven members of the crew of the steam- 
schooner "Scotia" and to nine members of the 
crew of the steamer "Admiral Sampson." 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 14, 1914. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull. E. Ellison, Harry Ohlsen 
and Paul Scharrenberg were elected delegates 
to the annual convention of the State Federa- 
tion of Labor, to be held at Stockton on Octo- 
ber 5, 1914. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 7, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
518 Yates St. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 7, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Taconia Agency, Sept. 7, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; prospects uncer- 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 7, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 7, 1914. 
Shipping .fair; prospects uncertain. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland .A.gency, Sept. 7, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON. Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 44 Union Ave. North. Tel. 
East 4912. 

Eureka Agency, Sept. 7, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 
JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 7, 1914. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN. Agent. 
128'/^ Sepulveda BIdg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. ■ 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 1, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 10, 1914. 
The regular weekly meeting was called to 
order at 7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping slow for cooks, fair 
for waiters. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 3, 1914. 
Shipiiing (|iiict; plenty of men ashore. 

JACK MEADE, Agent pro tern. 
Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. Box No. 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 2, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; few men ashore. 



P. O. Box 54, 



HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 



Portland Agency. Sept. 7, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

THOMAS BAKER. Agent. 
271/2 Second St., Bickle Bldg., Room 10. Phone 
Main 9731. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



GERMANY AT KIAU CHAU. 



According to the American Economic 
League, Kiau Chau fiflers the foremost of 
the very few examples of inipcriahstic gov- 
ernment under which an earnest and intelli- 
gent effort has been made to establish eco- 
nomic justice. 

As soon as Germany obtained possession 
of Kiau Chau in 1897, a proclamation was 
issued stopping all transfers of land titles 
without official consent. The German com- 
missioner, Dr. WilHam Schrameicr, realized 
the necessity of taking measures to prevent 
land speculators from blocking indu.stry and 
reaping the financial benefits of improvements 
to be instituted. So the new government at 
once appraised the value of all land within 
the colony. Whatever land was required for 
public purposes was bought at prices pre- 
vailing before the German occupation. No 
sale of land to a private individual is valid 
unless made at public auction. Then the 
colonial government assumes the right to 
purchase at the price reported to be agreed 
upon. When the government refrains from 
taking advantage of this right, one-third of 
the increase in value since the original ap- 
praisement or since the last sale under Ger- 
man administration, must be paid into the 
public treasury. The right reserved by the 
government to purchase discourages any 
scheming to evade through misrepresenta- 
tion the 33 1-3 per cent, increment tax. 

At the end of twenty-five years a second 
appraisement of all land within the colony 
was to be made and an assessment of one- 
third of the increase in value was to be 
levied wherever there had been no sales 
within that period. 

An annual tax of ('> j^er cent, on the sell- 
ing value of all land was levied. Thus un- 
der Dr. Schrameicr's able supervision there 
was nipped in the bud all prospect of any 
enormous inflation of land values through 
speculative manipulation. 

The result of this system was prosperity 
for Kiau Chau. In eleven years it rose from 
thirty-sixth place among Chinese ports to 
seventh. From 1900 to 1912 the value of 
its imports increased 187 fold and of its ex- 
ports more than 780 fold. During the same 
period the value of imports of Shanghai, the 
most important of Chinese ports, fell off 16 
per cent, and exports increased only 5 per 
cent. The port of Chifu, near to Kiau Chau, 
had in 1900, thirty times tho imports of the 
latter and more than sixty times the exports. 
In 1912, Kiau Chau imported twice as much 
as Chifu, and exported about twice as much. 

The population of Kiau Chau was esti- 
mated in 1899 at 60,000. By 1912 it had 
increased to 169,000. During the same period 
the population of Chifu increased from 40,000 
to only 54.000. while Shanghai's population, 
estimated in 1900 at 620,000, had only grown 
to 651,000 by 1912. 

It is doubtful what will happen to Kiau 
Chau should German authority be perma- 
nently removed. It would be a serious loss 
to civilization should the Japanese govern- 
ment or the despotic Yuan Shi Kai interfere 
with the Single Tax .system. 



Portable power plants up to fifty horse- 
power that use crude oil for fuel are 
coming into common use in France. 



INCREASE IN NAVAL STRENGTH. 



Setting aside losses in war, British naval 
strength in relation to Germany is likely to 
go on increasing as long as the war lasts. 
This, at any rate, is the opinion of "Ship- 
ping Illustrated," of New York, which basis 
its forecast upon the following facts : 

There are two enormous battleships com- 
pleting on the Tyne for Chile, armed with 
ten 14-inch guns apiece, and no doubt the 
Admiralty has its eye on them. So far as 
the usual sources of information go, Ger- 
many is building only one capital ship for 
foreign account ; besides a few light cruisers 
and destroyers. In the ordinary course the 
four "Queen Elizabeths," with their formida- 
ble batteries of 15-inch guns, were not due to 
be ready until next spring, but they will 
doubtless be com])leted for service before the 
end of the year. Strenuous efforts are be- 
ing made to get ready the large batch of 
light cruisers now on the slips, particularly 
the light 29-knot "destroyers of destroyers," 
which will be particularly useful in the sort 
of guerilla warfare that the German Navy 
is most likely to favor. Germany will, no 
doubt, strain her sinews to the utmost, but 
Great Britain has a great advantage over 
her in ships under construction. When the 
last of the "Koenig.s" is finished (which 
should be at the end of this month) she will 
have seventeen Dreadnoughts in commission. 
But she will only have on the stocks the 
"Ersatz Worth," commenced at Schichau, 
Danzig, in .\pril, 1913; the "Ersatz Kaiser 
Friedrich III," laid down at Wilhelmhaven 
only a few weeks since ; and a battle-cruiser, 
as yet only indicated by the initial "T," laid 
down at Kiel, in May, 1913. Try, therefore, 
as she may, Germany cannot add more than 
two battleships to her navy in the next six 
months, whereas, including the two Chilean 
ships, Great Britain can add six. 



VAST CALIFORNIA FORESTS. 



The twenty-nine million acres of Na- 
tional Forest in California are to be made 
part of the laboratory equipment of the 
University of California, for now training 
for the profession of forestry may at last 
be obtained in the University of California. 
Walter IMulford, until now Professor of 
Forestry at Cornell, has just arrived at 
Berkeley to head a new Department of 
Forestry in the College of Agriculture. 
Among the subjects in which individual 
courses will be given by Professor Mul- 
ford and Professor Merritt B. Pratt are 
the Elements of Forestry, General For- 
estry, forest mensuration and surveying, 
woodsmanship, forest ecology, natural and 
artificial reproduction of forests, timber 
trees and forest regions, the protection and 
the utilization of forests, wood technology, 
forest engineering, organization, and 
finance ; forestry law, and the national for- 
est practice. 



Take from man the right to quit work 
at his own pleasure, and you take from 
him that attribute which, next to the right 
to light itself, marks the difference be- 
tween the human and the lower animal. 



THE DYING EARTH. 



A combined parcel carrier and folding 
stand, which may be attached to any bicy- 
cle, has been patented. 



The principle of compulsory arbitration, 
i. e., enforced labor, may with equal pro- 
priety be extended to enforce idleness, to 
enforce starvation — in other words, to in- 
flict death. 



A well-known French mathematician, M. 
Verronet, has recently made a most inter- 
esting communication to the French Acad- 
emy of Sciences, in which he states that 
the earth has only another 2,000,000 years 
to live. At about that time life of all de- 
scription on the globe will have ceased, 
owing to the intense cold brought about 
by the reduction of the power of the sun's 
rays. 

The idea, of course, that life on the earth 
will cease as the result of the gradual 
cooling of the sun is no new one, but it is 
the first time that a savant has given the 
earth such a short period of future life as 
2,000,000 years. M. Verronet supposes, ac- 
cording to the theory of Helmholz, that 
the sun is contracting and cooling, and is 
constantly losing its heat energy. The 
present solar temperature is calculated to 
be about 11,192 deg. Fahrenheit, and by 
making certain hypotheses on the conden- 
sation of the sun M. Verronet finds, mathe- 
matically, that the mean temperature of the 
earth's surface is about 52 deg. Fahrenheit, 
with 92 deg. at the equator. And these 
figures, resulting from calculations based 
on the sun, correspond very nearly to ac- 
tuality. 

W^orking backwards from this, M. Ver- 
ronet calculates that 2,000,000 years ago 
the range of the sun's rays was one and 
a half times as powerful as it is now, 
and the quantity of heat shed on the earth 
was proportionately greater. In the neigh- 
borhood of the poles, at 80 deg. latitude, 
the temperature of the surface of the earth 
must have been somewhere about 194 deg. 
Fahrenheit. Life, then, did not appear on 
the earth, according to M. Verronet, until 
after this time, and then began at the 
Poles, the coolest parts of the globe. 

Similarly M. Verronet r; 'culates that 
in 2,000,000 years from nov the quantity 
of heat shed on the earth -..ill be so di- 
minished that our planet will ce completely 
frozen over, the mean temperature at the 
surface being about zero. Life will then 
be impossible on the earth. It will mean 
the death of everything, preceded, in his 
opinion, by a term during which man will 
have returned to barbarism. According 
to his calculations, then, the total duration 
of life on the earth is 4,000,000 years, and 
at the present moment we are at about 
the middle point of the curve which repre- 
sents this terrestrial life. As far as Mars 
is concerned, he says further, calculations 
show that it has been frozen for a long 
time, and that there is no longer any life 
on the surface. 

M. Verronet's speculations gave rise to 
an interesting discussion at the last session 
of the Astronomical Society of France. M. 
Camille Flammarion, the eminent astron- 
omer, was ready to accept the hypotheses 
of M. Verronet only with the greatest re- 
serve. According to him, geology shows 
that the age of life on the earth is much 
more than 2,000,000 years, and he does not 
think that Mars is a frozen world. 

The calculations of M. Verronet can 
neither be affirmed nor denied. But after 
scientists have so long talked cheerily about 
the life of the earth being good for another 
95,000,000 years or so, it is something of a 
shock to have to drop down to the modest 
figure of 2,000,000. 



BE'^CSC^B^S 



:ktsjkk. ■ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A 23-YEAR LAWSUIT. 



The settlement in the New York courts of 
a lawsuit rivaling the famous case of Jarn- 
dyce vs. Jarndyce in Dickens's "Bleak House," 
gives point to all the efforts now on foot to 
lessen the law's delay and simplify judicial 
procedure. We have smiled over the suit 
which ruined the Jarndyce family, remarks 
the Brooklyn "Eagle," taking it for granted 
"that our own courts could not tolerate any 
parallel." But the case of Donnelly vs. Mc- 
Ardle, which has just been decided by the 
court of last resort in New York, has been 
pending for twenty-three years. During that 
time, according to the New York "Herald," 
there have been ten trials. Forty-five judges, 
95 lawyers, and 249 witnesses have been 
involved ; the case has outlived 17 of these 
judges, 13 of the lawyers, and 42 of the wit- 
nesses. Mr. Donnelly gets final confirmation 
of a judgment of $48,000 in his favor, but he 
has spent $186,000 in counsel fees. The liti- 
gation, he is quoted as saying, "has wrecked 
his life." But if "The Herald" is to be 
believed, he is not through yet. As we 
read in its account of the case : 

"Both of the contestants have grown gray 
in the bitter feud, and sj^ent most of their 
fortunes in an effort to best each other. The 
decision finds them virtually poor, but with 
the bitterness born of their earlier hatred 
fanned into fresh flame by the added grim- 
ness of passing years. Both seem ready to 
leap again into the legal arena on the slightest 
provocation. 

"An attempted murder in a court-room, 
pistols drawn in the streets of Albany, the 
expenditure of vast sums of money, and the 
array of eminent counsel in the fight are sev- 
eral of the features that have made the case 
stand out prominently in the history of New 
York jurisprudence. 

" 'It's my life,' Mr. Donnelly once re- 
marked, just after he was arraigned on a 
charge of attempting to .shoot Mr. McArdle 
in 1894. 

" 'I win, but I lose,' was his comment 
Friday when a telegram came from Albany 
telling him that he received only what he 
termed 'a paltry $48,000.' 

"Mr. Donnelly now threatens to sue several 
persons interested in the case, who, he alleges, 
have wronged him. He says he has spent the 
best part of his life in an effort to obtain his 
rights, and that only death will stop him 
from taking up legal cudgels against the per- 
sons he believes are responsible for the award 
of the small amount." 

As the newspapers tell the story, Messrs. 
Donnelly and McArdle were brothers-in-law 
and partners in the iron business. In 1891, 
after business reverses, trouble arose over the 
precise nature of a certain bill of sale, which 
brought the partnership to an end. Donnelly 
sued. The list of dismissals, orders for new 
trials, and appeals as enumerated by "The 
Herald" is confusing enough for the non-legal 
mind. The shooting episode of 1894, said 
to be the first occurrence of the kind in a 
New York courtroom, would have done credit 
to the wildest days of the West or of the 
"feud" region. 

In this case, which it looks upon as illus- 
trating the possibilities in all damage cases, 
the Columbus "Dispatch" finds one explana- 
tion for much of the opposition to workmen's 
compensation laws : 

"Delay makes business for lawyers and pro- 
fessional jurors. It defeats many a just claim 



because of the inability of the injured com- 
plainant to carry it through the courts. It de- 
tracts from the rule of justice by giving an 
undue advantage to the wealthy and withhold- 
ing from the injured, because he is poor, the 
relief that should be his. Nothing is more 
sorely needed than prompter justice. Donnelly 
got his $48,000 by paying out four dollars for 
every one received. If he was entitled to the 
money, he should have got it without expense. 
The same is true of damage claims of every 
sort. The justice that must thus be bought 
or must be fought for until life is wrecked 
or gone is no justice at all." 

And the Brooklyn "Eagle" comments on 
the settlement of this long-drawn out case : 

"Perhaps civilization may some time evolve 
a system of jurisprudence that will absolutely 
prevent any such procrastination of justice. 
A jury left free to act without any appeal 
could have settled the Donnelly claim in 
fifteen minutes, and had it over with. It is 
the appeals that make justice farcical without, 
on the average, making it any more exact 
than it would be without them. That is 
apparent enough to every man who is not a 
lawyer." 



UNUSED LANDS. 



Congressional speeches on the immigra- 
tion bill furnish many shining examples of 
how men can talk all around a subject 
without touching on the essential point. 

Said Mr. Lonergan of Connecticut, on 
January 31: "There are 711,980,000 acres 
of undeveloped public land in the United 
States. We can accommodate a popula- 
tion of 500,000,000 people." 

Said Mr. Johnson of Washington, also 
si)eaking of public lands only: "More than 
90 per cent, of all of Arizona, 87 per cent, 
of Nevada, more than 80 per cent, of Idaho, 
80 per cent, of Utah, almost 70 per cent, 
of Wyoming, 65 per cent, of Montana, 62 
per cent, of New Mexico, half of Oregon, 
half of California, half of Colorado, and 40 
per cent, of my own State, Washington, 
all conserved." 

Said Mr. Peterson of Indiana : "A few 
days ago I made a trip through the South. 
I saw thousands of acres of unimproved 
land, much of it susceptible to cultivation." 

Said Mr. Edmonds of Pennsylvania: 
"For every 100 acres that are now tilled, 
about 375 more acres may be tilled." 

But none of these Congressmen had any 
practicable plan to suggest as to how to 
open this unusued land for use. The rea- 
son the land is unused is because the price 
demanded by the owners is too high for 
would-be users to pay. In order to open 
the land the owners must be induced to re- 
duce their demands. If this will not be' 
done the land might as well be non-exist- 
ent. This point was not touched upon by 
any of these Congressmen. Was it be- 
cause they do not know how to treat it? 



A new Greek law forbids the emigration 
of boys over fourteen, except on deposit 
of a sum varying from $40 to $400, ac- 
cording to age, the deposit being recovera- 
ble if the subject returns and performs his 
militarv service. 



More than half of the world's population 
live in the tropics of the Old World. Un- 
der British rule' alone are over 325,000,000 
tropical natives. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of w^hat has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, Ul. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Teiephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 
BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWATTKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 2295. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO. ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABITLA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBITRG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

STTPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES, 
MARINE HOSPITALS: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS: 
Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. T. 

A.<thtabul.T Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Ruffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich, 

Duluth, Minn. M.Tnitowoc, Wis. 

Esf-anaba, Mich. Mrirquette, Mich. 

Gr.-ind Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Giocn Bay, Mich. Sagin.Tw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

i.iKlington, Mich. S.-iuIt Ste. Marie, Mich. 

M.nnisrtee, Mich. Slicboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Monomlnee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



"Workers Cannot Stop Advancing." 
President Goinpers was given an ova- 
tion by the delegates to the recent New 
York State Federation of Labor, after a 
spirited speech in which the A. F. of L. 
executive recounted the upward march of 
organized workers. He complimented 
President Wilson in requesting the Amer- 
ican people to maintain a neutral position 
on present European affairs, and while 
expressing labor's well known position on 
the horrors of war, the unionist made this 
significant declaration : 

"We, in this country, are looking for an 
unparalleled era of prosperity as a result of 
the war. I am sorry that it has to come at 
the expense of others. But when this pros- 
perity comes, the workers must profit in 
their full share. It must not be a one- 
sided prosperity. No other result will satisfy 
us. The great labor movement must go on. 
We couldn't stop if we wanted to." 

Other portions of President Gompers' 
speech follow : 

"The history of toil is just emerging 
through the haze of the ages. 

"The people are just beginning to learn 
the details of the misery and privation suf- 
fered by the toiling masses in the great 
struggle of the past. In history it would 
appear that war and struggle of the thrones 
for supremacy and aggrandizement was all 
there was of these great struggles. The 
real story is just reaching the surface and it 
is ju-st becoming known that back of these 
battles was the constant struggle of the 
masses to throw off the yoke of oppression. 
P)eginning with the serfs, then the reforma- 
tion, then came the struggle of 1776 with its 
declaration of independence, later the Civil 
War with its battle for the freedom of the 
slaves, and next the war with Spain and its 
object the freeing of men from the tyranny 
of a king. .\11 of these were the struggles 
of the masses for a brighter and a better 
day. So it is with labor's battles. Like the 
wars of the past, it is a rough hard struggle, 
but when all is done, the roughness is for- 
gotten and the nobility of the cause and its 
achievement will be inscribed in the memo- 
ries of man. 

"No move in all history compares in im- 
mensity in the upward reach for humanity 
as the organized labor movement. It is not 
a battle for conquest but one for the unfold- 
ing and development of the best there is in 
the human race for the greater benefit of 
society. We ask now for an opportunity to 
make .still better conditions and better lives. 
We labor that we may not only have just 
the bare necessities of life, but also an op- 
portunity to secure for ourselves and those 
who come after us the highest development 
of our mentality that we may better exercise 
our sovereign rights as citizens of this repub- 
lic in which all men are equal, theoretically, 
at least. 

"Our laws of protection, those that safe- 
guard us from machinery, the laws compell- 
ing sanitation in the workshop and those 
that save us from fire and what not, apply 
to every working man whether he be union 
or non-union. Our work is for the benefit 
of all the workers. Sometimes we drag the 
non-union worker out of the mire of his 
misery or away from the indifference created 
by the employer. All the work of organized 



labor reflects its benefits on every one in 
ihe civilized world. 

"I recall a few years ago when we at- 
tempted to secure the attention and consid- 
eration of the President and the Vice-Presi- 
dent, the president of the Senate and the 
speaker of the House of Representatives 
They turned their backs upon us until we 
told them that we would hold them responsi- 
ble for the failure of our measures and then 
there was a- sudden change in front. When 
we hold every official in the administrative 
and legislative branches of our government 
in the Nation, State, and city so responsible, 
there is always a change in the attitude to- 
ward labor. 

"E-ven the courts have moderated their 
views to meet the enlightenment which has 
reached the public mind. The Supreme 
Court of the United States only a few weeks 
ago, for the first time in the history of the 
world, proved that this is true. Its decision 
in the Harvester case declared that the law 
in question which differentiated between a 
big corporation and the nurses of infants was 
constitutional, thus laying down the principle 
for wliich we have been contending and fight- 
ing for the last twenty-five years. 

"It all takes time. We can't convert the 
world in a twinkling of an eye. We have 
to fight the transportation men ; those who 
transport information and those who publish 
information. They are all prone to antag- 
onize our work, thinking that by so doing 
they are interrupting our progress, the prog- 
ress of something which they imagine to be 
inimical to their interests. We are at least 
twenty years in advance of the lawmakers 
of the nation. As an example take the fight 
for the Australian secret ballot. I well re- 
member how, up until fifteen years ago. it 
was possible for the employer to take his 
men in droves to the polls and direct their 
vote. Then came the secret ballot. It did 
not do away with the evil, but it helped. 

"Next came that period when signs were 
posted in the work shops and factories tell- 
ing the workers that they were expected to 
ca.st their ballots in a certain direction. I 
wish to say right here that not one of those 
signs was permitted to remain up for more 
than a moment in any shop where labor had 
been organized. Other moves in the march 
of progress have been noted in the direct 
vote for United States Senators, a thing 
which we advocated for thirty years, and 
another item is the initiative, referendum 
and recall, which was originated in the brain 
of a member of Typographical Union No. 6 
thirty years ago. We have not yet reached 
the point where we can say that it has been 
done, but the initiative, referendum and re- 
call is coming as surely as this republic is 
established. 

"We of organized labor are bringing the 
message of peace and good will to the un- 
organized. Our work is going on uninter- 
rupted. We have already passed the 2,000,- 
000 mark and are still pressing on and on. 
We will continue our work until every wage 
earner is reached in the civilized world. 

"Interruption has come. It is on the other 
side of the ocean. It is awful to think of 
the bloody holocaust which has transpired 
there. I remember sitting in the Interna- 
tional Labor Congress at Paris five years 
ago and at that time I had the honor to ad- 
dress the representatives of the workers from 
all countries in the name of the workers of 
.\merica in the interest of universal peace. 

"I tell you that that convention meant 



something to the king upon his throne. It 
showed that the ancient belief in the Divine 
right of kings was growing dim. The rulers 
knew that it meant the democratization of 
the world if the doctrine of peace should 
triumph. They determined to stop it if they 
could, so they plunged the world into war. 

"I have great respect for the proclamation 
issued by our President urging everyone to 
be calm in this time of war. It behooves 
every American who loves his freedom and 
justice to hope that out of this war will 
come the democratization of the civilized 
world. Imagine if you can the awful pic- 
ture of war in Europe in which the best 
blood of the land is being shot down and 
in which the weak and ill are left at home, 
not only to suffer the great evils of the war, 
but to continue the race. I cannot express 
the great sorrow I feel at this great catas- 
trophe. It has set back the labor movement 
for a long period. The greatest movement 
for good in the world, the church not ex- 
cepted, has been interrupted. And at the 
end of strife, unless .some great ideal has 
arisen to lead the hosts of toil, the workers 
who are left will find themselves in the grip 
of those who believe in the rule of steel and 
by shot and shell." 

At the conclusion of the address a dele- 
gate said : 

"We heard President Gompers say that he 
was not a regularly elected delegate to the 
convention. I move that this convention, by 
a rising vote, make him a regular delegate, 
not only to this convention, but to all others 
in the future." 

There were a hundred seconders and the 
vote was put and carried unanimously. 



Can't Draft U. S. Citizens. 

There is no way in which a foreign nation 
can compel a naturalized citizen of this coun- 
try to leave the United States and enlist in 
the army of his native country, is the sub- 
stance of an official statement by Secretary 
of State Bryan, in answer to numerous 
queries. 

"The United States holds," says the Sec- 
retary, "that no naturalized citizen of this 
country can rightfully be held for account 
for military liability to his native land sub- 
sequent to immigration therefrom, but this 
principle may be contested by countries with 
which the United States has not entered into 
treaties of naturalization. The latter coun- 
tries may hold that naturalization of their 
citizens or subjects as citizens of other coun- 
tries has no effect upon their original mili- 
tary obligations, or may deny the right of 
their citizens or subjects to become natural- 
ized citizens of other countries in the absence 
of express consent or without the fulfillment 
of military obligations. 

"It is important to observe that an alien 
who declares his intention to become a citizen 
of the United States does not at the time of 
making such declaration, renounce allegiance 
to his original sovereign, but merely declares 
that he intends to do so. Such person does 
not, by his declaration of intention, acquire 
the status of a citizen of the United States." 



Arbitration is a business, not a moral, 
proposition. It will grow in favor with 
the employer in proportion as the employe 
demonstrates his ability to make the other 
method the more costly. 



Compulsory arbitration : The strangest 
god in the empyrean of the longed-for. 



itf^X^lf^ 



Tc^rsxx.', 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WHAT HAASE SAID. 



Much has been said and written about 
the attitude of the German Socialists 
toward the war. A Socialist member of 
the German Reichstag, named Haase, is 
said to have made a speech which has been 
construed to mean a Socialist endorsement 
of war. The New York Call recently 
published a translation of Haase's address, 
and a perusal of same makes it clear that 
no such construction can be placed upon it. 

The speech, delivered on August 5, fol- 
lows: 

"fu the name of my party, I have lo 
make the following statement: The hour 
of Destiny is at hand. The consequences 
of an Imperialistic policy, by which an era 
of competing armaments was inaugurated, 
through which the contrasts between the 
people became more pronounced, are now 
flooding Europe. The responsibility for 
this policy belongs to those who have fos- 
tered it. We decline it. The vSocial- 
Democracy has fought tooth and nail 
against this fatal development, and has 
tried to uphold peace by powerful demon- 
strations in all countries, with the full 
accord of our French brethren. These 
efiforts have been without avail. We face 
now the pitiless reality of war. It is not 
a question to decide for or against the war, 
but simply a question whether we shall 
ratify tlic means which are needed for the 
defense of the country. We must not lose 
sight of the millions of our fellow country- 
men, who, by no fault of theirs, have been 
whirled into this catastrophe. They will 
feel to the highest degree the horrible con- 
sequences of the war. Our wishes are 
with those who have been called to arms, 
no matter to what party they belong. We 
also think of the mothers who give their 
sons, of the women and children who lose 
their breadwinners. Before the eyes of our 
women and children is not only the anx- 
iety for their beloved ones, but also the 
fear of starvation. We shall soon have 
thousands of wounded and maimed sol- 
diers. To aid them, to relieve their need, 
ap])ears to us our most pressing duty. 
Should the Russian despotism which has 
stained its hands with the blood of the best 
of its people achieve a victory, our country 
and the freedom of its future would lose 
much, if not everything. It is our duty to 
obviate that danger and to liold our shield 
over the civilization and the independence 
of our country. Therefore we do what we 
have always promised ; in the hour of need 
we shall not fail our country. In this we 
feel ourselves in accordance with interna- 
tional Socialism, which always admitted 
the right of every country to national in- 
dependence and self-defense. In accord- 
ance with its teachings, we shall object to 
a war of conquest. It is our demand that 
this war must end as soon as we have the 
certainty that our country is secure, and 
must be ended by a peace which will make 
friendship between us and our neighbors a 
possibility, and we demand this not only in 
the interest of international solidarity, 
which has always been our article of faith, 
but also in the interest of the German 
people. vVc hope that the cruel lesson of 
this war will instill the love of peace and 
the ideal of Socialism, together with the 
horror of war, in many millions. And on 
the basis of these, our convictions, we agree 
to the appropriations as demanded by the 
government." 



PASS THE SEAMEN'S BILL. 



American registry for foreign built ships 
is not enough to restore a healthy merchant 
marine. The Swedish, Norwegian, or other 
neutral shii)ping has an advantage in low- 
priced crews that will deter foreign ship 
owners from American enrollment. The 
President has been given power to suspend 
temporarily our navigation laws, but that 
is a poor way for a law-abiding nation to 
proceed. We need a fixed policy along 
which to work; and that policy must give 
both the seamen and the ship owner free- 
dom. Ship owners must be free to buy as 
cheaply as their competitors; and seamen 
must have the liberties of all other labor, 
that of quitting their job when the ship is 
in port. 

Give the low-waged foreign crews the 
right to leave their ships in American ports, 
and immediately their wages will rise to 
the American level. American ship own- 
ers cannot compete in overseas trade un- 
less they have as cheap .ships and crews as 
their competitors, or a subsidy to equalize 
this difference. The ship registry bill has 
removed one handicap ; the La Follette Sea- 
men's Rill will remove the other. To give 
the President power to suspend the navi- 
gation laws is merely a temporary relief; 
and gains made under such conditions 
would largely be lost when peace returns 
to Europe. A merchant marine that is 
worth having can be built up only by bas- 
ing it on justice to all. — The Public. 



TRADE IN SKUNK FURS. 



The skunk brings annually to the trap- 
pers of the United States about $3,000,000. 
It stands second in importance only to the 
muskrat among our fur-bearing animals. 
The value of a skunk skin in the raw fur 
market averaged from 25 cents to $3.50 in 
December, 1913, and usually runs higher. 
Although this fur is not very popular in 
America, Europeans favor it because it 
wears well and has a luster which makes 
it rival the Russian sable in ajipearance. 
These facts are emphasized in a new farm- 
ers' bulletin (No. 587) now being sent out 
by the United States Department of Agri- 
culture, which may be had free on appli- 
cation by those who are interested in the 
economic value of North American skunks. 

London is a great market for American 
skunk skins. In 1858 over 18,000 skins of 
this animal were exported to London ; in 
1911, over 2,000,000. Although only a small 
percentage of our skins are now dressed 
and made up here, we have received in 
years past a good number of them back 
after they have been made up abroad, and 
many American ladies who would scorn 
to wear a skunk skin have been proud of 
their imported black marten or Alaska 
sable, which was mprely the American 
skunk fur more attractively labeled. 

The process of dressing the skunk skin 
and removing any lingering odor has been 
improving year by year, and meanwhile 
the fur has been gaining popularity. The 
present extreme scarcity of Russian sable, 
because of a law that forbi<Is the taking of 
that fur, favors the foreign market for the 
skunk, and even in this country the use of 
its skin is increasing. 



Leather pads have been patented to pro 
tect the knees of persons who kneel at 
work. 



LABOR'S eCONOMiC PLATroSii. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where tlie work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

S. The mimicipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCI.SCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock. P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel. Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNKR, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, W.Tsh., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wa.sh.. P. O. Box fi. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN KRANCISrO. Cal., 40 Clny St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



It is stated that over 3,000 workers 
in Pacific Coast shipyards have 
joined the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters within the past year. 

The State Federation of Labor 
of Oklahoma has secured an agree- 
ment with State officials whereby 
union labor throughout will be em- 
ployed on the State capitol job. 

Navy yard storemen, located at 
Somerville, Mass., have notified Sec- 
retary Morrison of the A. F. of L. 
that their local extends thanks to the 
A. F. of L. for assisting in placing 
these workers in group 5-B of the 
navy yard civil service. 

Municipal firemen in Portland, Ore., 
are asking that their twenty-four- 
hour day be reduced. They insist 
that in times when eight hours is 
the rule, they are entitled to a short- 
ening of their day. Unionists are 
aiding them to create public senti- 
ment. 

The plant of Brown & Co. of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., has resumed operations 
and signed the scale of the Amalga- 
mated Association of Iron, Steel and 
Tin Workers, whose oflficers are 
hopeful for greater gains in the near 
future. A new local of the Amalga- 
mated has been formed at Gananoque, 
Ontario. 

Canada's system of dumping immi- 
grants into large cities is opposed 
by John Keane, of the Ottawa chari- 
ties department, who insists that the 
government should put these immi- 
grants on farm lands in western 
Canada. He says that a large pro- 
portion of the new comers are agri- 
culturists and ill fitted for city or in- 
dustrial life. 

President ]\Taurer, of the Pennsyl- 
vania State Federation of Labor, was 
arrested in Allentown, Pa., while at- 
tempting to deliver a public address 
in defiance of the mayor's orders to 
keep all thoroughfares clear of 
crowds. It is announced that the 
mayor's right to make this order, 
which denies the right of free speech, 
will be tested in the courts. 

American Federation of Labor 
Federal Union No. 12794 of Roundup, 
Mont., is forcing the Two Miracle 
Concrete Corporation to comply with 
the eight-hour law for smelter work, 
municipal work and all work under 
ground. One foreman has been fined 
$100 and the corporation's trial is 
now on. This concern does a gen- 
eral concrete business in Wyoming, 
Idaho and Montana. 

The Court of Appeals of Georgia 
has held in the case of Jones vs. 
Belle Isle that the pursuit of one's 
ordinary calling on Sunday, except 
for necessity or charity, is illegal, 
and that a contract made on that 
day in furtherance of the ordinary 
calling of one of the contracting 
parties could not be enforced. The 
court made this decision in the case 
of a man who rented automobiles 
and who sued to recover hire for 
Sunday pleasure riding. 

A new trial has been denied to 
Blackie Ford and H. D. Suhr, sen- 
tenced for life for the murder of 
District Attorney E. T. Manwell of 
Yuba county in the Wheatland hop 
riots last fall, in a decision handed 
down by the Appellate Court at 
Sacramento on September 10. They 
appealed on the ground that they 
did not have a fair trial, due to the 
prejudice in the county against them. 
Ford is confined in the Placer Coun- 
ty jail and Suhr in the Yuba County 
jail. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 

DAY AND NIGHT 

202-4 GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DOCK SEATTLE, WASH. 



EureKa, CaL 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building— New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
PostofBce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to 
call or have their mail forwarded during 
that period, they should notify the Agent 
to hold mail until arrival. 

Anderson, P. F. Maas, R. 

Andersen, RagnvaldMathisen, Nils 
Andersen, A. -1777Marx, Rhorv'ald 
Aylward, J. Mickelsen, M. D. 

Aifredsen, Andrew McDonald, Wm. 
Albers, Geo. Manson, Sven 

Anderson, Gust W. Merkle, G. 
Anderson, Julius L..Nass, John 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 
At 

WESTCRMAN & SCHERMER 

( 220-222 1 

Two Stores) 103-105-107 P^t Ave. So. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 




Seattle Navigation School 

Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade; Master. 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 
By 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
GrauviiLR ,,1 Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master and 
Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor in Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment," Au- 
thor of "Practical Hints for Yachtsmen 
and Amateur Seamen." 
Compass Adjuster. 

WASH. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy 'Si Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the 
Beauty," the "Princess" and 
high grade union-made cigars. 



'Little 
other 



Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
.Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
.\lso bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
I-ager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SEATTLE, 
Res. Phone: Queen Anne 



664 



Bekker, Geo. 
Benter, Henry 
Bruin, B. de 
Bruce, Robert 
Bode, Fred 
Bye. Sigurd 
Backman, A. 
Campbell, Frank 
D. M. 

Davis, F. A. 
Doddy, C. W. 
Engstrom, Carl 
Kriksen, C. -872 
Erikson, Erik 
Eriksen, John 
Eriksen, E. 
Fredriksen. 
Gjolseth, I. 
Griger, Joe 
Gundersen. Peter 
Graae. P. C. 
Hansen. John 
H.irdcasle, W. 
Hellisen, H. 
Kernes, K. 
Herman, Gus. 
Herman. Axel 
Hood, W. 
Hager, P. B. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hagger, F. W. 
Jahnke, Otto 
Jensen, Hans - 
.Tohnson, .Tulius 
Jonson. Alfred 
Jnhansen, Arvid 



Nelsen, Bernt 

Nielsen, N. C. -544 

Nilsen, Andrew 

Naro, H. 

Nase, A. Knudsen 

Nielsen. H. J. 

Olsen, B. -597 

Olsen, E. -966 

Olson, C. 

Olsen, A. M. 

Olsen, Martin 

Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Paulsen, G. L. 

Petersen, S. A. 

Preuss, F. -234 

Paaso, A. 
Harold Peltzon. .Jacob 

Petterson, Harry 

Rasmussen. P. A. 

Roche, John 

Rasmussen, Arthur 

Riech, F. 

RIech, J. 

Rose, W. H. 

Samuelsen. Hugo 

Shepard, Peter 

Sunde. Peter 

Sohankat. Hans 

Slmminghjem, G. 
-315Saar, I. A. 

Saunders, R. 

Sheppard, Stewart 
2062Skubber, H. 

Stover, Harry 

Stuhr. H. 

Sundberg, K. K. 



Johansen, Geo. W. Sund, K. A. 
Johnson. Kilmer Svensen. Ted 
Kallio, F. Svery. Carl 

Kennidy, Tom Tiedeman, .Toarhim 

Krouss, Ernest Totz. R. 

Kristiansen. TrygveTahlinen, M. 
Kristlanscn. K. F. Thorsen. Knut 
Knutsen, Knut Tahtl. Hjalmar 

Kruger, .T. Tomis. Frank 

Tjavsen. Hans -1595 Toosen, Theo. 
T^abouple. J. P. Van Loo. E. 
Larsen. L. A. Wehde. F. 

Ljungstrom. Steen Wison. P. L. 
Limdberg, Jerry Wenikke. A. 
Lynn. C. Wold. Statius 

Luwold, Nils Wettland, Johan 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next door to Master Mates and Pilots 

Conducted by CAPT. H. S. SMITH, 

Who for four years was Assist. Ins. of 

Steamboats in Seattle 



Herman Schuize 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



^N^^^^S^^W^V^^WVWWS^VWS/%^S^V%/WV^'W»i 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Anderson, John 
Almkvist, Emll 
Corty, Casar 
Dobbin, Harry 
Doering, E. W. 
Englund, Gust E. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Iversen, Iver 
Johansson, Charles 



Line, Wiktor 
Melgail, M. 
Murphy, Daniel 
Nllsson, Teodor 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Paterson, John 
Pettersson, C. H. 
Voss, H. 

Johannsen, Christian Whermann, William 
Karthauser, Otto Wilbrandt, Harry 
Linea, W. 



Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni. 
who has important news from home. 
.^rldress, Mrs. Minni Hall. Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

If Axel Olson and John Swanson, 
who in the autumn of 1902 were 
members of the crew of the steam- 
schooner "Fulton," will send their 
present addresses to John Gabrielson. 
Bellflower, Calif., they will receive 
news that will be of interest to them. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuana" in September, 
1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Littra B. Nystrama St., Goteborg, 
Sweden. — 5-13-14. 

Carl Julius Carlson, born in Swe- 
den in 1877, is inquired for by his 
mother. There is about $2000 due 
him from his father's estate. Last 
heard of in September, 1902, on the 
Atlantic Coast. Previously sailed on 
the "Clifford" between St. Johns and 
New York. Address Fru Sophia 
Carlson, Klubbegard, Hallands Lan, 
Heberg, Sweden. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PAI>MER, Proprietor 

A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand— Sailors' Hall— 553-R 

EUREKA 



^^^^^^^^'^^^^^^>^^^^^^^^^N^^W^'«^V%^^'V^'^^^^I 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List 



Ereksen, Anton 
Ellison, Sam 
Englund, Gust 
Hansen, Harald 
Hansen, Harry 
-1827 (Photo) 



Haldorsen. Adolf 
Ingebrethsen. Alfred 
Lawrence, Harry 
Lomas, Richard 
Thorssen. Fred'k. N. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Andrew Wilne, native of Dundee. 
Scotland; about 28 years of age, dark 
complexion, last heard of about nine 
years ago, sailing as steward, also 
as fireman, is inquired for by his 
relatives. Address A. S. Milne, 1122 
Rose street, Grandview, Vancouver, 
B. C. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson & 
Co. at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 



_AS.gM3f IB^^^^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



Portland, Ore. 
WlTloHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Slioes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. J^ain8295^^ROSENSTEIN 

Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland. Ore. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, A. -1645 
Anderson, Gust. 

-1808 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Andersen, Mike 
Bergman, Karl W. 
Berglund, Ed. 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Brun, Mathias 
Bults, Ernest 
Bakkersen, Peter J. 
Carlsen, J. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Carlson, C. Erland 
Campbell, Frank 
Dahl, Henry 
Deswert, William 
Day, Aca 
Danielsen, Nils J. 
Edstrom, John 
Erman, A. 
Ekham, Frans 
England, E. 
Freltag, Franz 
Fristrom, S. 
Geiger, Josef 
Gordia, Piet 
Gynther, John 
Gravier, Eugene 
Grell, Ben 
Hansen, Max O. 
Henriksson, William 
Hellman, Albin 
Henricks, Woldemar 
Hedlund, Albert 
Holm, Aage 
Huneig, Hans 
Hansen, H. F. C. C. 
Johansen, Chris 
Jansson, L. -2166 
.lohansson, Arvo 
Jacobson, A. 



Karlson, August 
Kluge, Frank 
Kelly, Patric 
Laine, Frank 
l>arsen, John 
Lewik, Karl 
Lutzen, Wald. 
Mathson, Nils 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Maass, R. 
Meckerman, Ernest 
Marx, Thorwald 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Moberg, Karl 
Nelssen, C. J. 
Nilsson, Axel 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Narberg, John 
Olsen, Arthur 
Olsen, Ansgar 
Olson, J. W. 
Olsen, John Andreas 
Phillip, Max 
Petterson, Einar 
Peterson, Hans 
Petersson, M. 
Pettersson, W. H. 
Pelz, Gottfried 
Pohland, Max 
Petersen, John 
Rautio, Jacob 
Reincke, Herman 
Rhodes, F. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Simens, O. L.. 
Scott, James 
Schulz, Alfred 
Wieprecht, Ernest 
Welsen, J. 
Walter, John 
Woldhouse, John 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Andersen, -1118 McLean, H. 

Arnell, John 

Andersen, F. C. 

Andersson, Geo. 

Behn, Alfred 

Bowen, J. J. 

Burkland, John 

Breien, Hans 

Butler, J. B. 



Martin, James 
Mackenzie, Hector 

G. 
Malm, Gus 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsen, Oswald, -1059 
Peterson, Axel 



Christensen, Albert Pettersen, Karl 
Christensen, F. R. Petersen, J. 
Christensen, Hans Pettersen, Olaf 

p. Peter, V. 

Christiansen, -1093 Peterson, Nels 
Ernandes, Frisco Rundblad, Oscar 



Eriksson, -333 
Elenlus, Axel 
Evanger, Nils 
Fuller, J. H. 
Forde, S. C. 
Graf, Otto 
Heinlg, Johann 



Sim, Gunder 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Sorensen, -1607 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Sundberg, John 
Schacht, Hein. 



Hansen, Ove Max Sormato, Mattl 



Hansen, C. F. 
Junge, Heinrich 
Jacobson, Arthur 
Johansen, Hans 
Knudsen. R. E. 
Kinnunen, A. 
Kyrkslatt, L. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Lolnlng, Hermand 



Schlachtl, Alf. 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Udby, Harold 
Walder, Olsen N. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 



Lengtssen, Gottfried MacGuire, O. F. 
Laine, Herman Solberg, Peter 

Lorsin, G. L. Stanners, W. S. 

Larsen, Lars 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, age about 44, is en- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 7-22-14 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

^S^4 UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 




'^^eJifER^' 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News ® Drug Co. 

Headquarters 

SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. WISKAH STREET, ABERDEEN 
SMOKE 

"ThinK of Me" and 
"White Squadron" 

CIGARS 

Made by 

L. L. MALEY, Aberdeen, Wash. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Headquarters for 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

420/2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS. 



LEADING JEWELERS 



Have Moved to 

318 E. HERON STREET 

Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $L50 up 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 







i^mm 



m 

Co 



This Book Free 

If you want to know more 
about Navigation, we will 
send this book free to you. 
It tells how young men have 
advanced to better positions 
— how they have climbed 
from small begiuniugs to 
the highest positions of 
master and officers of sea- 
going craft. It is an inspir- 
ing booklet. 

Mark and mail this coupou 
today. 



iDternallonal correspondence Schools * 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. * 

PIcaae send me your tree booklet, explaining * 
Coursci in Ocean, Coast, and Lake Naviiratlon. ^ 

Name * 

1 ♦ 
St.&No ♦ 

City ? . 



Home News. 



.State_ 



The twenty-first case of bubonic 
plague was reported at New Orleans 
on August 28. 

President Wilson has issued a 
proclamation calling on the people 
of the United States to pray for 
peace in Europe. 

The limit on individual postal sa- 
vings deposits was increased to $1000 
by a bill finally passed in Congress. 
The Government will pay interest 
on deposits up to $500. 

It is predicted that the value of 
the rice crop in Butte County, Cal., 
this year will reach a million dollars. 
It is expected there will be fully 
500,000 sacks harvested. 

The first ship to be registered 
under the American flag and the pro- 
visions of the recently enacted ship 
registry law is said to be the "Mol- 
degaard," built in Norway in 1900 
and owned by the Ocean Freight 
Line of New York. 

The Vancouver German Press has 
been suppressed by the police in 
consequence of its pro-German tone 
and the publication of what it terms 
great German victories. The editor 
states that the paper will resume 
publication after the war. 

The possibility of flour at $10 a 
barrel in the United States next win- 
ter will, among other things, serve 
to recall the fact that flour in the 
United States brought $20 a barrel 
fifty years ago next winter, and that 
the country met and successfully 
passed even that crisis. 

Steps were taken by the War De- 
partment to ascertain the manner in 
which the $200,000 Salem, Mass., re- 
lief fund, voted by Congress, might 
be disbursed for the greatest benefit 
of the greatest number. General 
Devol of the quartermasters corps 
has been sent to Salem to study the 
situation and to learn from the peo- 
ple themselves how best they can be 
helped. 

The Alaska coal land leasing bill, 
which is to work with the Alaskan 
railway law for the development of 
the coal resources of Alaska, has 
been passed by the House of Rep- 
resentatives. The bill provides a 
leasing system for Alaskan coal beds 
under a royalty of two cents a ton. 
It particularly affects the Bering coal 
fields, comprising 32,000 acres, and 
the Mattanuska coal fields, compris- 
ing 40,000 acres. The Government 
railway will furnish the means of 
transportation for "opening up these 
resources. Royalties are to go into 
a special fund for developing Alaska, 
particularly its railways. 

In agreeing on a war revenue 
measure which will tax freight trans- 
portation and increase revenue taxes 
on beer and domestic wines. Demo- 
crats of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee paved the way for relieving 
the Government's financial strin- 
gency due to the European war. 
Administration leaders in both houses 
predicted the bill as framed would 
be passed without prolonged discus- 
sion. The bill contemplates an an- 
nual revenue estimated at $107,000,- 
000. The tax on beer will be in- 
creased from $1 to $1.50 a barrel; 
wines will be taxed an additional 20 
cents a gallon, and a 3 per cent, tax 
on freight transportation bills, in- 
cluding railroad, steamship and ex- 
press freight will be made, transpor- 
tation companies to collect the tax 
for the Government and receive as 
compensation 1 per cent, of the 
amount of revenue collected from 
the tax. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



New Zealand shippers have per- 
suaded their Government to enter 
the insurance field, and it has agreed 
to take up to 60 per cent, of any 
risk on British steamers to or from 
New Zealand provided the compa- 
nies with offices in the Dominion 
will agree to take 40 per cent. Rates 
are to be based upon those charged 
by the Imperial war risks department. 

William Livingstone, president of 
the Lake Carriers' Association, has 
informed the United States Depart- 
ment of Commerce that the Lake 
vessels of Welland Canal size which 
might be available for ocean com- 
merce probably would represent an 
aggregate not in excess of 50,000 
tons and that most of the carriers 
which could be taken through the 
canal locks are owned in Canada 
and may be made use or by the 
Dominion Government. 

Within a few days the Lakes will 
have seen the last of the little 
wooden passenger steamer "Fre- 
mont," which has operated on nu- 
merous Lake excursion routes. Uni- 
ted States local inspectors at Detroit 
have authorized the owners to take 
the "Fremont" to Dubuque, la., by 
way of Green Bay, Cox River, Lake 
Winnebago and the Two-cousin 
River to the Mississippi River. The 
"F'remont" will be placed on a Mis- 
sissippi River excursion route. 

Bids for the construction of the 
new $225,000 revenue cutter which is 
to replace the "Woodbury" on the 
Maine coast, will be asked for by 
the Treasury Department at Wash- 
ington. As soon as the contract is 
placed work will be rushed and it is 
expected that the new cutter will 
be ready for service in one year 
from tlic time its construction is 
begun. The "Woodbury" will then 
be removed from service and will 
either be sold for less strenuous 
use elsewhere or destroyed for scrap. 

Under proclamation of the Gover- 
nor-General-in-Council, the Canadian 
naval authorities are empowered to 
requisition any British ship or Brit- 
ish vessel as defined in the Merchant 
Shipping Act, for such period of time 
as may be necessary on condition 
that the owners of all ships and ves- 
sels so requisitioned shall receive 
payment for their use, and for serv- 
ices rendered during their employ- 
ment in the Government service, and 
compensation for loss or damage 
thereby occasioned, according to 
terms to be arranged as soon as 
possible after the said ship has been 
taken up, either by mutual agreement 
between the authorities and the own- 
ers or failing such agreement by 
the award of a board of arbitration. 

Secretary Daniels has signed the 
contract plans for the three new 
battleships authorized by Congress 
this year. These ships, to be named 
the "Californian," "Mississippi" and 
"Idaho," will be the largest battle- 
ships as yet designed for the United 
States Navy and their cost, exclusive 
of armor and armament, has been 
limited to $7,800,000 each. The new 
.'-hips will be 41 feet longer and have 
4.500 tons greater displacement than 
those of the "Nevada" class, launched 
this month, and their speed will be 
21 knots, compared with 21^ for the 
"Nevada" class. The plans call for 
vessels 624 feet long, of 97-foot 
beam, 30-foot draft and 32.000 tons 
displacement. Their batteries will in- 
clude twelve 14-inch guns, four sub- 
merged torpedo tubes and twenty- 
two 5-inch rapid-fire guns. 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

52 EAST STREET. Opp. Ferry Depot, San Francisco 
JOE WEISS Telephone Kearny 3771 

Union Made Shoes 

FOR MEN EXCLUSIVELY 

NEW STORE! NEW GOOD SI 

NEW MACHINERY! 

Call and Inspect our new up-to-date quarters 

Repairing done while you wait by the latest machinery 

Work called for and delivered 

We use only the best leather market affords 

We can save you money by purchasing your next pair of shoes from us. 





Phone Douglas 198 



UNION LABEL USED 



NOVELTY TAILORING CO. 

Third Floor Phelan Building 
760 MARKET STREET 



WORKSHOP CUTTING DEPT. SALES DEPT. 

Room 325 Room 327 Room 329 

Represented by F. SELANDER. Assistant Secretary 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
I'nion Oflico are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt. Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



' Abrahanisen, Anton 

Ahl. Theo. 
'Abolin, Chris. 
lAdolfsson, Fritz 

Albertson, Chris 
I Albons. Arney 
I Alexandcrsen, Paul 
'Allen, William 
; Andersen, A. 

Andersen, Andrew 
I Andersen, Arnfeldt 
I Anderson. Edvard 

Andersen, Heney 

Andersen, Nela 

Haardsen, T. 
I naars, Hans 

Backman, Axel 

Ual<kenson. P. J. 
' Hans. Maurltz 
, Bauer. Andrew 

Heausang. Eugene 

Behr. H. 

rseimeir. Peter 

Bendfeld, Charley 
I Bensen, Dick 

Berg. John 
I Bergbalm, Edward 

BPiBMvi.st. E. -1395 

BerKStrom, A. 
I Berntsen, Julius 

Callon, Josh. 

Campbell. D. C. 
I Crrmpbell. Geo. 

Carlson, C. Erland 

Carlson, John 

Carlson. Joseph 
' Cm ry. ppter A. 

Carter, Sidney 

lialf-n. Wm. K. 

IXillman, H. 

U.Tiibbs. Paul 

Tavis. Frank A. 

n.nVs. Gala 

Pehler. Alfred 
I 1 eis-ng. Ernst 

E.nt^n. William TI. 

Edolf. O. 

Edolf, K. 

Eeuers. John 

Ehlert, Ernest 

Ellsworth, .lames 

Elofson. John 

Elone, Emanual 

Enstrom. Carl 

Faulkner, J. 

Finn, Cl.as. 

Fitzpatrick. P. 

F.iellman. Jonas 

Folvik, Lewis 
iFredholm. C. J. F. 

Fredlksen, B. D. 

Gaby. J. 

Gasoh. William 

Glass. W. 

Grnnstrom. Nestar 

Grigoleit, Ed. 

Gronnevick, Isack 

I Haave. Norvald 
I Haggar. Fred 
Hakonsson, Ingvar 
^ Halbniberg. Giistaf 
TTallowes. Louis N. 
, Halvarsen. H. 
Halvnrsen. Isack 
Tlalvnrsen. Olaf 
Mank. A. E. 
Hansen. Bernhard 
Carl 
C T 
Hans M. 
H. C. 
Hilmar 
H. P. 
Jerry 
J. -2151! 
Teremlas 
Xirk 
Olnf 
Oscar 
Thomas 



Hiinsen, 
Hanson. 
Hansen, 
^'ansen, 
Hansen, 
i^'ansen. 
Hansen. 
Hansen. 
Hansen. 
Hrir^en. 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hnn=on. 

Hanson. 



N. 



.\ndersen, Peder 
Andersen, K. P. 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Ernst 
Anderson, Sam 
Ander.sson, A. -1819 
Andersson, A. -1060 
Andersson, John 
Andreassen. Morgan 
Antonsen, Herni.in 
Apjielgren, John 
Arneike. Carl 
Attel. Alf 
Austin, Tom 
BJorselli. Knut 
Blanco, D. 
Hlucker. John 
Boers, M. 
Borgen. .lohn 
Bowman. William G. 
Boy, Geo. 
Brander, William 
Brennan, Patrick 
Broberg, C. 
Hrun, Mathias 
Bryan, .lohn 
Brynjulfson. Halvar 
Buaas, Thomas 
Bye. Sigurd 
B.vnum, Joe 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christensen. T. R. 
Cockell. Rrank 
Connolly, Stephen 
Costa, Casimiro 
Cord. P. 
Crosman, Geo. 

Oeswert, Willinm 
nigman. Carl A. 
Dius, F. 

Hohmann. Ferdinand 
I oose. Wm. 
Dreyer, Carl 

Ericson, Gust. 
PJriksen, Bernhard 
Eriksen. Kar A. 
Erikson. -S80 
Erikson, E. 
Erikson, Zure 
Esklldsen. A. P. 
Eriksson, Artur 
Evans, Stanley C. 
Freiberg, P. 
Frifke. W. 
Friedland. C. J. 
Srikson, G. 
French, .lack 
Frltsch, L. 

Guliksen, Amandus 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gustansen. Olaf 
' Iiistafson. r:iic 
Gustafsson. Ivar 
Gutman, Charles 

Hansson. Harold 
Haws. Arthur 
Heckel, Max 
Heldal. 'I"i vgve 
Hellsten, Gus. 
Helpap. August 
Henrv. H A. 
Hetebruegge. W. 

-Ift'^S 
Hewitt. Peter 
Hiks. Gustav 
Hilke, Karl 
Hogelim d . * n d re w 
Holgaard, Hans 
Hollnian, Mirf'n 
Holmlnnd. .\rthur 
Holm, Carl 
Holm. S. 
Hoist. R. 
Hovring, H. .1. 
Hove. Honkon 
Hubner, C. F. W. 
"iibortr Emil 
Huse. Ed. 



Jackisch. Magnus Jakobsen. Ole 
lacHin, Carl Jamlsch. Ed W. 

Jaeobsen. Jolm Jansson, Fredrik 



Jensen, C. 
Jensen, Fredrick 
Jensen, Halvar 
Jensen. Hans 
Jensen. Harry 
Jensen, H. G. 
Jensen, Just 
Jensen, William 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johannesen, Einar 
.lohansen, A. 
Johansson, A. F. 
Joliansen, -ZOL'l 
Johansen. Alf. 
Johannessen, Anton 
Joliansen, Carl -804 
Johansen, Carl -ISl'S 
Johanssen, Carl -2094 
.loliansen. Eduard 
Janssen, H. 
Kaare, P. Juhl 
Kalkin, Fred 
Kallasman, E. 
Kallio. Frans 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kallos, Alex. 
Kalnin, E. 
Kargen, Fred 
Karlsen, Jakob 
Karlsen, Martin 
K.irsberg, V. 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Ka.sen, Frudu 
Kearns. N. 
Kesher. Karl 
Kiesow, Paul 
I..acy, Thos. E. 
Laponble, Jean P. 
Lapschies. Edward 
Larsen. A. L. 
Narsen. Georg L. 
Larsen, T. 
Larson, C. 
Larson, H. P. 
Lauger. Kobei I 
Leckscher, Henry 
-1684 



Johansen, Louis 
Johansen, S. W. 
Johansson, Aug. -280 
Johansson, Johan 



W. C. 
A. R. 
Bern Hard 
I). 
E. 
Einar 



O. 



Nagel, 


A. 


Nar, P 


. Niels 


Narup, 


Carl 


Nelsen 


Ernest C. 


Nelsoti 


Victor 


Nerby, 


Kristian 


Nerlin. 


Thos. 


Neubert, H. 


Niclsei 


, Ingolf 


Nielsen. L. 


Nllsen. 


U. J. 


Olieig. 


C. W. 


O'Connor. W. F. 


Olafsson. Melchoir 


Olmann, P. 


O'Neil, 


.):>s. 


Olsen, 


Alfred 


Olsen, 


Arne 


isen. 


Ferdinand 


Olsen, 


Geo. 


Olson, 


neo. \v. 


(ilsen, 


John A. 


Olsen, 


M. E. 


Olsen, 


N., -502 


Olsen, 


Ole -1047 


Olsen, 


Olaf 


Olsen, 


O. -1283 



Palm, A. 
Palmer. P. 
Parrell. William 
Partaner, Johan 
Paulsen, Alex. 
Paulsen, James 
Paiiltin. Martin 
Pearson, John L. 
Pearson, Victor 
Pedersen, Carl 
Podersen, Eilif 
Pedersen. Hans 
Pedersen. Halftan 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pederson, Sofus R. 
Perkins. Paul 
Petersen. -1564 
Petersen, H. -1560 
Petersen, .lohn A. 

Raalsen. Fred 
Ram berg. B. A. 
Rismussen, Andrew 
Rasmussen. E. 
Kavmonil. Frank L. 
Regan. .Tohn 
Repson. Ed. 
Richardson, E. 



Maatson, Olaf 
Madsen, C. H, 
Makeliir. Gusiave 
Maksnes. Kristian 
Maland. Ole J. 
Malmstrnm, C. A 
Maltti. J. 
Mpnss. Fred 
Markley, Paul 



Johnsen. 
Johnson 
Johnson, 
Jolinson, 
Johnson, 
Jolinson. 
Johnson. Jack 
Johnson, Jakob 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Pete 
Johnson, Robert 
Johnson, li. W. 
Jokstad. Sigurd 
Jones, Berthon 
Jorgensen, Aage 
Jorgensen, H. P. 
Kindlund, Otto 
Kine, Conrad 
Kiiwe, Kaarel 
Klatt, Herman 
Klebingat. Fred 
Klette. Ernst 
Klitiker. C. J. 
Knudsen. Lauritz 
Kohne, Ernst 
Konopacki. Martin 
Kristiansen. Hans 
Kristiansen. I, p 
Kristjan, A. W. 
Kroeger. Henry 
Kuhimann. Louis 

Lee. Ernest 
Leidecker, Elite 
Lewis, lioy li. 
Line. W. 
Linhquist, G. 
Lohne. E. 
Loining. Herman 
Lorense, W. 
Love. S. C. 
Lundherg, Torsten 
Lundblad, Ernst 

Nilsen, N. P. 
Nilson, Ragnard 
Nilsson, -1141 
Nordin. Gus 
Nordstrom. Wietor 
Novomiroff. M. 
Nurhanan, I, 
Nurml, Victor R. 
Nyman, A. 
Nyman, Oskar 

Olsen, Otto 
Olsen, Oswald 
Olsen, Paulus 
Olsen, Peter 
Olsen, Siegfred 
Olson, M, 
Olson, Marius 
Olson. S. 
Olson, Sam 
Ols.son. G. B. 
Olsson. C. G. -lini 
Olsson, James 
O'Neil, James 
Ossis, Andrew 
Ovarnstrom, H. 

Peterson, Mauritz 
Petersen, Olaf. -1595 
Petersen, S. A. 
Peterson. Soren 
Petterson, A. -16?'? 
Pettersen, F. -1526 
Pettersson, Oscar 

-1551 
Petz, Fritz 
Plllson, Eduard 
Plattner, A. 
Poppe, F. G. 
Porath, Ben 
Prannels. W. 
Prinz, Carl 
Publicatus, August 
Punis, Antony 
Puze, A. 

Richter, Niels 
Rlgnell, Joe 
Rimtner. Chas 
Robinsboom. E. 
Rosenfelld, A. 
Rnsenoiiist. A. 
Rulse. — 
Rydellus, Rolf 

204fiMarkman. Harrv 

Markmann, Helnrith 
Markus, Golf red 
Martenz, Paul -2262 
Martens, Paul 
Masters, C. 
Martensen, I. C.-2191 
Mathlsen, CharlPv 
Mathisen, Christian 



O. 



Mathiesen. Ludvig 
Malhsen, Olaf 
Matson, Henning 
Manse. Fred 
Mavar, J.ames 
Maves. J. B. 
McCann 

McConnell. David 
McKeating, R. 
MrKenna, F 
Mr-Ma I'on. J. T. 
Meincke, R. 
Meriult, Gaston 

.'^aarinen, Werner 
Saar, John 
Sager. Ed. 
.lalger. Julius 
Salvesen. S. 
Sancherd. Vincent 
Sander. Robert 
Sandseter, Paul 
Sandseth. O. 
■^anioR. Ben 
Saunders, .lames 
Scbeffler. Samuel 
Pehmidt, Berhard 
Schmidt. Louis 
Schroder. Friedrick 
Schulze. Paul 
S'Olt. Emil 
Seidel. Willi 
Pliallsrreen .Tohn 
'^hankat, Hans 
Shem, A. 
Sherry, J. H. 
Shields. J. .L 
Simmonds, J. 
= itnnnsen. Sigvard 
■sioblom. Karl A. 
^lennine. .Tocenh 
Smalmberg, Otto 

Tnminnn, Krispin 
a-nrnm-ila. Vaino 
Thai. R. 

Therain. .Tohn E. 
Tliomis. Edward 

TThlman. Axel 
T'lla. Ole. O. 

Vallentisen, George Velson. FrT^k 
^■nndp•■bers•. Geo. Verfard, Frank 
Van KatwLlk. J. W. 



Meyer, W. 
Miller, Herman 
Mogelherg. Harry 
Monsen, Martin 
Moore, C. C. 
Morris, Benjamin 
Morris. Oscar R. 
Morrison, Wm. 
Moure, i'oter 
Mueller. A. R. 
Miiddi. .-\. 
Murray, C. P. 



Smith. Percy S. 
Sogron, John 
Sonnenberg. J. C. 
Soderlund. T'no 
Sorby. Olaf 
Sorensen. C. J. T. G. 
Sorenscn, Peter 
Sorensen. Soren 
Staff. Andreas 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Sterling, H. 
Stoeker. .Tohn 
Stitman, F. 
Strandquist. I>. 
Strasdln, Hans 
Strauss, Walter 
Strom. Kahl 
Swansen, O. 
Swanson. Jack 
Swanson. Jo'n 
Swansson. Oskar 
.Swartlev. Norman 
Sundl, Oscar 
Sundberg. TC. T\. 
Simdharm. Fred 
Swensen. B. -1^3". 
Svensson, S. E. -2675 

Thompson. E. 
Thompson. Thomas 

Tillman 

Tobey. John 
Tornguist. M. 

T'Imar, .Tohn 



Wai'ner. W. 

■^^'Tbi J. 

\Vaidhousp. .Tohn 
Wallen. IvOuis 
Walleren T. M. 
"•ilsh. B. 
"•■m'lo^Md. .T 

Wedeking, William 
Weiss. V. 
""'f-lcrn. .Tulius 
Welson. R. 

Znnkert. TCarl 
Zimmerllng. Fred 



Weltz, Hille 
Weltz, Ornulf 
■"'erner. Paul 
■V^'estman. A. 
■^^-Ibick. Walter 
Wi.l.-.^trorn ^ntone 
■Wlllert. Charles 
Wilson. C. J. 
"Wimmer. Geo. 
■^'ind. .Tacob 
Wortman. Wm. 

7oovti -ufqUpr 
Zornlg. Harry 



PACKAGES. 

Apiilv to Secretary of Sailors' TTnlon 
-if the Pacific. 

.\nderson. A. T.aydon. ti. 

Anderson. Andrew Lundherg. Osknr 

Anderson. Axel M^hrtens. H. K. 
^thanasele. DemetreMlles, I. P. 

Peling. Oscar f^lsen, Arne 

Bode. W V. Olsen. Carl -1101 

Carter, IL Olsen. W. S. -1229 

Ceelan. .Tohn Raasch. O. 

stoffersen. Olaf Rarly, Frans. 



KU"''=<.n o>to 
Erlckson, F. 
■^inn'-lly. ^\"m. 
Giarth. Petrus 
Hansen. Karl 
Hansen. Marius 
Hendriksen. Hng- 

bart 
Johansen. Emil 
Johnson. R. W. 
.Torsrensen. Oluv 
'Alette. E. F. 
La as. J. 



K^smussen. Emi^ 
Rathke. Reinhold 
Relursen. A. T... 
Roslin. Ftobeit 
Sander. R. 
S'^hroder. Aug. 
Skelierev. A. 
Sorensen. Pete 
Summers, J. J. 
Thorsen. .Tens 
Wakelv. B. E. 
■Walters. Albert B. 
Wurthman. W. T.. 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 
."Kpply to Superintendent on premises 

TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET, near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCM.rsiVE fNION 

TAILOR (i.N I'lIE FRON'l' 

'Nuf Sed 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
Vork. is inquired for by his mother. 
.Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name, 200 Fair Oaks 
ave.. Pasadena. Cal. 7-29-14 

John S. Bickel, a sailor supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his sister, who has 
important news for him. Address 
Laura Bickel. 8817 Birchdale Ave., 
Cleveland, Ohio.— 5-13-14. 



..^■SjgmJT] 



•^^^^H 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Buiiding, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and iVIarket Sts. 

Phione Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERiVIAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of tlie Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 
Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere street. 

June 30, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

For the six months ending June 30, 
1914, a dividend to depositors of 4% per 
annum was declared. 

Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washingfton 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



"Ale 

AND 

Porter 



Ifnion 

MADE 

5eer 




^d)o Of America ric:i>^ l 

COPYRIGHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 j 



^^ m Jt ^'-^ 'W^^" W~^ 'W^% ^r» See that this label (in light 
^^^ r^^l 11 1^^ [^^li^^^^%blue) appears on the box in 
^ '^'*' ~ * ^^"^ M"^»».^m-"^ ^'■'^ which you are served. 



t<n>nf.m 

Isvjed by AutAorit/ of tne Cigax MaKefS' ImecnatJonal Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

<nU$ (tntifif^ Ihit tin a^rt cMxti InUili to( («• b«Bi amf by* fiBtUBS VUkMH 

tmiaaof i»iooj*iuun'\iiJ[Kiunotiu.umo»t/ ^Mt.■kl. inwuitaiKiKlevotedntiieaiJ' 
nKictiioii of Ike MOMlXATKIMxid iNItlliiniAl WdlASI Of ntf OWn. nutbinmiKafat 
UWM Ci«an to «ll wt.<n UifOuahout Um mwI ' 



Ixartmi^atai 



' staiic 









D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 



HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



I 



k 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 

Phone Garfield 7833 E. Benvenuti, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: .25, .30 
and .50 per day. $1.25 per Week and 
up. Special rates for Housekeeping, 

Single or Connecting Rooms. 
This Place Must Be Seen to Be Appre- 
ciated. Nothing Like It in the City. 

1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

M. WICKS 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

60 STEUART STREET 

San Francisco 

Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 

DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Buiiding, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 5390 

ANCHOR HOUSE 



S. PETERSON, Prop. 

495 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Samuel Dickson, a seaman, aged 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
,Pa. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 

UlilSTOFOilO" 

Clear Havana Cigars 
of Highest Type 

UNION MADE 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



lOricksen, Earl 
Ericksen, O. E. 
Ericksen, Olie 
Elmi, A. 
Finley, Joe 
Georgeault, Joseph 
Grano, Gustaf 
Orabrovae. Anton 
Hallen, Victor 
Happmer, H. 
larona, Carmelo 
Johnson, Martin 



Johnson, John E. 
Janssan, J. Axel 
Larsson, Alech 
Lundqvlst, Frito 
Nleman, August 
Osterlund, Albert 
Olsen, John 
Petersen, Carl 
Petersen, H. 
Paltanen, Alex 
Wallin, E. 



Seattle, Wash. 



AboUn, Adam 
Borgen, K. Sigurd- 
sen 
Dahl, Ben. 
FIster, Johannes 
FInnlgan, I. H. 
Hagen, Gunder 
Jensen, Gustav 
Johansen, Ingvald 
Johnson, Axel 
Nelson, Nels Wll- 

helm 
Larsen, Fred 
Magnuson, P. A. 



Osterlund. Albert 
Olsson, Sigfrid 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phlster, Albert 
Polhome, Mr. 
Ridderstaff. Ernest 
Rye, F. M. J. 
Selback, Chris, 
sunning, Rasmus O. 
Spellman, Tom 
Starks, John 
Stein, George G. 
Stlxrud, Jack 
Stromsness, Oscar 



News from Abroad. 



Wh?n making purcha.ses from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



The Japanese House of Representa- 
tives on September 7 unanimously 
passed a war vote of $53,000,000 yen 
(about $26,500,000). 

A peace treaty with Peru was 
ratified by the United States Senate 
on August 20, this being the nine- 
teenth of the Wilson-Bryan arbitra- 
tion treaties passed upon. 

A public statement has been issued 
by A. Rustem Bey, Turkish ambas- 
sador, charging that the intimation 
by Great Britain to the United States 
that she would welcome the pres- 
ence of American war vessels in 
Turkish waters to protect Christians 
was merely a "vulgar trap" to get 
the United States "mixed in the 
European fray on the allies' side." 

Austria has severed diplomatic re- 
lations with Japan. She has also 
declared war on Belgium. To meet 
the Russian ' attack Austria weak- 
ened her army invading Servia to 
such an extent that the Servian 
forces have driven them entirely 
from their territory, and have made 
a counter move by invading Bosnia 
with 150,000 men. Prince William 
of Wied, who was nominated by the 
Powers to govern Albania, is re- 
ported to have fled his country. 
Neither Turkey nor Greece has yet 
declared war, though such declara- 
tion is hourly expected. 

Announcement was made by tlie 
British admiralty that the German 
armed merchant cruiser, "Kaiser 
Wilhelm der Grosse," of 14,000 tons 
and armed with ten 4-inch guns, had 
been sunk ofif the west coast of 
Africa by the British cruiser "High 
Flier." Announcement came at the 
same time of the destruction by the 
Russian fleet of the German cruiser 
"Magdeburg," which had run ashore 
on the Isle of Odensburg in the Gulf 
of Finland. Several ships have been 
blown up by floating mines in the 
North Sea. The British steamship 
"Holmwood," 4238 tons, was sunk off 
the Brazilian coast by the German 
ciuiser "Dresden." 

The Sacred College of Cardinals 
on September 3 elected Cardinal 
Giacomo Delia Chiesa, Archbishop 
of Bologna, Supreme Pontiff to suc- 
ceed the late Pope Pius X. His 
coronation as Benedict XV took 
place September 6. Immediately 
after his election the Pontiff said 
he could not imagine how his frail 
being was capable of enduring the 
enormous weight of responsibility 
thrown upon his shoulders, especially 
at a moment when all the countries 
of Europe were stained with blood, 
when the wounds inflicted upon hu- 
manity also were inflicted on the 
church, and when countless victims 
of the war were being cut down. 

Turkey has formally notified the 
nations of the world that she had 
abrogated the series of conventions, 
treaties and privileges originating as 
early as the eleventh century where- 
by foreigners in the Ottoman empire 
have been exempt from local juris- 
diction in civil and criminal cases, 
h'orcign subjects no longer will en- 
joy what is known as extraterritorial 
rights, through which they have been 
tried by their own judges, diplomatic 
representatives or consuls. This 
practice, abolished by Japan several 
years ago through the negotiation of 
new treaties, Turkey has removed 
by a stroke of the pen. Her pur- 
pose, it is declared, is to assert her 
independence and free herself from 
the domination of the great powers. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"Father, what is the Prussian 
diet?" 

"Rye bread and beer. Be quiet 
now, will you?" 



\yj"ft (pleadingly) — I'm afraid. 
Jack, you do not love me any more 
— anyway, not so well as you used 
to. 

Husband— Why? 

Wife — Because you always let me 
get up to light the fire now. 

Husband — Nonsense, my love! 
Your getting up to light the fire 
makes me love you all t(ie more. 



A bachelor of considcrqWe wealth 
was much sought after by many of 
the most charming youngrfWomen of 
the town. 

Minnie Rivers, a very pretty maid- 
en, was sure she. had brought him 
almost to the point of proposal. 

"What was the .happiest moment 
of your life?" she asked, while they 
were taking a moonlight stroll one 
evening. 

"The happiest moment of my life," 
answered the bachelor, with a rem- 
iniscent smile, "was when the jew- 
eler took back an engagement ring 
and gave me some cuff links in ex- 
change." 

Mr. Jenkins was talking with a 
young man whom he hoped might 
become his son-in-law. Wishing to 
encourage the young man, who had 
very little of this world's goods, the 
old gentleman said: 

"I am proud of my girls, sir, and 
there is nothing I would like better 
than to see them married to bright, 
smart young men. I have made con- 
siderable money and the girls won't 
go to their husbands penniless by 
any means. Now there's Belle, 25 
years old, one of the best girls in 
the..,world. I shall give her $10,000 
w'l^n she marries. Then next comes 
Caroline, who won't see 35 again, 
and I shall give her $20,000. And 
the man who marries Delia, who is 
forty, will have $30,000." 

The young man reflected for a mo- 
ment or so and then inquired: 

"You haven't got a daughter about 
50, have you?" 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two Individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY T.\YLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
wlio has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering tlie School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Cliarts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cat. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Clironometers and Se.xtants Rented 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING CO. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 
Phone Douglas 1737 



Demand the Union Label 



3 Issoad CjjniAutiuntji of tha i.^ oE 




Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 








Jqmu X 3ortns*n 



ONE BIG STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, WatchmaKers, Opticians 

No purchase too small to be appreciated. To prove this, we sell: 

ALARM CLOCKS, 45c UP WATCHES, $1.00 UP 

EYE GLASSES, 50c UP 



YOU Can Start a 

Bank Account 

With Only 

51c. 



T o u don't 
need one dollar 
to start a bank 
account when 
you have one 
of HALE'S Sa- 
vings Banks. 
It takes but 
50c to purcliase 
one of our com- 
pact little $1.00 
Banks, and one 
cent starts the 
account. 

Your savings will be just as safe 
from the temptation to open it on 
a moment's impulse as in a Savings 
Bank, because each Bank Is fitted 
witli a patented lock, the key to 
which we keep. Tliat Is the BIG 
FEATURE of these Banks. We will 
open it at any time upon presenta- 
tion at Transfer Desk — Main Floor — 
you do what you please with the 
money. 

These Banks are made of tempered 
steel, with neat oxidized copper finish. 
Inquire at Transfer Desk — Main 
Floor. 





Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 6 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
72 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

OAKLAND: 
1113 BROADWAY 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
0pp. S. p. Depot at Third <£. Townsend 



Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



CJBfFBlBl'EH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



TS' 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVIII, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1914. 



Whole No. 2296. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR. 



Secretary of Labor Wilson's Definition of "Labor" and "Capital." 



The question of relation between employer 
and employe is an acute one. It lias become 
more acute with our industrial and commercial 
development. Under the old regime, before 
the inventive genius of man had given us our 
modern machinery, the relationship between 
employer and employe was personal. The em- 
ployer came in contact, personal contact, with 
his einploycs, usually had but few of them, and 
never so many but that he knew the individu- 
ality of the men who were working for him 
and could deal with them accordingly. In- 
ventive genius and the machines growing out 
of that inventive genius have made it absolu- 
tely necessary that there should be an organiza- 
tion of capital in order that there might be 
the most efficient production. 

Some of the machines we now have in use 
and some of the systems necessary for the 
proper utilization of those machines would not 
be possible under the old forms. New forms 
had to be devised. Out of those new forms 
has grown our immense corporations, facili- 
tating the use of the machines, economizing 
here and economizing there by virtue of cen- 
tralized production and giving us more ef- 
ficiency in labor than we could have other- 
wise. But it has eliminated that personal re- 
lationship between the employer and employe 
that formerly existed, and, because of the elimi- 
nation of that personal relationship, complica- 
tions arise in dealing with the problems that 
grow out of our industrial development. There 
is not the same confidence between the em- 
ployer and employe, when neither knows the 
other, as there is when they know each other. 
Extremes of Thought and Action. 

The situation, then, has entirely changed, 
and, growing out of that change in situation, 
something is necessary in order to find a substi- 
tute for the old personal relationship that for- 
merly existed. When you come to deal with 
the problem, however, and seek for that some- 
thing which will take the place of the old per- 
sonal relationship, you are met at the thresh- 
hold with extremes of thought and extremes of 
action that hamper you in your efforts to find 
a solution, and you find amongst the working- 
men, amongst the wage workers, those who 
make the contention that because capital is in- 
animate, having no life, no intelligence, no 
energy, therefore, it performs no function in 
production, and, performing no function in pro- 
duction, is not entitled to consideration. 

Upon the other hand, you find the sentiment 
amongst employers that fails to recognize that 
their employes are different from ordinary ma- 
chines, a sentiment that looks upon ernployes 
as being but a part of the machinery in pro- 
ductioiv instead of living, moving, sensuous 
human beings like themselves, and who under- 
take to deal with the wage-worker, with the 
laborer, from the same standpoint and with the 
same kind of sentiment as they would deal with 
a machine. You have those two extremes, and 
yet what are the facts? 

What is capital? Capital is the unconsumed 
product of previous labor, mental and physical, 
as I have defined it before. It differs from 
wealth in this: that you may take a vacant lot 



out here on one of your streets, and that va- 
cant lot is wealth, but the moment you erect 
a building upon that lot, then the building is 
capital. All the machines that are used in your 
shops, all the machines that are used in your 
transportation, and all the buildings that you 
occupy, and that your workers occupy, are the 
unconsumed product of previous labor. They 
are capital, and the function that capital per- 
forms in production, and particularly in modern 
production, is that it furnishes the machine 
which makes labor more productive than it 
otherwise could be. It furnishes the shelter, the 
homes, in which the workers live. It fur- 
nishes the workers, in the form of wages, with 
the means of living, until those complex things 
upon which they are working are finished and 
ready for use. 

And aside from the mental work which must 
be classed as labor, the mental work on the 
part of the owner of the capitol, he conceives 
the idea of assembling at a common point, 
that is, the creation at a common point, of an 
industry, and he carries his organization out 
from that point. Aside from the intelligence, 
which is also labor, which directs the plant 
after it has been created; aside from the genius 
of the inventor, which is also labor, which im- 
proves the machinery from time to time; and 
aside from any of these functions on the part 
of the owners or controllers of capital, capital 
performs the important functions of furnishing 
the machines, being the unconsumed product of 
previous labor, of furnishing the shelter for the 
worker, and of furnishing the means of liveli- 
hood until that which the worker is laboring 
upon is ready for use. For performing these 
important functions in production it is entitled 
to the very highest consideration. 

Upon the other hand, labor is the vitalizing 
force. Labor, mental and physical, is the force 
that makes your capital available, that makes 
your machinery move, that makes your produc- 
tion possible. No matter how much capital 
you may have, unless in addition to your capital 
you have mental and physical labor available 
for use upon your capital you cannot produce 
another article for common use. So labor and 
capital have mutual interest in production; a 
mutual interest, not an identical interest. Mark 
the distinction. Notwithstanding the various 
schools of thought that have existed amongst 
those who have been connected with the labor 
movement, and with others, it is nevertheless 
a fact that they have a common interest, a 
mutual interest, in securing the largest possible 
production with a given amount of labor. 

Anyone who examines the history of this or 
any other country is bound to come to the con- 
clusion that the workers to-day are very much 
better off than the workers of two or three or 
four generations ago. We have our extremes of 
wealth, and we have our extremes of poverty 
to-day as we had then, but the great mass of 
the people between those two extremes of 
wealth and poverty are very -nuch better off 
in their material surroundings than our fore- 
fathers were. The principal reason why they 
are much better off than their forefathers were 
is that by the introduction of machinery there 



has been a greater amount of production, and 
because there has been a greater amount of pro- 
duction there is a larger share that can go to 
the wage-earners than went before that greater 
production took place: 

So you are mutually interested in securing 
the largest possible production with a given 
amount of labor. Your interests only diverge 
when it comes to a point of division of that 
which has been jointly produced, when it comes 
to the division of that which has been pro- 
duced as a result of stored energy in the form 
of capital, and the unstored energy in the form 
of labor. When it comes to a division of 
their joint product, there is a diversity of in- 
terest. Each is desirous of securing the largest 
possible share, and out of that desire to secure 
the largest possible share that can be secured 
come our industrial conflicts: 

Not having the personal relationship that 
we had before to mellow those contentions, 
they have become e-xtremely acute, and they 
not only affect those who are engaged in them 
but they affect all other portions of the com- 
munity who may not be directly engaged in 
the contest. When a dispute of that nature 
arises which results, or is likely to result in a 
suspension of operation in any given industry, 
the temper, the spirit, of both sides has been 
aroused. They are not so likely to listen to 
reason presented by each other as they would 
be if they were considering the proposition in 
calmer moments. 

Bringing Contending Parties Together. 

One of the purposes for which the Depart- 
ment of Labor has been created is to step in 
when that condition of affairs exists and offer 
its good offices in an effort to bring the con- 
tending parties together, in order to adjust their 
difficulties, because, if it has come to the point 
where a stoppage of work takes place, then it 
means an economic loss, a loss not only to 
the employers and employes engaged in the 
contest, but a loss to the entire community 
of forces that ought to be valuable in pro- 
ducing valuable economic results. 

When the Department of Labor steps in 
when a condition of that kind exists, the first 
step that should be taken is to endeavor to 
get those who are immediately interested in 
the contest to work out their problem them- 
selves. A great deal depends on getting them 
to work out their problems themselves. A 
great deal depends on getting them to realize 
the mutual interests they have, and if they can 
sit down around a council table and work out 
their problems on as nearly correct a mathe- 
matical basis as it can be arrived at, and the 
trouble is adjusted in that way, the spirit of 
co-operation which grows out of a condition of 
that kind is jjound to be beneficial in the car- 
rying on of the work in that particular plant. 

Failing to secure a mutual consent to con- 
sider their own problems and to deal with them 
and settle them, if they can, then it becomes 
the duty of the new department to act as a 
mediator, as a go-between, and to pass be- 
tween the employer and the employe, not for 
the purpose of imposing upon the particular 
views of the department, or the department 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



head, but lor the |>uri>osc <>l Irving to find sonic 
mutual basis, sonic basis upon which two parties 
can aprcr ami llicrchy eliminate tlir possible 
contest. 

l-ailing in ihal, llicii, to suggest to botli par- 
ties the advisability for their own interests and 
for the interest of the community of submit- 
ting the question at issue to arbitration, to 
some disinterested party. It is very much bel- 
ter to settle it themselves, but, failing to settle 
it themselves, then, in the interest of industrial 
peace, in the interest of the community at large, 
it is necessary' to submit the question at issue 
to disinterested parties and allow them to de- 
leriuHK- such question'^. 

Compulsory Arbitration Not Wanted. 

In prosposing that as a means of adjusting 
industrial disputes, I do 'not want to be misun- 
derstood. 1 do not want to be understood as 
proposing compulsory arbitration, because I do 
not believe in compulsory arbitration as applied 
to industrial disputes. In the first place it may 
do an injustice to the employer, if you have 
compulsory arbitration, by giving an award 
which if he is compelled to operate under would 
in time absorb all <'f his capital, it means that 
the whole subject matter of trade relations be- 
tween employer and employe may be thrown 
open at the suggestion of one of the sides to 
the controversy, and when you submit the 
whole question of relation to a board of arbi- 
tration, there is a possibility — I do not say 
that it is a probability — but there is a possi- 
bility that the award may be of such a nature 
that if it is lived up to, and the employer con- 
tinues to operate — and if he is not compelled 
to operate then it is not compulsory arbitra- 
tion — it would ultimately take all of his capital. 
Upon the other hand, an award might be of- 
fered under which if the employes continued 
to work they would be in little better condi- 
tion than that of serfs. 

There is one other very strong reason why 
ciimpulsorv arbitration should not be entered 
into, and 1 am free to state that that is purely 
from the standpoint of the wageworker, in 
that it would be unfair to the wageworker to 
have comrulsory arbitration. There is a clean- 
cut dividing line between profit and loss which 
the employer can show from his records to 
any board of arbitration that sits upon any 
question in dispute. He can demonstrate from 
his records, through that clean-cut dividing line 
between profit and loss, the conditions, and 
circumstances, and the terms under which it 
would be a loss to him to operate. That would 
act as a protection against any unfair decision 
being rendered as it applied to the employer. 
Hut the standard of living is not a clean-cut 
stationary line. The line of living is flexible. 
It may be either raised or lowered, and the 
workman still live. 

So the workmen can have no clean-cut di- 
viding line to protect them against any unfair 
decision on the part of arbitrators, and the 
only way in which either of them can be pro- 
tected in arbitration is by having the terms of 
the arbitration, the conditions of the arbitration, 
laid down in advance, and when a trade dis- 
pute has reached that stage where it is impos- 
sible to (ret the employer and the employe to 
come to'^ether and adjust their difficulties, then 
they ought to be induced to submit the dispute 
to arbitration, laying down the basis in advance 
which will protect both of them against any 
unfair or unjust decision on the part of the 
arbitrators. That is one of the functions of 
the Department of Labor, and that is one of 
the ways in which the Department of Labor 
can be of value to industry and commerce. — 
Address delivered bv Wni. B. \\ ilson, Secretary 
of Labor, to the National Chamber of Com- 
merce. 



\icc .\<lniiral Wa Mat.stinioto, of the Japa- 
nese navv, ha.'^ been sciiteiiced by a court 
martial to tliree years' iniprisonment on 
charges of accepting bribes in connection with 
naval contracts. Captain Sawasaki was con- 
demned to one year's imprisonment, but Com- 
mander Suzuki was ac(|uitted. The exist- 
ence of corruption in the Jajianese navy was 
brought to liglit through an action in F.erlin 
in January, tiiis year, and eventually led to 
the fall of the jai)ancse Cabinet. A confi- 
dential clerk, employed in the Tokyo office 
of a German armament firm, was prosecuted 
for selling documents, and during the trial a 
letter was read showing that several high 
Japanese naval nfificers were receiving a per- 
centage on the contracts allotted to the firm. 



To protect roosting poultry from attack 
bv vermin, there has been invented a trap 
whicli, when fastened to a perch, catches 
and poisons insects. 



Demand the tinion label upon all purchases! 



CHARACTER ASSASSINS. 

'I'liere arc different kimls of assassins. 

Not the least deadly of these is he who 
goes about trying to kill character, using 
as his weapon a mass of cleverly clothed 
but vicious lies. 

Character assassination is the latest work 
of the Colorado coal operators. 

Unable to buy or bluff the leaders of 
the strike or the men themselves, they are 
now seeking by insidious lies to attack 
the integrity of certain leaders hoping to 
discredit the organization. 

The most vicious and yet most absurd 
of these personal attacks appears in a bul- 
letin dealing with "Why the Strike A\'as 
Forced on Colorado Miners." 

To give the mass of lies a to'.tch of real- 
ism, the vv'riter of the operators' bulletin 
says that the report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer issued November 30, 1913, shows 
that Frank J. Hayes receives a salary of 
$90 per day, John McLennan $66 per day. 
Mother Jones $42 per day, and John R. 
Lawson $1773.40 for nine weeks' salary. 

Just how the writer's perverted mind 
conceived this myth is impossible to im- 
agine, unless he had been "hitting the 
pipe," which wc understand he does, occa- 
sionally. The operators must have fool- 
ishly pressed him for copy before he could 
come out of his dream. Tn trying to fill 
his contract with them, this was the only 
good lie he could think of on short notice. 

It is well to understand that Hayes, 
Lawson, McLennan and Mother Jones had 
nothing to do with money disbursements 
in this strike. \\\ finances were handled 
by William Green, International Secretary- 
Treasurer, and E. L. Doyle, District Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, who are under bond, and 
who have faithfully and honestly per- 
formed their duties. 

The work of the parties attacked is con- 
fined entirely to the executive end of con- 
ducting the strike and had nothing whatso- 
ever to do with the finances. 

During the more than six months 
Mother Jones spent in the bull pens of 
West Virginia and Colorado, she did not 
receive one cent of salary or expenses from 
the United Mine Workers of America. 

The salary of every officer and organizer 
of the United Mine Workers of America is 
a matter of common knowledge and is 
plainly specified in the constitution of the 
United Mine W^orkers of America. 

For instance, if the International Secre- 
tary-Treasurer paid more salary to any offi- 
cer or organizer than that which is allowed 
by the constitution he would l)e immedi- 
ately subject to removal from ofifice and 
would be ])tinished by law. His report 
nnist show an itemized account of every 
cent paid out by him to any officer or or- 
ganizer, and this report must be approved 
by a Board of .\uditors who semi-annually 
examine his books and accounts. 

The fact of the matter is that at the time 
this report was issued the salary of the 
\'ice-President was $2.^00 per year, and 
the salary of Mother Jones and other or- 
ganizers $4 per day. 

The reports on file in the International 
ofifice and open to inspection will verify 
these figures. 

If the coal operators would lie about 
the.se things, it is not reasonable to believe 
they would deceive you about other inci- 
dents connected with the strike? 



PUBLIC SAFETY HEARINGS. 

The Safety hcpartmcnt "i tli.c Industrial 
.\ccident Commission ol' California has held 
])ul)lic hearings in l.os .\ngcles and San 
Diego. Further hearings will be held in 
ISakersfield on Scjitcmlier 2S. and in Fresno 
on September 30. i*".arly in ( )ctober these 
hearings will be continued iti the cities 
around San Francisco Biiy. as well as in 
Stockton and Sacramento. 

The Workmen's Comi)cnsalion. Insur- 
ance and Safety .Vet recpiires that pulilic 
hearings he licld licfore ])roposed safety 
orders may 1/c made permanent. This is 
the Wi.sconsiii idea, and has worked ad- 
mirably in that State. Its essence is that 
those direct 1\- concerned may participate 
in legislation for tliemselves, and in this 
way due consideration is given a subject 
and there is an avoidance of hasty legis- 
lation. 

Committees of employers and emi)loyees 
will meet to consider 'J'entative (leneral 
Safety Orders and make tlieir recommen- 
dations. 

The ])ublic !iearii\gs on the dates named 
will take the form of "Safety First" con- 
ferences. The law on the subject will be 
outlined, the work and jjlans of the Safety 
De])artment discussed, pictures will be 
thrown on a screen to show the "before" 
and "after" eflfects of industrial safety in 
the factories and workshops of California, 
and short speeches will be delivered by 
lepresentative employers, employees and 
other citizens. Commissioner Will J. 
French will preside, and John R. Brownell, 
Superintendent of Safety, will have charge 
of the pictures and the plans for disctissini; 
the technical ]iart of the orders. 

Tliese public hearings are open to all 
interested. The Industrial Accident Com- 
mission reports that the co-operation ex- 
tended by employers and employes in the 
State of California to the Safety Depart- 
ment has been all that could be desired, and 
indicative of a strong, public sentiment for 
a reduction in the number of deaths and 
injuries in our industries. 



Wireless lighthouses are being estab- 
lished by the French Government along the 
North Coast, the first two being located 
on islands near the approach to the port 
of Brest. Two mcjrc are planned ior the 
port of Havre. The lighthouses will operate 
by a system almost exactly like that of 
ordinary lighthouses, except that, instead 
of waves of light, wireless waves will give 
the information to approaching ships. The 
great advantage of such lighthouses is that 
fog will not hinder their efficiency. When 
a ship approaches I'rest, and is within 30 
miles of the islands, wireless signals will 
be picked u]). If the ship is fitted with a 
"direction finder" it will be easy to apply 
the information, but even without that in- 
strtiment the receipt of any signals at all 
will be of assistance, for the e.xact positions 
of the lighthouses are known. Each sta- 
tion will send out its wireless message 
every few seconds, together with special 
signals to indicate which station is sending. 
The sending apparatus (Marconi system) 
is automatic, and is constructed .so that it 
will run ff>r 30 hours without any atten- 
tion. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Convention Call. 

The A. F. of L. has issued the call for 
its thirty-fourth annual convention, to be 
held in Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia, 
beginning 10 o'clock, Monday morning, 
November 9. 

To be entitled to representation, organ- 
izations must have obtained a charter at 
least one month prior to the convention, 
and no person will be recognized as a dele- 
gate who is not a member in good stand- 
ing of the organization he is elected to 
represent. 

Reference is made as follows to the im- 
portance of this convention : 

"It is, of course, entirely unnecessary here 
to enumerate the important subjects with 
which our forthcoming convention will con- 
cern itself, but the reminder is not at all 
amiss that every effort must l)e made to 
broaden the field and means for the or- 
ganization of the yet unorganized workers, 
to strive to bring about m<jre effectually 
than ever a better day in the li\es and 
homes t)f the toilers, to defend and main- 
tain by every honorable means in our 
power the right to organize for our com- 
mon defense and advancement, for the ex- 
ercise of our normal and constitutional 
activities, to protect and promote the rights 
and interests of the workers; and to assert 
at any risk the freedom of speech and of 
the press and the e(pial rights before the 
law of every worker with every other citi- 
zen ; the tremendous conflict now being 
waged in Europe and its possible conse- 
quences and results, not only upon the 
people of European countries but upon the 
people of America, as well as on the whole 
civilized world, must of necessity receive 
the deepest solicitous consideration of the 
working people of America. These and 
other great questions of equal importance 
will, of necessity, occupy the attention of 
the Philadelphia convention." 



Foresees World's Peace. 

Universal peace will follow the European 
war — a war of aggrandizement and con- 
quest, to divert people from their con- 
structive work of humanizing and democ- 
ratizing tendencies — were the views of 
President Gompers, in a Labor Day speech 
at Plattsburg, N. Y., in referring to the 
present continental upheaval. 

"The end of this war," he said, "will 
mean the vanquishment of autocracy, the 
emergence of a society in which the peo- 
ple shall be supreme, and in which men's 
thought shall be given to the things of 
peace. 

"Civilization had been pressing lu)me 
the sacredness of human life upon the 
consciences of men. Knowledge had con- 
cerned itself with the problems of life that 
men might know themselves and the world 
in which they live in order to gain better 
mastery over the elements and conditions. 
Science had sought to wrest from nature 
understanding of life that men might have 
life more al>undantly. 

"It had studied the nature and causes of 
di.sease in order to conserve and safeguard 
human life. Trained minds were delving 
deep into the secrets of physical forces to 



bring them under the control of the will of 
mankind. They had harnessed the waters 
and the winds to the wheels of civiliza- 
tion. Minds rich in culture and love of 
humanity were studying the ills of society 
that every child might have the right to be 
well-born, to develop its full physical stature 
and to cultivate its mental and moral possi- 
bilities. In all things the purpose of civi- 
lization had been to glorify and enrich the 
lives of the people — all of the people. 

"There were minds that were just upon 
the verge of giving the world the rich 
harvest of years of thought and study. 
There were hearts disciplined by life and 
understanding that were ready to interpret 
the beauty and the truth of life in the 
world's poetry. There were souls that were 
ready to voice the heart of things in 
music. 

"There were fingers whose skill could in- 
terpret life in immortal canvases. There 
were the jeonianry in tlie fields, the fac- 
tories and the \v(jrkshops giving all that 
was of \alue in nuiscle and in mind to the 
l^roducticjn of things necessary for the 
maintenance of life and civilization. 

"These — all these — have been sacrificed 
to the service of the war lords. In a 
mad moment the countries of Europe arc 
savagely condenming to terrible suft'ering 
and hardships and almost certain death 
these lives and talents that have been 
saved, cidtivated and enriched at the ex- 
pense of so much thought and effort. 
I'odies that have been protected by sani- 
tary regulations secured after long, hard 
struggles; nniscles and minds conserved 
by short workdays ; young men that repre- 
sent so much in sacrifices, in aspirations 
and possibilities, are now part of the mar- 
velous machinery of war and devastation. 

"Can this be our boasted civilization? 
Can this be the Europe of- which Tenny- 
son sang: 'Better a hundred years of 
Euro])e than a cycle of Cathay?'" 



Fur Workers Raise Wages. 

Fur Workers' International Union has 
closed a notable agreement with the Fur 
Alanufacturers' Association, composed of 
the largest and most influential employers 
in the business, and a general strike in 
this industry is avoided. A so-called inde- 
pendent association of fur manufacturers 
refused to sign the agreement, and after a 
strike was called against these small con- 
cerns, 202 firms signed up, and eighty-six 
of the independents joined the big associa- 
tion, thereby becoming i)art of the agree- 
ment made with that organization. 

The new rates are : 

C'utters who formerly received $23 a week 
will now receive a minimum of $30. 

( )l)crators and nailers are increased .$."i 
l)er week. 

Finishers arc increased $6 i)cr week. 

Complete union recognition is granted, 
and shop chairmen will be allowed to col- 
lect (lues, which must be paid. 

Xo overtime will be permitted except 
during the first five working days of the 
week during the months of October, No- 
vember, and December, and at no other 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Mull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland BldLjs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internati(in;ile Zeemansvereeniging, Si. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Tn- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange au\- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des AgeiUs (hi Scrxice 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Unicm, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristfania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbuiid, Toldbodgade 15, Kohen- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeeniansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavorntori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeitcrinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madoniiina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicadc dc Fonda Marilima dc 
Cameros y Cocincros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Callc ingia- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
I'cderation Obrera Mnritima (Sailors and b'ire- 
nion), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (.Mios"). 
BRAZIL. 
.'Xssociacao de Marinhciros e Reniandores, Rna 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de .Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Ciiiiarn, 
Rua dos I'enedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 
.^malgamatcd Society of .South Afriian Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



C. B. CANNON 



On any day in the week at the 
T,ondon docks 10,000 unemployed 
can lie foniul. 

I-"i<)in all over Australia conies the 
new-, of the unemployed increasinK 
in nunil)ers. 

Many shop girls in England are 
paid \y.i\. an hour for working, and 
a penny a minute for being late. 

A suggestion for the employment 
of women as police is meeting with 
>trong support in Melbourne. 

Last year 428,000 emigrants got out 
of Italy as fast as they could, and 
spread themselves through Argen- 
tina, America and Brazil. 

"Cotton's Weekly" puts it this 
way: "Early to bed and early to 
rise will make your boss healthy, 
wealthy, and wise." 

There is said to be serious dis- 
tress amongst the lightermen of Rot- 
terdam owing to the shortage of 
trade, and 50,000 families are desti- 
tute. 

The last half-yearly report of the 
.Australian Typographical Associa- 
tion discloses excellent progress, and 
that organization is still forging 
ahead. 

I'or the past year tiie South Aus- 
tralian branch of the Federated 
Clerks' Union shows a SO per cent, 
increase in membership. That's 
progress! 

The Employers' Federation in Mel- 
bourne is agitating for the State 
Government to introduce legislation 
for the prevention of strikes and 
lockouts. 

The members of the Queensland 
Society of Progressive Carpenters 
and Joiners are considering the best 
means to adopt to obtain an increase 
in wages. 

The Fremantle CW. A.) Council of 
the Australian Labor Federation has 
approved of a scheme, drawn up by 
a committee, to make voting by un- 
ionists compulsory. 

The Sydney (N. S. W.) Labor 
Council is insisting that three trawl- 
ers required by the government shall 
be built in Sydney as an encourage- 
ment to Australian industry. 

An American automatic machine 
will shortly be introduced in Aus- 
tralia. This means the displacement 
of a large number of men who earn 
a livelihood as glassblowers. 

Maitland miners, to the number of 
519, who pleaded guilty, in the New- 
castle (N. S. W.) Industrial Court 
recently, to striking, were fined £4 
each. The fines totaled over £2000. 

The British railwaymen are vigor- 
ously opposing increased application 
of the speeding-up system in the 
railway service. This means a great 
endangerment to the safe working 
of the railways. 

The Westralian T,abor Federation 
at Perth has rc(|uested the Federal 
Government to iirovide for the wives 
and families of Imperial reservists 
called out in West .Australia, as the 
men's Imperial pay is only Is. 3d. 
a day. 

Says The Worker of Brisbane, 
Queensland: Complaints are being 
made in New Zealand against the 
Hindu invasion of the backblocks 
lands in the King Country. The 
men's relations with Maori women 
are arousing protests. Exception is 
also taken to the fact that the visi- 
tors from India are undercutting 
the rates of pay received by white 
labor. They do not take hard work 
on a wages basis, but take contracts 
at low rates, and do the work in 
batches of twenty men. 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



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.\nderson. Martin Kolodzie. <ieorg<' 
Amifisuii. .Vxi'l Krjstiansen. Nils 

.Vndorsson, K. -17f>L' Karstln, Hugo 
Anderson, H. -188.3 Leideker, E. 
A.. Mr. -1504 Lang, Chas. 

Andersen. Kdward Lindner, J. -17.'>0 
.\nderson. Oust Lundberg, T. 

Alin, Kmil Lyngard. .lorgen 

Anderson. David C. Mesak, E. 
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PEDRO ' P.erndt. Hugo Martintlli. Wait.i 

Bringsrud. Maralil Mennicke. Kritz 



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Established 1904 at tiie Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Kupfer, born February 9, 
1890, at Coburg, Germany, is in- 
quired for by the German Consulate, 
201 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johannes Puun, born in Oesel, 
.'\rensburg. Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 84 Embarcadero, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

$10.00 reward will be paid by 
Johnson & Higgins, 244 California 
street, for information locating John 
Anderson and George T. Nelson, 
who were members of the crew of 
the steamship "Asuncion" in Octo- 
ber, 1908. 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark "Oasis," Sept. 
2, 1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 

Heinrich Schel, born in Zingst, 
near Barth, Germany, is requested 
to communicate with Mr. A. Praast, 
93 Diepe Straat, Antwerp, Belgium. 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 
—5-13-14. 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y.— 6-24-14. 

Norman Hadley, a seaman, sup- 
posed to be sailing on the Pacific 
Coast, is inquired for by J. B. Mc- 
Curdy & Co., attorneys, relative to 
an inheritance. Anybody knowing 
his whereabouts, please notify Chief 
of Police, San Francisco. 

John Rebbetad, who was in the 
steamer A. F. Lucas in November, 
1911, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Carl Janson, age 36. born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Berg. S. 
Brogard, N. 
Bprg(|vi.st, Wm. 
Boy. A. 
Cirul. M. 
Cliristensen, A. 

-1095 
Cotter, J. 
Carlson. Kalle 
Ct-clan, John 
Clausen, J. 
Chilton. Harrv 
Cadilel. Adolf 
('arlson. Carl 
Dregor, Jack 
Ksscn. Carl 
Kllingson, Ivar 
Fasholz, Dan 
Folvik, I^ewis 
Grigoleit. E. 
Gunther. Dick 
Gustafson, Alf 
Gusek. B. 
Gronlund. Oskar 
IfolmlHug. Frank 
Hansen, Marius 
Holm. Arthur 



Miller, Wni. 
Mayers. P. M. 
Michaelsen, A. -110") 
Morris, M. H. 
Matison, J. -1.12rt 
Makinan, K. 
Nilson, Rdon. C. 
Olsen. A. O. -759 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Ole Wllliclni 
Osterberg, S. H. 

-1284 
Olsen, O. Marthin 
Paader, Hugo 
Paulson, Gustaf 
Perez, .\ntonlo 
Plant, Billle 
Peterson, C. E. -90:' 
Rutel, Ernest 
Robbins. Jaek 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Svensen, Nick 
Svendson, S. -1717 
Steen, J. C. 
Sandy. Oskar 
Samuelsen, Victor 
Schultz, Albert 



Johansen, Eniil 
.Tohansson. N. A. 

-280 
Jensen. Oscar M. 
.Tohnson, John A. 
Jorgenson. H. P. 
.Tohnsen, George 
Karlson. Richiird 



Anderson. Anton 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson. Edvard 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Gusz, Henry 
Hansen, Eugen 
Hansen, Jens 
Jorgensen, C. M. 



Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for iiermanson 
by his sister. Miss Lucy Wood. 108 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
.Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Anybody knowing the where- 
abouts of Arne Johnsen please 
notify O. M. Johnsen, Mosby, 
Christiand S., Norway. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship "Candida" at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

Fritjof EUingsen, age 32, a native 
of Drammen, Norway, he was short, 
heavy set, dark hair, parted in the 
center, and good looking. Anybody 
knowing his whereabouts please noti- 
fy Ed Knach, 171 Clipper street, city. 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 

William Walker, a native of Island- 
magee, .Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
municate with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willowbank St., Brooklands, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688. and C. Mon- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific. San Francisco. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore. 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 



Hansen, H. T. -1446Schultz, Axel 

H.insen, Johannes Sanseter, Paul 

H.-ikonsen, P. O. Schmidt, George 

Haro, Aarp Schager, E. 

Harrold. Henry Svenningsen. S. 

Fritz Schultz. Robert 

lohansen. Ed. -2240 Tell, Olaf 



Tvedt, Olaf 
Thomas. .Toscpli 
Vohs, Heinricli 
Wagner, Billy 
Zimnier, Walter 

Packages. 
Johansen, Nil.s ,\ 



W. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Johanson, John -880 
Koskinen, Suttro 
More, Walter 
Silver, Salln E. 
Ivertsen, Slgvald B. 
Speckman, Mae 
Tomkln, Frank 



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San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

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CIGARS, TOBACCO, SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Bellenot, who last sailed on 
the S. S. "Mariposa" out of Seattle, 
Wash., about November, 1912, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Mrs. Bel- 
lenot, 1406 Second street, West 
Berkeley, Cal. Anyone knowing of 
him kindly write at the above ad- 
dress. — 6-24-14. 

Daniel William Tliorin is inquired 
for by his mother. .Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the 
mother, Fru Thorin, Hegagata 7. 
Goteborg, Sweden. 9-2.'?-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Swedish motor-ship "Kron Prinz Gustaf 
Adolf," said to be the largest in the world of 
its type, arrived at San Pedro September 18 
from Hull, and discharged 3000 tons of coke 
and pig iron for W. R. Grace & Co. 

The Globe Navigation Company, Seattle, which 
owns three vessels, has been placed in the 
hands of a receiver on the application of Ben 
Stanley Revett, who in October of 1912 recov- 
ered a judgment for $8,032.14, with interest. 

The four-master German bark "Kurt" arrived 
at Astoria on September 11 from Santa Rosalia 
and is under charter to M. H. Houser to load 
grain at Portland. She had an uneventful trip 
up the coast and her master knew nothing of 
war having been declared until yesterday, when 
he spoke a whaler ofT the lightship. 

Recommendations that emergency life-saving 
apparatus be provided for those beaches where 
most of San Francisco's drowning accidents oc- 
cur, and that the United States life-saving sta- 
tions be equipped with proper facilities for re- 
suscitation of the partially drowned, were con- 
tained in the report of a coroner's jury at San 
Francisco which investig;ited the death of Edwin 
Johnson. 

Captain Matheson of the codfishing schooner 
"Galilee," arrived from Bering Sea during the 
past week and reported that two fishermen, 
Antone and Ernest Costa, brothers, were lost 
on the fishing grounds and that four other mem- 
bers of the crew deserted. The Costas were 
out in a dory when a squall came on, and they 
were undoubtedly blown oflfshore and capsized, 
as nothing more was seen of them. The "Gali- 
lee" brought 166,000 codfish to the Union Fish 
Company. 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce has 
issued a protest against the President's procla- 
mation providing for a charge of $1.20 per net 
registered ton and in addition a charge of $1.20 
per ton of 100 cubic feet on deck loads. "Inas- 
much as open deck space is not taken into ac- 
count in either gross or net tonnage in measur- 
ing a vessel this is a direct violation of the law 
and an assumption of authority by the President 
directly in conflict with the powers conferred 
by Congress," asserts the chamber's protest. 
"Lumber should not pay any less tolls than any 
other commodity, but it should not be penalized 
and forced to pay more." 

The British Admiralty has not only com- 
mandeered all the Canadian Pacific liners on 
the Pacific ocean, but has also taken the Union 
Steamship Company's new Australian liner 
"Willochra" and the liner "Tahiti" from the San 
Francisco-Australian run. The steamship "Ma- 
rania" has been transferred from the Vancouver- 
Australia run to the San Francisco-.\ustralia 
service, in which the "Maita" and "Moana" are 
also plying. By making shorter stops in port 
the "Niagara" and "Makura" will maintain a 
twenty-eight days' service between Vancouver 
and .Australia, beginning with the sailing of the 
"Makura" from Vancouver on September 30. 
The Japanese Government has taken over some 
passenger boats for transports, but is careful not 
to cripple the service to United States ports, 
the business of which is heavy. 

It has been announced that the Pacific Naviga- 
tion Company will add to the service supplied 
by the fast turbiners "Yale" and "Harvard" by 
the addition of the steamer "Old Colony" to 
the fleet operating between San Frnncisco, Los 
Angeles and San Diego. It is reported that the 
negotiations for the charter of the "Old Colony," 
now operating out of Boston, have been com- 
pleted and that the steamer will be brought to 
the Golden Gate before the first of the new 
year by way of the Panama Canal. The "Old 
Colony," "Harvard" and "Yale" are rated as 
the fastest and most handsomely and adequately 
equipped coastwise passenger liners in the 
United States. The former is a triple-screw 
vessel of 2428 tons register and was turned out 
in 1903 at Chelsea, Afass. She is 184.2 feet long, 
32.5 feet beam and 11.3 feet in denth, with 
double decks, and owned by the Nantasket 
Beach Steamboat Company of Boston. 

At the time of going to press it seemed cer- 
tain that between seventy and eighty lives were 
lost and only two rescued when the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett" of San Francisco 
sank at 3:1.S p. m. on September 18. sixty miles 
south of the Columbia River. The steamer 
"Beaver" has arrived in port with one survivor, 
who told a harrowing tale of how the vessel 
turned turtle and plunged from sight. The 
steamer "hVancis H. Leggett," was owned by 
the Hicks-Hauptman Lumber Company of San 
Francisco and was bound from Grav's Harbor 
to .San Francisco with about 1,400.000 feet of fir 
railroad ties. The "Leggett" was built at New- 
port News in 1903 for the Hammond Lumber 
Company. For a year past she has been oper- 
ated by the Charles R. McCormick Company of 
San Francisco. She is of 1606 tons gross regis- 
ter, 259 feet long, 41.2 feet beam and 19 feet 
deoth of hold. She is a steel three-masted ves- 
sel and is equipped with wireless. Her cargo 
capacity is 1,500,000 feet of lumber. 



Captain I. N. Hibberd, for many years super- 
intendent of the Pacific Coast Steamship Com- 
pany, has resigned to assume the general man- 
agership of the shipping firm of Sudden & 
Christenson. The announcement of the change 
created a stir in shipping circles, where Captain 
Hibberd is a leading light. The coast-to-coast 
service which has been inaugurated by Sudden 
& Christenson will have the attention of Cap- 
tain Hibberd, who is considered an expert on 
the trade problems which have developed as a 
result of the opening of the great waterway. 
Sudden & Christenson have the distinction of 
being the first San Francisco firm, heretofore 
engaged exclusively in the coastwise trade, to 
enter the traffic by way of the big ditch. 
Their service at this time will be handled by 
five steamers of from 5000 to 6000 tons carry- 
ing capacity — the "Peter H. Crowell," "J. A. 
Hooper," "Louis K. Thurlow," "Montroso" and 
"Neches," all practically new vessels. The "J. 
.\. Hooper" left San Francisco on September 15 
for the east coast laden with 800,000 feet of 
lumber and 2900 tons of California barley. The 
"Montroso" has already left the other side and 
will be followed by the "Neches" and the "Thur- 
low." The "Peter H. Crowell" is now loading 
at Gray's Flarbor and will come here to finish, 
steaming for New York and Boston on the 2Sth. 
With the fleet actively in service the company 
will dispatch a vessel from departure points 
every three weeks. 

Beginning the most difficult feat of the kind 
ever undertaken, with the exception of that of 
the famous drydock Dewey, the Redstack tug 
"Hercules" left San Francisco on September 
16, having in tow the largest caisson built in 
the United States, which is to be used on the 
Panama Canal. The great structure attracted 
much attention as it moved down the bay to sea 
at the end of a steel hawser attached to the 
automatic device on the stern of the tug. It is 
estimated that the "Hercules," which is in com- 
mand of Captain Titchworth, will average about 
four and a half knots and that the trip to Bal- 
boa, the Pacific terminal of the big ditch, will 
consume thirty-two days. The tug will burn 
approximately 3000 barrels of oil on the voyage, 
and as the "Hercules'" tanks cannot contain all 
the fuel, some of it is stowed on the caisson 
and will be taken of¥ at sea when needed. At 
this season of the year favorable weather usually 
prevails along the lower coast, and no trouble 
is anticipated with the unwieldy tow. H. H. 
Harris, a marine engineer, representing the 
Union Iron Works, builders of the caisson, is 
on the "Hercules." Captain Hanson and three 
seamen are making their home on the caisson, 
which tows about 500 feet astern of the tugboat. 
It cost the Government $335,000 and was a 
year in building. It is of 2450 tons, 113 feet 
long, 69 feet deep and 35 feet beam, and draws 
about 35 feet of water on the trip. It is to 
be used in pumping the water from the canal 
locks when repairs are necessary. 

The revenue cutter "Bear," which arrived at 
Nome, .Maska, on September 14, with eleven 
survivors of the crew of the Stefansson explor- 
ing ship "Karluk," brought details of the death 
of three members of the party. George Stew- 
art Maloch, geologist, of Hamilton. Ontario, and 
George Bretty, a fireman, died of scurvy on the 
island, and were buried there. Bjarne Mamen, 
assistant topographer and geologist of Chris- 
tiania. Norway, accidentally shot and killed him- 
self with his own gun. He was buried on the 
island. Eight of the expedition are missing, and 
are given up for dead. They are: Alexander 
Anderson, first mate: Charles Barter, second 
mate; John Brody, seaman: H. King, seaman. 
These four men left the wreck of the "Karluk," 
eighty miles from Wrangell Island, and were 
never seen aagin. Alister Forbes Mackay, sur- 
geon, of Edinburgh, Scotland: James Murray, 
oceanographer, of Foxfield, Hants, England; 
Henri Beauchate, anthropologist, of Paris: 
Thomas Morris, seaman, also left the wreck of 
the "Karluk," but never reached Wrangell Is- 
land and must have perished. The eleven were 
rescued from Wrangell Island by the gasoline 
schooner "King and Winge" and transferred to 
the "Bear," The survivors are: William Laird 
McKinley, magnetician, of Clydebank, Scotland; 
John Munroe, chief engineer; Bert Williamson, 
second engineer; Robert Templeman, steward; 
Ernest Chase, assistant steward; Fred W. 
Maurer, fireman: Seaman Iladley; Esr|uimau, 
wife and two children. Counting the eight men 
who perished on the ice while trying to reach 
land after the "Karluk" was crushed, the three 
who died on Wrangell Island and Andrew Nor- 
nian of the Anderson party, who committed sui- 
cide by shooting while insane from exposure 
while lost, twelve members of the Stefansson ex- 
pedition have died. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NORFOLK. Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala.. 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 206 Julia St. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange BIdg., Third Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY. 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 

Chel.sea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Ma.ss.. 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE. Ala., 101 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 227 Sansom St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters (temporary): 

BOSTON, Mass., IVzA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.. 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK. 51 South St. and 280 West St. 
B.'iiLTIMORE. Md., 802-804 S. Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va.. 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 214 West St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, C, 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
."SUPERIOR. Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGFiENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 West Ninth SL 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. III., 406 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, C, 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 I.sabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, 518 Yates St. 

VANCOUVER. B C, 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 
H.i.sting and Main, P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE Wnsh.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

I'MRTLANl). Ore.. 44 Union Ave., Box 2100 

KURKKA. C.il., 227 First St.. P, O. Box 64. 

.S\N PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

IIONOLITLTT, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Pagre 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



TAITr, SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOI/r Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dross all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofilce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of tije Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
.•JO Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Coniniunicatlons from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



w1':dnesday, September 23, lyu. 



MU\IXG TO roSTPOXE ACTION. 



The Senate Cointiiittee on Commerce, on 
September 10, listened to a delegation of 
.shipowners from the I^kes who had jour- 
neyed to Washington to protest against leg- 
islation for greater .safety of life at sea. The 
spokesman of the Lakes shijjowners, after 
])resenting the usual time-worn objections, 
"respectfully recpiested" tliat the Great Lakes 
be omitted from any bill dealing with safety 
at sea. The same gentleman, who objected 
to any kind of safety legislation, was per- 
fectly willing, ht)wever, to entrust his case 
to a commission to consist of : 

One United States naval constructor; one 
naval constructor from tlu- Revcnuc-CuUer Serv- 
ice; two civilian naval architects, one of whom 
has had some experience in deslKning passenger 
steamers for the Great Lakes; one professor in 
naval architecture, to be selected from one of 
our leading universities; and one operating man 
or general manager of one of the larger passen- 
ger steamshi]) lines of the Great Lakes. 

This kind of commission could doubtless 
l)e de])endcd upon lo i)n)tect the interests of 
tlie stockholders. l!ut in order to give the 
shipowners an absolute and .safe majority 
and to make it absolutely certain that there 
will be no interference with dividends, one 
or two other "reliable" persons ought to be 
added to the commission. What is the mat- 
ter with our old friends, General Uhler of 
tlie Steamboat-Inspection Service and Com- 
missioner Chamberlain of the Bureau of Nav- 
igation? If these names are added to the 
list of ex])erts we shall surely have greeter 
safety on the Lakes. Of cour.se, it will not 
be the kind of safety jirovided in tlie Sea- 
men's l)ill. It will not be safety of life, but 
safety of investments, safety of dividends and 
all that goes with it. 

'Iliat delegation of Lakes siiipowners i- 
viiy niode-1. They either want to be left 
entirely alone or they want a commission 
of their own choice to determine what kind 
of safety measures, are good for the traveling 
public. 



The difference between child labor and con- 
vict labor is mainly a matter of age. 



ABOUT AGITATORS. 



There are labor agitators — and others. 
That there are others is not generally con- 
ceded, because the agitators who are hired 
or subsidized by Big Business usually carry 
a different title upon their visiting cards. 

In California, however, the silk-stocking 
agitators have exposed their hands, and as 
a natural sequence there has Ijeen sfMiie news- 
paper comment that is as refreshing as it is 
rare. 

The Stockton open-shop brigade learned, 
some weeks ago, that their campaign for 
labor union extermination was slowly but 
surely degenerating into farce. So their 
emissaries (not agitators) were sent to other 
California cities to try and stir up indus- 
trial strife, in the hope that Stockton would 
thus get rid of some of tlie unpleasant no- 
toriety which is now associated with tlie name 
of that city. 

I'lans were carefully laid to ensnare the 
employers at Marysville in a State-wide 
union-busting campaign. But the Marysville 
employers noted the bait in the trap — they 
had before them the awful object lesson of 
StocktoiL and they politely yet firmly advised 
the trouble-breeders to move on. 

Fresno was then selected as the next point 
of attack. The fomenters of indu.strial war 
arranged for a grand pow-wow of the em- 
ployers, and with suave and honeyed words 
presented their plans to "free" Fresno from 
labor agitators. Again they failed, and their 
failure was made the topic for some very 
])lain editorial comment by the leading daily 
of that city. It should lie borne in mind, too, 
that the h'resno "Rci^ulilican." which took 
this fling at the would-be union-busters, is 
not a labor paper : 

If the purpose of those who inspired tlie em- 
ployers" asst)ciation dinner in I'Vesno last night 
was to repeat in Fresno the experience of Stock- 
ton, that example should be enough to hoodoo 
the whole movement from the start. Fresno is 
in industrial peace and prosperity. Stockton is 
in a state of demoralizing and expensive indus- 
trial turmoil. Certainly there can be no excuse 
for seeking to exchan.ge our condition for Stock- 
ton's. And the assumption that this is the pur- 
pose is not a rash one. Certainly, the leaders 
of a certain sort of industrial organization do 
not come to Fresno from Portland, San l-'ran- 
cisco, Oakland and Stockton merely to cat din- 
ner and to listen to each other make fiery 
speeches. The}' are practical men. and their 
purpose is not to talk, but to act. .\nd the act 
they propose here may be fairly assumed to be 
the same as that which they have done else- 
where. 

Xo such attempt can succeed, and it is to be 
hoped that none will be made. Logically the 
scheme is indefensibly absurd. ."Kiid practically 
it is inexcusably unworkable. The organization 
of labor has come to stay, and nothing can stop 
it. .\nd this means not merely that individual 
workmen shall be free to join labor organiza- 
tions without being individually discriminated 
against in their individual employment by indi- 
\idual employers. It means that when they join 
unions they shall be dealt with collectively, 
throu,gh those unions. Organizations of em- 
ployers, to do this dealing collectively on their 
side also, are legitimate and useful. Organiza- 
tions of employers to nrevent, by collective ac- 
tion on one side, collective dealing with the 
organizations on the other side — and this is the 
only sort now agitated — are not only a denial of 
the most fundamental principle of fair play, but 
are institutions which do nothing but liarm, to 
their members and to the coinmunity. 

Then the people of P.akersfield, California's 

prosperous oil center, heard that the advance 

guard of the Stockton emissaries was coming 

tlicir way. and this is tiie reception they got 

from the Baker.sfield "Daily News." which. 

by the way, is not a labor paper : 

Those walking delegates of the M. ^L & E., 
an organization which has stirred up an indus- 
trial strife in Stockton that the city will not 
recover from for years, are on their way south 
to foment further trouble. .\ few evenings ago 
they launched a campaign in l-'resno, a banf|uet 
being held in that place at which a number of 
hostile mouths were fired off serving as the 



opening guns in the destructive campaign con- 
templated. The walking delegates may be ex- 
pected in Bakerstield at no distant date. 

Notice may as well be served at once, that 
Bakerslield will not stand for anything of the 
nature of the Stockton conliict. The M. ^L & 
F.. is not wanted. This town is not inviting 
and will not welcome the M. M. & E. or pesti- 
lence in any other form. 

If the walking delegates who have struck so 
deadly a blow at Stockton and are now moving 
upon I'Vesno, banquet here for the purpose of 
or.ijanizing a warfare upon the business of Ba- 
kerslield. the "News" will guarantee an open 
mass meeting in the open street with thousands 
present, instead of a select and power-sotted 
lew, to protest against the proposition and to 
provide ways and means of preserving the pres- 
ent peace. 

Nothing like the M. ^L & E. is coming to 
liakersfield to disrupt the present relations be- 
tween employers and workers, and raise a hell 
of trouble, without meeting energetic opposition. 

.\fter this philijipic from liakersfield. it be- 
comes rather difficult to guess in which direc- 
tion the Stockton braves will l)etake them- 
selves. 

Let us hope they will head for Europe and 
join the advance guard of some army. Cali- 
f(irnia can well afford to be rid of such 
rubbish. 



.\n\l-:.\TCRES OI- A "COLLEGE P.YE." 



Some very remarkable and freakish char- 
acters are found among "College Byes." It 
a])i)ears that college education does not nec- 
essarily inject common sense into the stu- 
dent's cranium. In fact, in many instances 
it seems to have a tendency to do the very 
opiKisite by transforming normal young men 
into conceited asses. 

( )ne of these "wonders" in the making 
recently escaped from the university at Eu- 
gene and betook himself to the frozen wilds 
of .Alaska. Cpon his return he told a tale 
so bold and brave that old liaron Munchau- 
sen himself could .scarcely approach in the 
(lays of his ])rinie. Here is the tale of the 
audacious young hero as related by himself 
in the Albany (Oregon) "Argus": 

Telling of hairbreadth escapes, the perils 
faced by men who use toothbrushes in the wilds 
:ind the running of steamboats with drunken 
crews, Clark Hurgard, a son of John Burgard, 
ex-Coinicilman of Portland, visited in .Mbany a 
short time yesterday while on his way back to 
the university at luigene. where he is .i senior. 

hnme<liately after leaving cf)llege early in the 
sinnnier. Clark, acc<inipanied by his younger 
bruihir, Willi.irn Burgard, left for .Alaska where 
their father is interested in several salmon 
steamships that plied along the coast of Alaska. 
The lirst morning in the fo'castle of the ship, 
Clark I'.urgard produced a toothbrush and com- 
menced his morning ablutions. From the entire 
crew there came a roar of derision, and there- 
;ifter JUirgard waited until coming ashore before 
he cleaned his teeth. 

William liurgard, well known in .Mbany, weiu 
as (lickliand on a seconil boat. .At a little point 
.il'dvc Juneau the captain and mates went 
.isliore. enjoyed themselves and became hilari- 
ously drunk. Five hours after the schedule 
sailing of the boat, young Burgard went ashore 
and dragged the exuberant officers aboard. 

Though a green hand, the young m.in had 
learned to box the compass, and that night, 
with a drunken crew, he left the port above 
Juneau and by 7 o'clock the next morning 
bad successfully steered the boat through the 
darkness into Juneau. OfHicers of the company 
came down, heard the tale and made him cap- 
tain of the boat Utr the remainder of the summer. 

There you have it — "the truth and noth- 
ing but the truth," certified to by the world- 
beater from Eugene, Oregon. While wise 
men are talking about the necessity of three 
years' training for an able-seaman, this prod- 
uct of an Oregon university demonstrated to 
the world that a competent and qualified skip- 
l)er can be evolved over night. 

h'arewell. Seamen's bill. What need is 
there for training .American boys at .sea when 
this ( Iregon wonder has made it i)erfectlv 
clear that the college is the place to make 
the best master mariner? 

It is pleasing to note tliat the gallant lad 



n^ll^SrgEL 



9E 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



who saved the ship from its drunken crew 
was so fittingly rewarded. But we feel that 
something should be done also for the brother 
with the toothbrush. That yarn surely en- 
titles him to some recognition. What is the 
matter with the Carnegie Hero Commission?' 



AUSTRALIA AND THE JAPS. 



Elsewhere in this issue the Journal re- 
prints editorial comment upon the European 
war from the Australian labor press. When 
our fellow scribes in Australia wrote their 
first impressions upon that unfortunate war 
of nations Japan had not entered the arena. 
Now that the Mikado has stepped into the 
breach and agreed to drive the Kaiser's .ships 
and soldiers from the Orient, it will be in- 
teresting to know how this sinister alliance 
will be regarded by the workers of Australia. 

We have already been told what prize 
jajian expects to gain. It is not only the 
territory leased by the Kaiser from China, 
I)ut is something that the "white" I'ritish 
colonies can least afford to give. 

Still, a writer in "The Japan Magazine" 
(Tokyo) is quite certain that Japanese and 
Australians are capable of arriving at some 
understanding that will give the British col- 
onists in Japan equal privileges with Japa- 
nese in tlie English colonies. Thus we read 
from a translation made for the "IJterary 
Digest" : 

There is nothing); tliat would do so much to 
l)in(l East arid West firmly together as the 
opening of the British colonies to Japanese im- 
migration. Then, indeed, Britain would be a 
lion endowed with wings. Large numbers of 
Japanese in the British colonies would mean 
that Britain would have the assistance of Japan 
in the protection of her colonies. But if an 
anti-Japanese agitation is permitted, both coun- 
tries will be making the worst instead of the 
best of the Anglo-Japanese Alliance. Thus it 
would be allowed to make Japan an enemy in- 
stead of a friend. The policy suggested would 
also tend to make the colonies permanent parts 
of the British Empire, whereas now they may 
some time be tempted to independence. If such 
a situation can arise in a small place like Ulster, 
it is just as likely to arise in any of Britain's 
outlying possessions. It seems to the Mainichi 
that the IBritish people both at home and in the 
colonies are not yet alive to the importance of 
the policy suggested, and it is, therefore, pointed 
out and emphasized before it is too late. 

If we know anything of the temper and 
determination of the workers in Australia 
and New Zealand, they will never sacrifice 
their "white Australia" policy to ]:>lease any 
ally of their motherland. 

When the war is over one of the countries 
involved in tiiis affair is going to be badly 
fooled, and unless we are greatly mistaken it 
will not be Australia, New Zealand or British 
Columl)ia. 



MINERS ACCEPT CONCILIATION. 



The last issue of "Die Schift'ahrt," organ 
of the (jerman Seamen's Union, dated August 
l.T, \')\4. announces that after seventeen 
years of continuf)us existence it is now com- 
pelled to suspend publication. The editor in 
his valedictory makes it clear that suspension 
of publication is made necessary because 
(jerman shij)ping is at a standstill and jirac- 
tically all members of the imion have been 
called to the colors "to defend the father- 
land." iiie I'rench and Austrian seamen's 
l)ai)ers have also evidently been susi)ende(l. as 
no copies liave arrived here since the war of 
nations got in full swing. The official organ 
of the Sailf>rs' and b'iremen's L'nion of (ireat 
IJritain and Ireland is still published and re- 
ceived with old-time regularity. 



On September 15, one year after the 
miners decided to strike for an enforcement 
of Colorado mining laws, 125 officers and 
members of the United Mine Workers of 
America met at Trinidad, Colorado, to decide 
whether or not they would consider a j^lan 
of conciliation suggested l)y President Wood- 
row Wilson. 

Following is the text of the proposed 
agreement : 

Whereas, the industrial conflict in the coal 
mining fields of Colorado has disrupted the 
peace of those sections of the State to the ex- 
tent that a state of war has practically existed 
for some time; and 

Whereas, a temporary peace is maintained by 
the presence of the Federal troops; 

Therefore, there should be- established a three- 
year truce, subject to: 

1. The enforcement of mining and labor laws 
of the State. 

2. That all striking miners who have not been 
found guilty of violation of the law shall be 
given employment by the employer they for- 
merly worked for, and where the place of the 
employe has been filled, he shall be given em- 
ployment as a miner at the same or other mines 
of the company. 

3. Intimidation of union or non-union men 
strictly prohibited. 

4. Current scale of wages, rules and regula- 
tions for each mine to be printed and posted. 

5. Each mine to have a grievance committee 
to be selected by majority ballot at a meeting 
called for the purpose, in which all employes 
(except officials of the company) have the right 
to participate. 

Members of said committee must be employed 
at least six months at the individual mine be- 
fore being eligible. 

Married men to be in the majority on each 
committee. 

Grievances to be first taken up individually 
with the proper officer of the company. Failing 
adjustment, they can refer to their local .griev- 
ance committee for further consideration with 
the mine officials. Still failing agreement, the 
matter shall be submitted to a committee com- 
posed of three men to be appointed by the Pres- 
ident of the United States and which shall be 
representative of each side, with the third mem- 
ber to act as umpire, whenever necessary. This 
commission shall, during the three years of 
truce, serve as adjusters or referees in all dis- 
putes (whether individual or collective) afifecting 
wages, working and social conditions. 

Said commission shall devote primarily all the 
necessary time to the consideration and adjust- 
ment of such disputes. 

6. It is understood as a condition of the 
creation of said commission that during the life 
of the truce — 

(A) The claim for contractual relations is to 
be waived, but this shall not prevent the vol- 
untary agreement between any employer and 
their employes during the life of this truce. 

(B) No mine guards to be. employed, InU 
this does not preclude the employment of nec- 
essary watchmen. 

(C) In the establishment of the truce tin- 
presence of the Federal or State troops should 
become unnecessary. 

(D) There shall be no picketing, parading, 
colonizing or mass campaigning by representa- 
tives of any labor organization of miners that 
are parties to this truce, which will interfere 
with the working operations of any mine dur- 
ing the said period of three years. 

(E) During said truce the decisions of the 
commission in cases submitted shall be final and 
binding on employers and employes. 

(I"") There shall be no suspension of work 
l)cnding the investigation and reaching a deci- 
sion on any dispute. 

(G) The suspension of a mine over six con- 
secutive days by the company m;iy be aiUhor- 
ized for cause satisfactory to the commission, 
but not -'ending any dispute. 

(H) Wilful violations on any of these con- 
ditions will be subject to such penalties as may 
be imposed by the commission. 

On account of the mutual benefits derived 
from the truce, the employers and emjiloycs 
should each pay one-half of the expenses of 
the commission. 

According to newspaper dis])alclu's, (he 
miners voted to accept the i'resident's |)ian 
of conciliation. It yet remains to be seen 
whether or not John 1). Rockefeller, jr., and 
his allied interests in Colorado will do likewise. 



Overtime and jnece-vvork are the twin de- 
vices by which individual greed is used to 
degrade the mass. 



The. employer of child labor who reads 
his Bible probably regards with regret the 
assurance of the Savior that the Kingdom 
of Heaven is composed mainly of children, 
.since he can not hope to start a factory or 
in any other wav "invest capital" there. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

I k-adiiuarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 21, 1914. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m E. Ellison presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. Shipwreck Benefit was awarded 
to three members of the crew of the schooner 
"W. H. Dimond." Thomas E. Zant, a repre- 
sentative of the San Francisco Labor Council, 
addressed the meeting upon the Stockton lock- 
out and the progress of the boycott against the 
Sperry Flour Company. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



"Victoria, B. C, Sept. 14, 1914. 
Xo meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
.SIS Yates St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 14, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 14, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sent. 14, 1914. 
.Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen ,A.gency, Sept. 14, 1914. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 

Portland .Agency, Sept. 14, 1914. 
Shiiiping and- prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON. Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 44 Union Ave. North. Tel. 
East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 14, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 
JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 14, 1914. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Ifontdulu .\gency, Sept. 9, 1914. 
No meeting. .Shipping and prospects poor. 
JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

I lca(l(|tiartcrs, .S;in l-'rancisco, Cal., Se])t. 17, 1914. 
The regular weekly meeting was called to 
order at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping fair for waiters, 
slack for cooks. The full Shipwreck Benefit was 
ordered paid to one member wrecked on the 
steam- schooner "Scotia." 

EUGENE .STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 M.nket St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 10, 1914. 
.Shippin.L; slack; plenty of men ashore. 

LEONARD NORKGAUICR, .\gcn(. 
Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. Box No. 214. 
'hone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 9, 1914. 
No meeting; shipping very poor. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box .54. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



AUSTRALIA ON THE WAR. 



The labor press of Australia and New 
Zealand has been heard from regarding the 
European war. There is a marked absence 
of enthusiasm and there are no patriotic 
effusions. 

To quote from the .\ustralian "Worker": 
War Has Been Declared. 

It is iiorrible to tliink of. 

That two civilized peoples like the British and 
the Germans should confront eacli other with 
murder in their hearts and lethal weapons in 
their hands is something to make us despair of 
progress. 

It is 2000 years since Christ gave up his life, 
and said of those who slew him, "They know 
not what they do." Since then the world has 
heen enriched with a wonderful efflorescence of 
genius. Many great men and noble women have 
blest it with inestimable gifts of science and art, 
of literature, and of spiritual teaching. Is this 
the best use we can make of the splendid fruit- 
age of their lives? 

Why shoukl the nation of Shakespeare, Milton, 
and Newton, and the nation of Goethe, Beetho- 
ven, and Humboldt, — why should these two 
mighty nations wish to hglit like wild beasts, 
and destroy each other as though Hritons and 
(icrmans were more valuable dead than living? 

This is not a war for which a single extenu- 
ating reason can be given on either side. There 
is no great principle at the back of it, no vital 
issue on which two high-spirited and iiUelligent 
people might earnestly differ, and deem it not 
unworthy to shed their blood. 

Yet there it is, and we have got to deal, not 
with theoretical conditions, but with things as 
they are. 

The trial will be a severe one. It is false to 
say that war strengthens and uplifts a nation. 
That is one of those monstrous fallacies in- 
\eiUed to excuse men in the evil that they do. 

.'\ustralia will suffer much in the struggle that 
seems ahead, when two such nations bring all 
the vast resources of their civilization to bear 
upon each other in doing the devil's work. 

Thousands of unemployed will be created; un- 
scrupulous greed will seize the opportunity to 
raise the necessaries of life to famine prices. 

May the suffering not engender still deeper 
furies. May .Australia succeed in subduing the 
frightful passions which war stirs up in the 
human heart. 

The Maorilaiid "Worker" is eciually frank 

in statint^ its view.s, as folUjws: 

The Jingo Spirit. 

W'e frankly confess to feelings of grave dis- 
appointment at the peculiar capers of Labor men 
and Labor bodies in connection with the present 
international orgy. We admit at once that the 
position is serif)us, that the effects of the con- 
llict are far-reaching, but we do not believe that 
because this is so it justities the frantic jingoism 
displayed in some quarters. 

To our mind, men like Keir Hardie and Ram- 
say McDonald are adopting an attitude that 
should commend itself to all sane-thinking work- 
ers throughout the world. These men say dis- 
tinctly that there is no reason or Justitication 
for the mad militarism now indulged in. In a 
nation of military maniacs they are eminently 
sane. Closely in touch with international affairs, 
probably two of the best-informed men in Brit- 
ain on a question such as this is, they can see 
Interests recreantly skulking in the shadows, re- 
sponsible for the whole damnable business, and 
refuse to remain dumb tools or to quietly ac- 
fiuiesce in the hideous conspiracy. 

Both men have bravely dared, in the very 
heart of the whole disturbance, to raise their 
voices against the murder being done. We can 
raise our hats to them; for men of their caliber, 
at a time like this, are all too scarce. Would 
that some of our good comrades here would 
emulate them. 

The Brisbane ( Queen-sland | "Worker" does 

not mince words in stating its views which 

read, in part, as follow^s : 

War and the People. 

The friend of to-day is the enemy of to- 
morrow. .At Waterloo just a hundred years ago 
Britons and Germans fought side by side against 
Napoleon in his last effort to retrieve his wan- 
ing fortunes. And through the succeeding cen- 
tury, there existed a bitter national animosity 
between not only the Governments of Great 
liritain and France, but the people themselves, 
extending to the very children. 

Ct)ntemporaneously there persisted a more or 
less friendly feeling between the British and 
the Germans. Of late years, owing to the work- 
ings of various influences, particularly that of 
Capitalism, the position has gradually reversed 
itself, until to-day the world is trembling at the 
spectacle being unfolded before its horrified 
eves of what mav be another great slaughter on 
the same field of Waterloo. 

And what interest have the i)eople in this, 
the most astounding crime the world has ever 
seen? What benefit have they indeed ever had 
from any of the devastating wars that so-called 



statesmen and rulers have foisted on to them 
and made them fight and pay for? 

Men arc yet much too near the savage stage 
to be able to withstand the strong current that 
carries them right into the war vortex when 
their passions are stirred by excited appeals to 
defend themselves. It is this proximity to primi- 
tive savagedom that makes them an easy prey 
and pliant tools at times like these. 

The whole position is full of perplexing para- 
doxes that vex the spirit of everyone who de- 
sires to see the world a great Commonwealth 
crowned with universal peace. Should a man 
who has done what lay in his power to promote 
fraternity and abolish the settlement of disputes 
by war, refuse at a time like this to assist his 
country, he is faced with a problem as to 
whether he may not be assisting an enertiy who 
will be more a foe to progress than his own 
people. 

There was a man who said that patriotism 
is a crime. Such a statement is not likely to 
be particularly popular just now, but it is a 
philosophic truth with sufficient justification to 
warrant combined action on the part of the 
allegedly civilized nations to weld sectional pa- 
triotism into a world-wide Federation. 

Five hundred millions of pounds is a con- 
servative estimate of the amount that is wasted 
every year by the leading Nations in providing 
warlike material. To what good uses such a 
sum spent every year could be put by a world 
executive operating in the interests of peace 
and liumanityl 

Here is another paradox. These Powers that 
expend huge revenues year after year in ad- 
vancing their civilizations in all the Arts that 
peace fosters so well — education, scientific re- 
search, architecture, improved methods of man- 
ufacture — at the same time expend almost as 
large sums to destroy those advantages! . . . 

Truly the extremes of mankind meet in the 
modern man. When the war fever attacks him 
he is in most cases just as savage as his pro- 
genitors of a thousand, five thousand, or twenty- 
five thousand years ago Without the provoca- 
tion of international jealousies he would be but 
a little lower than the angels. 

it may fervently be hoped that the present 
war is but an evil out of which good may 
come; and that it will speed the time when 
those who have most to lose by war and most 
to gain bv peace will cast aside all smaller 
issues at the first opportunity and demand such 
representation in parliament as will have for 
its chief and lasting objective the happiness of 
all mankind by declaring for no war at any price. 



TAFT CONGRATULATES GOMPERS. 



"1 congratulate you on the hard fight 
that you have made, and up to this time 
the successful fight you have luade against 
the spread of socialism among the wage- 
earners, lender present conditions of hu- 
man nature the socialistic state is an im- 
po.ssible one without a tyranny, in con- 
trast with which every hardship or injus- 
tice of the present industrial system will 
seem trivial." 

The al)o\'e is a (jiiotation from the con- 
trii)ution to the September issue of the 
.American Federationist by ATr. Wm. H. 
Taft. Tt is well to remember that Mr. 
Taft is a large, round man, in fact, he is 
the largest and fattest e.\-President in 
captivity. 

So it should be easy to see just why Mr. 
Taft is interested in the welfare of the 
.American Federation of Labor and why he 
is the best judge of its needs. Surely Mr. 
Gompers will appreciate the sfuirce of his 
praise. 

Mr. Taft perhaps has in mind the fact 
that the two million workers in the A. F. 
of Iv. will be perfectly docile and properly 
divided just so long as the "Ciomperes" are 
allowed to iriake a "successful fight against 
the spread of socialism among the wage- 
earners," while the friends and equals of 
Taft hire murderers and militias to butcher 
workingmen in AVest A'irginia. Michigan, 
Colorado and elsewhere. Yes Rill, "Cod 
only knows what will become of you and 
your class" when the .Airierican labor 
movement gets rid of Sammy. By their 
friends shall ye know them. When the 
president of the American Federation of 
Labor deserves the thanks of Injunction 



Bill it is time for the rank and file of the 
.American labor movement to wipe their 
glasses. Ch.\s. M. Albrecht. 



BLOOD AND IRON. 



Who is responsible? Now, when the 
red deluge has so suddenly and unex- 
pectedly surpri.sed the whole of Europe, we 
hear on every hand the same (juestion : 
Who is responsible? 

Evidently, each country has its own par- 
ticular answer to the query. The rulers 
of every land throw the blame on their 
rivals, and the Press, whose special con- 
cern it is to luanufacture "public opinion," 
makes the necessary observations and com- 
ments. The Kaiser declares that it was 
the enemies of Germany who compelled 
iiim to wage war, and that he was the 
sole person in Europe who continually 
strove to maintain peace among the Euro- 
pean nations. In l':ngland and France, on 
the other hand, the Kaiser is the "mad 
dog" of Europe, the only one who continu- 
ally hindered and disturbed the peaceful 
relations of its peoples. And the Tsar, 
the red-handed executioner of Russian free- 
dom, who converted Russia into a huge 
cemetery, and endeavored to stifle the last 
hope of his oppressed .subjects in a sea of 
!)Ioo(l — he talks of a holy war, a just war, 
in order to ensure the happiness and well- 
being of Europe! 

.\nd in all lands the sounding church- 
bells are calling the pious Christians to 
come and unite their prayers that the 
Lord should destroy the enemy, and bless 
"their banners." The same God ! the same 
Christians! the same Gospel, whose founder 
said, "Love thy neighbor as thyself!" 

What scandalous comedy! .And how 
dec]) the ignorance and decei)tion of the 
|)eople who neither will nor can sec this 
colossal fraud, and the luiscruptdous in- 
trigues of their oppressors. 

Who is responsible? you ask. Do not 
look for the responsibility in others. Look 
for it in yourselves. Seek it in the cursed 
system whose victims we all are: in the 
State capitalistic civilization which is based 
on organized violence, cm the shaiueful 
exi)loitation of all the nations! 

You do not know, it seems, that we 
have been living in a state of war for 
many, many years past ; you have ignored 
the war that is being waged daily in our 
beautiful society, therefore you now have 
a real war. A^ou were silent when men, 
women and children fell in great numbers 
ui)()n the industrial field, therefore you now 
see your sons falling on the battlefield. 
For the same powers that deprived you of 
the fruits of your labor, and compelled you 
by hunger and starvation to create riches 
for a minority of privileged thieves and 
idlers — the same powers will now take 
away the lives of your sons and brothers, 
and force. you with their guns to die for 
their interests. — Freedom, London, Eng- 
land. 

Tests of various kinds of concretes and 
cement mortars now under way in Ger- 
many will e.\tend over a period of thirty 
vears. 



In a South Dakota town water that 
flows from an artesian well at a tempera- 
ttn-e of 100 is used for heating purposes. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



L3E...^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BIRD REFUGES. 



In order to prevent the threatened exter- 
mination of numbers of sea-birds, active 
protection societies have been formed in 
many of the ports and watering places on 
the North Sea and the Baltic. Each soci- 
ety controls its own district, but acts in 
conjunction with the others, the object 
being to form a ring round the coast and 
provide the birds with sanctuaries. The 
North Sea especially ofifers facilities on the 
new sand-banks which rise between the 
chain of islands and the coast. Memmert, 
a dune island between Borkum and Juist, 
which a few decades ago was only a low 
sand-bank, is now so raised that even high 
tides do not invade it. 

When, in 1907, it was rented by one of 
these societies, there were about 80 couples 
of the beautiful silver seagull on the is- 
land, and in five years their numljer had 
risen to 2000 couples. This has been the 
result of placing an attendant on the island 
to refuse admission to strangers during 
the nesting season. Similar spots have 
been found for the birds on the outlying 
points of Langeoog, Norderney, and in the 
estuaries of the Jade and the Elbe. The 
famous eider ducks have taken a fancy to 
the peninsula of Ellenbogen on the Sylt, 
which has also been purchased, and are 
so tame that it is easy to approach them, 
and even sometimes to touch them. 

On the Baltic only Mecklenburg and 
Pomerania have so far provided sanctu- 
aries, but the Werderinsel, near the penin- 
sula of Zingst, is a perfect paradise for 
birds. It is inhabited by nearly every va- 
riety of sea-bird — avosetta, wild duck, sea 
swallows, and thousands of laughing sea- 
gulls. The Baltic islands are well wooded 
and are admirably suited for bird life, but 
on tlie North Sea the islands are very bar- 
ren and afford little cover for them. 



MILLIONAIRES' MITES IN 1913. 



Twenty-eight persons last year gave 
$1,000,000 or more for benevolent purposes, 
notes The Watchman-Examiner (New 
York), and "if a full list of these were 
printed few would be able to tell on what 
objects the majority of these gifts were 
bestowed, so common have great gifts to 
benevolent purposes become." The aggre- 
gate amount of recorded benefactions in 
1913, according to the figures quoted in 
the Baptist weekly, was $302,000,000. "Of 
this $170,000,000 was for education, and 
$95,000,000 for religious and charitable 
purposes, including missions.'' Certain 
other interesting facts are thus set forth : 

"The largest beneficiary was the Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art in New York 
City, which received $23,000,000, including 
an art collection valued at $15,000,000 from 
the Benjamin Altman estate, a collection 
of arms valued at $5,000,000 from W. M. 
Kiggs, and the whole estate of J. I>. Ham- 
mond, the typewriter manufacturer, esti- 
mated at $3,000,000. This does not in- 
clude what the Musemn may receive from 
the $50,000,000 collection of J. Pierpont 
Morgan, part of which is now on Icjan ex- 
hibition in the Museum. Probably the 
next largest beneficiary of the year is the 
foundation for charitable purposes estab- 
lished by Mr. John 1). Rockefeller, char- 
tered in the State of New York. The 
amount is not named, and ultimately may 



exceed the gifts to the Museum. The 
$10,000,000 given by Andrew Carnegie for 
a charitable foundation in his native town, 
Dunfermline, Scotland, comes next. The 
gifts of Oliver H. Payne, of $4,250,000 to 
Cornell University, and Robert P. Dore- 
mus, estimated at under $5,000,000, to 
Washington and Lee LTniversity of Vir- 
ginia, are in the same class. But the most 
unique and heart-stirring gift of the whole 
year was that of Reed B. Freeman, of 
Binghamton, New York, who gave his 
whole fortune, estimated at $3,000,000, to 
the families of the thirty girls who perished 
in the burning of his factory, and at sixty- 
five years of age began business again as a 
clerk in New York City, a poor man." 



SAILORS' SNUG HARBOR. 



A unique case has just been decided by 
the courts of New York, inasmuch as the 
basis of the case was to get permission to 
spend part of an income which has been 
accumulating so rapidly as to become a 
.source of embarrassment to its possessors. 
Under the decision of the court the trustees 
of the famous Sailors' Snug Harbor will 
now have authority to employ the personal 
property in their possession in making 
needed general improvements. Sailors' 
Snug Harbor was founded by the will of 
Robert Richard Randall, who died on June 
5, 1901. In his will he directed that all his 
real estate, consisting of the Minto Farm 
of about sixteen acres in the Fifteenth 
Ward and four lots in the First Ward, with 
$723 in 3 per cent, and $6430 in 6 per cent, 
stocks, should be devoted to the founda- 
tion of an asylum and hospital for aged 
mariners. So modest did he consider this 
bequest that he directed his trustees to per- 
mit tlie fund to accumulate until it could 
provide for the maintenance of 50 inmates 
before the institution was started. The 
Minto Farm was cut up into blocks be- 
tween Fourth and Fifth avenues. This 
farm was bought by Mr. Randall in 1790 
for $12,500, and is now estimated to be 
worth nearly $20,000,000, it being almost in 
tlie center of New York's retail dry goods 
district. l'>ut there has been a difficulty 
about its management. Charitable trustees 
have been prohibited from entering upon 
the same vigorous management as private 
owners, and the district has stagnated in 
consequence of these limitations. The de- 
cision of the court has now modified the 
rules under which the trustees can act so 
that they may apply the personal property 
in their possession to the general improve- 
ment of the real estate. Sailors' Snug Har- 
bor is located on Staten Island, and diu^ing 
its existence it has sheltered thousands of 
old sailors. It has been said that it is one 
of tlie most wealthy institutions in the 
world, due largely to the increase in the 
\alue of real estate on Manhattan Island. 
During recent years there has been a grad- 
ual falling off of inmates in the Harbor, 
owing to the passing of the old-time sailor. 



When a hydroaeroplane fell into vSwe- 
disli waters recently a submarine boat dived 
under it and l)r(night it to shore unin- 
jured. 



In an aviation school in Berlin the ma- 
chines are susi)ended from a circular track 
until the students learn enough to be 
trusted to o])eratc them free from control. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, HI. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO. N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAT CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT. 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND. 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

S'IPERIOR. WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG. N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

55 Main St,, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 2295. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO. ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. 54 Main street 

DETROIT. MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT. 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES, 
MARINE HOSPITALS: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS: 
Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

.Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Hiiffnlo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich, 

Dnlutli, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

h'scanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

f^Jr-.uiil Haven, Mich. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Oroeti Bay, Mich. Kaginiiw, Mich, 

'loughton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

I.uilington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

M.-inlstee, Mich. .Shehovgan, Wis. 

I'^rle, Pa. Punerlrtr, Wis, 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



time. < )vcrtinie work shall be iiaid for at 
the rate of time and one-half. 

No work shall be sent to the homes of 
workers, and no contracting or sub-con- 
tractint; shall be permitted inside of the 
factory. 

\o ])iece-work shall be permitted, and 
all fire and labor laws shall be considered 
part of the a.8;rcement. 

The employers further at^ree that if the 
union will obtain •"from any sjroup of em- 
ployers conditions and standards of em- 
ployment more favorable than those herein 
stipulated." that the niaintaiuintr of such 
hit^her standards and conditions shall be- 
come obli.L^atory upon the tirms signint^ the 
contract. 

About ').000 workers are affected by this 
agreement. A. l'\ of L. Organizer I-'rayne 
assisted in the negotiations. 



Alien Births in 1910 Census. 

There were l.i,.^15.SS6 persons of foreign 
birth in the L'nited States in .\pril, 1910, 
according to an interesting report on popu- 
lation issued by Director William J. Har- 
ris, of the lUireau of the Census. ]3epart- 
nient of Commerce. These 13,515,886 for- 
eigners constituted 14.7 per cent, of the 
total population of the United States in 
r)10; 13,345,545 of them were whites, the 
remainder, which was only 170,641, repre- 
senting chiefly Japanese and Chinese. The 
foreign born in the United States in 1900 
numbered 10,341,276 and constituted 13.6 
l)er cent of the total population. 

The country of birth of the 13.345.545 
white foreigners in l'>10 was as follows: 
England. 876.455; Scotland, 261,034; Wales, 
82,479: Ireland. 1.3.52.155; Germany, 2,501,- 
181; Norway. 403,8.58; Sweden. 685.189; 
Denmark. 181,621; Netherlands, 120.053: 
I'.elgiuni. 449..W7: Lu.xemburg. 3.068: 
I'rance, 117.236; Switzerland. 124,834; 
Portugal. SJSili: Si)ain, 21.977; Italy. 1,- 
.U3.070; Russia. 1.602.7.52; Kinlandr 129,- 
669; .\ustria. 1,174,924; Hungary, 495,600; 
Roumania. 65,920; Bulgaria, Servia, and 
Montenegro, 21,.541 ; Greece. 101,264; Tur- 
key in Kurope. 32,221 ; Turkey in .Asia, 59,- 
702; Canada (French), 385.083; Canada 
(other than .Newfoundland), 816,0<')3 ; Mex- 
ico. 219,802; Cuba and other West Indies 
(except I'orto Rico), 23,169; all other coun- 
tries, 56,701. 



A Truth Embedded in Law. 

Id Senator Cummins, of Iowa, belongs 

the honor of originating this sentence 

which, by the action of the Senate, now 

introduces section 7 of the new .\nti-Trust 

bill: 

THE LABOR OF A HUMAN BEING IS 
NOT A COMMODITY OR AN ARTICLE OF 
COMMERCE. 

The i)urpose of Congress is to ])rotect 
labor unions and farmers' organizations 
from summary condemnation luider the 
anti-trust laws. In their case, as in that 
of cor])orations. there must be ])roof of 
crime before there can be conviction, and 
no injunction shall be issued forbidding 
individual members from lawfully carrying 
out the legitimate objects of their organ- 
izations. 

When secti<in 7. often referred to as '"la- 
bor's bill of rights." passed the House it 
\ as highly objectionable, for the reason 



that it made no distinction between unions 
acting lawfully and unions acting unlawful- 
ly. The Senate amendments have safe- 
guarded that point perfectly, but of even 
greater importance they have introduced 
into Federal law an idea that fittingly 
supplements the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion and the thirteenth amendment. 

Labor was a commodity and an article 
of commerce when it was bought and sold 
under cover of the common law. as in the 
case of indentured servants; when it was 
traflficked in by wholesale between nations. 
States and individuals, as in African 
slavery : when shiploads of coolies were 
brought to this country in practical bond- 
age : when ])eonage was established in 
\arions parts of the Inited States; when 
the children of the Republic were ex- 
j)loited in the mills, and when great em- 
plovers iriiported thousands of working 
men to take the place of higher-priced 
labor. 

These infamies have all been stopi)ed by 
law. but it remained for the present Demo- 
cratic Senate, under the leadership of a Re- 
publican, to put into a few simple words 
the rule wdiich has guided us. It is more 
than a rule, more than a sentiment, and 
even more than a principle. It is an in- 
vincible -truth as deadly to the mummers 
of so-called political economy in the books 
as to inhumanity and greed in action. — 
.New A'ork World. 



Colorado's Military Debt. 

Inder the caption "Colorado's Military 
Debt," the L'nited Mine Workers in their 
last bulletin, issued to counteract the mine 
owners' jjublicity campaign, discusses the 
financial toll citizens of this State will be 
called ui)on to meet. The workers say: 

".\t the request of the coal operators, the 
Colorado militia spent six months in the 
coal strike zone. Although there was no 
trouble in the district, except a few skir- 
mishes, where strikers were forced to de- 
fend themselves against mine guards, State 
officials claimed it was necessary to saddle 
a million-didlar debt on the taxpayers of 
the whole State that the property of the 
operators might be 'protected.' 

"Colorado appropriated $1,000,000 of the 
taxpayers' money to 'protect' property on 
which the State receives a total yearly tax 
of $12,378.67. 

"Practically all of this million-dollar 
militar)' debt was contracted to 'protect' 
])roperty in Las Animas and HuerfaiKi 
counties, on which Colorado receives $3,- 
.560.22 a year in State taxes. 

"Industrial historj' does not reveal a 
mine where it has been possible to get out 
coal without at least a tipple. Yet the 
coal ( perators lease 5,220 acres of your 
land in Las .Animas county valued at $1,- 
207,4(X), on which there are no improve- 
ments, according to their tax schedules. 

"It must be remembered that, in addi- 
tion to incurring a million-dollar debt, 
Colorado protected i)roperty rights at the 
expense of personal and constitutional 
rights." 



Uncle Sam to Loan Money. 

Inited States Senator Jones of Wash- 
ington has introduced a bill in the Senate 
to amend the Federal Reserve Board act 
to organize and ])ut in operation a loaning 
system through which loans not exceeding 
$5,000 may be made to any one person 



at not to exceed 4 per cent, interest, and 
for a period of time not to exceed twenty 
years. These loans shall be made only for 
the purpose of acquiring farm lands or 
city property, and improving the same for 
residence purposes, or for improving resi- 
dence property. 

The bill provides that the loans shall be 
made "to such honest, industrious, tem- 
l)erate, economical persons, as in the judg- 
ment of said board, with the property so 
purchased or improved as security, will 
reasonably insure the repayment of such 
loan with interest within the time fixed." 

In introducing the bill, Senator Jones 
made this comment : 

"Mr. President, the strong and the pow-- 
erfid are able to present their claims to 
Congress for consideration in cases of 
emergency and to secure relief, and that 
is very proper: we are issuing money to 
banks or artificial ])ersons on satisfactory 
security and permit them to loan to the 
]ieople on short time and high rates of 
interest if satisfactory security is offered, 
but there are a great many of our peo])le 
who are really in need of help, really in 
need of assistance, who are not in a posi- 
tion to get their claims presented to Con- 
gress. This bill is intended to furnish 
relief to deserving people who cannot avail 
themselves of the provisions of the bank- 
ing laws where security is required and 
short time given and a high rate of interest 
exacted, but who will be able to secure 
the Government from kiss. This bill is not 
intended to take the place entirely of the 
rural credit bills which have been intro- 
duced, but it is intended to supplement 
those measures." 



Cheapest Non-Union Workers. 

"Detroit has the cheapest non-union cigar 
factories in the Ihiited States — a down- 
trodden class of cigar workers, powerless, 
underpaid, overworked, who have nothing 
to .say as to what they should receive in 
wages, hours, or shop conditions," declares 
Cigarmakers' and Packers l^nion. No. 22, 
in a circular issued for the ])urpose of cre- 
ating public opinion against the practices 
of cigar manufacturers. 

.A Detroit paper is (juoted as saying that 
the "baby death rate in Detroit is 132 in 
1,000, which is 40 per cent higher than 
that of New \'ork city, with its miles of 
tenement houses." 

The cigarmakers continue : 

"The half-grown girl laborer and child 
bearer, the hand that rocks the cradle, will 
be found working in these non-union cigar 
traps. Those money-mad owners have 
made their pile of gold from cheap labor. 
They are all against the union shop and 
union conditions. They will not allow 
cigar girls to work in their cigar factories 
and belong to the labor union. Rut in 
spite of them, there will come an uprising 
of cigar girls for their American rights to 
belong to the labor union." 



P>attles in human blood between while 
corpuscles and disea.se germs have been 
])hot(-)graphcd with the motion picture 
camera bv two French scientists. 



An .\merican automatic telephone sys- 
tem has been established in Simla, the 
summer capital of India. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



n^sB^assass. 



JR^^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



ONE MAN'S VIEWS. 



Tho.se early reports about "bumper crops" 
seem to have been like the one time report 
of Mark Twain's death, "greatly exagge- 
rated." It is now known that this year's 
crops are. if anything, below the average. 
The food monopolists, it appears, had inside 
information of the coming of the European 
war months ahead of actual hostilities. 
J'rofits from food exports on a scale never 
before dreamed of dazzled their outlook. 
l!ut they also foresaw that their, plans 
for looting the country of foodstufifs would 
meet with decided opposition from the 
looted. Wherefore, brainy businessmen 
that they are, they caused the crop re- 
ports to be doctored so as to foreshadow 
"bumper crops." "Bumper crops" imply 
a surplus. The proper thing to do with 
surjiluses of food is, of course, to sell them 
lo foreign countries, and charge for them 
all the traffic will bear. If there is no 
surplus — well, there is an old saw, "If 
you have no virtues, assume one," which 
shows the way out. Which is just what 
the food speculators have done. They have 
"assumed" a surplus where none exists. 
Also, they are already quite profitably en- 
gaged in exporting this non-existent sur- 
plus of foodstufifs to Europe. What the 
result to this country will be is not hard 
to figure out. If you are a poor man you 
are almost certain to be made unpleasantly 
aware of it before the winter is over if the 
war in Euro])e drags that long. If it should 
open your eyes to the asinine stupidity of 
the system b)' ineans of which we dis- 
tribute the wealth which the workers of 
this nation ])roduce, all will be well, how- 
ever. For then, if you have any ideals 
at all, you will enlist in the war against 
war and for the co-operative common- 
wealth. 



You remend)er the wail of the news- 
papers some weeks ago over "the threat- 
ened shortage of unskilled labor" which 
the war in Euro])e was to bring about? 
Some of them were almost in despair lest 
there should not be enough available labor 
to harvest the "bumper crops," thus making- 
certain a "threatened shortage" of profits 
for the fond speculators. 

\\ ell, only a couple of weeks ago, at a 
season of the year when work should be 
plentiful if ever, the Associated Charities 
of New York reported 45 per cent, or about 
.^40,000, of the workers of that city out of 
employment. The conditions among the 
ixior were said to be the worst experienced 
since '??>. Long breadlines were forming 
daily in several parts of the city. Similar 
conditions ])revailed in other large cities in 
the East. The approach of winter was 
dreaded as never before. 

You hadn't heard of these things, had 
you? The newspapers are silent on the 
subject. There's a reason. 

"Seek ye the truth, for the truth shall 
set ye free," sayeth the Good Hook. 

iUit the truth about industrial condi- 
tions is the very last thing those who 
control the daily press would have you 
know. For if the truth were generally 
known to the workers, the graft of their 
exploiters would forthwith be at an end 
forever, "'i'he truth shall set ye free." 

"The passing of the sailing ship" is going 
on apace. Hereafter Lloyd's will omit the 



customary abbreviation S. S. (steam ship) 
in conjunction with the names of steamers. 
The boot will now be on the other leg. 
Sailing vessels will in the future be indi- 
cated by the letters S. \^ (sailing vessel) 
preceding their names. Nothing could more 
elocpiently emphasize the great change in 
seafaring life brought about by the intro- 
duction of steam as propelling power for 
ships. And to think that only thirty or 
forty years ago sailing ships carried the 
bulk of the world's sea-borne cargoes! 
Truly, the old order changeth. 



\n the dispatches from Europe the Czar 
is (juoted as sa}ing, "Fll enter I'erlin if it 
takes my last nioujik." 

.\ nunijik. as perhaps you know, is a 
Russian peasant. If you have read Tol- 
stoy's works you will also know that the 
average moujik is a simple-minded son of 
the soil who looks up to the Czar as "the 
little white father." To him the Czar typi- 
fies both omniscience and omnipotence to 
a degree bordering on the supernatural. 

So you see, it is not so strange after all 
that the Czar should thus casually speak 
of "my moujiks." But what is really 
strange is the fact that, so far, no com- 
ment whateser has been made anywhere 
on the propriety of the Czar's utterance. 
It is a])])arently taken for granted that the 
Czar has a perfectly natural right to do as 
lie durn well pleases with "my moujiks," 
even to having every last man of them 
slaughtered for his own personal glorifica- 
tion. 

Which shows that neither in social con- 
ditions or the state of the public mind 
does the world of to-day differ much from 
the world f)f two thousand years ago. The 
privileged few are still the acknowledged 
lords of the earth to whom pretty much all 
the rest of us are just "my moujiks." 



.Armour and Swift have contracted to 
sup])ly the French Government with one 
million pounds of beef a day for one year. 
.\ news dis])atch also states that a few 
days ago the Chicago packers made a shi])- 
ment of 3,.^0() tons of beef to Great liritain. 
()f course, it is a moral certainty that 
neither the h'rench nor ISritish will i)ay 
anything near the price for beef that we 
here at home are held up for. You may 
also note while you are about it that these 
same Chicago packers have all along been 
explaining to us that beef is so high in 
.America because there is a decided short 
age of it — the home demand greatly ex- 
ceeds the supply, etc., etc. Honest now, 
what do you think of that sort of business 
— and of the sort of government which not 
only tolerates it but even assiduously en- 
courages it? 



.Millions to ])romote conmierce with for- 
eign naticjiis ; not one cent to promote em- 
ployment for the idle at home. I'ut why 
kick? That is what you send your rei)re- 
sentatixes to Congress for ;_ to look after 
the interests of the profit mongers. 



After nineteen hundred years of ])ropa- 
gandism, Christianity is now compelled to 
apologize for Christendom. — Prof. Roswcll 
n. Hitchcock. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrOKM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A. strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 

seven, 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
S.\N FR.\NCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SE.\'lTr.K. Wasli.. 140S'/2 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
ST.'"). 

PORTI,.\Nn. Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

S.\N PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 

SE.\TTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205. Grand Trunk 
Dock. P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTI^AND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
no, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



W ar lesson No. ( )ne — Set a fool to kill ;i 
fool. 

F. H. I'URVESO.\. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SA.N FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can bo procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
al.sn at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Laborers in the sardine factories 
of Eastport, Me., are on strike for 
higher wages. They are asking for 
25 cents an hour, instead of 20 cents. 

Suspender Makers' Union No. 9560 
of New York has renewed contracts 
with its employers without any dif- 
ficulty. The agreement expires in 
.\u)j;ust of next year. 

Ranchers, farmers, lumbermen and 
fruit growers in California are or- 
ganizing to oppose the proposed 
light-hour law which will be voted 
on at the November election. The 
arguments used — "will destroy busi- 
ness"— arc of the stereotyped kind. 

Metal polishers at Detroit are 
winning their strike against the 
Caille Bros.' concern, which at- 
tempted to reduce wages and estab- 
lish the non-union — or 'V)pen" — shop. 
The firm manufactures coin devices, 
weighing machines, portable engines, 
etc. 

According to reports of delegates 
to the conference of the Eastern 
Pennsylvania Typographical Union, 
held in York, Pa., more than $150,- 
000 was added to the payroll of or- 
ganized printers in this section dur- 
ing the past year. An open meeting 
of union and non-unionists was held, 
and many of the latter were enrolled. 

Garment Workers No. 204 of 
Cleveland has signed an agreement 
with the Cleveland Custom Garment 
Company. The union is recognized, 
all demands are conceded, including 
a fifty-four-hour week, no discrimin- 
ation, and the prevailing wage rate. 
The company further agrees not to 
do any work for any strike-bound 
houses. 

Journeymen Barbers' Union and 
barber shop proprietors have joined 
hands in an effort to stop Sunday 
work in Detroit. They are using 
the public press to notify violators of 
the law that they will be prosecuted. 
The willingness of the journeymen 
lo act with their employers in bet- 
tering working conditions has 
strengthened the union. 

A friendly suit has been started 

in the Franklin (Ky.) Circuit Court 

by the State Journal Printing Com- 

panv to test the constitutionality of .Hansen. John 
' - Hardcasle, W. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 

DAY AND NIGHT 

202-4 GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DOCK SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rales Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoflice, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to 
rail or have their mail forwarded during 
that period, they should notify the Agent 
to hold mail until arrival. 

Anderson, P. F. Maas, R. 

Andersen, RagnvaldMathlsen, Nils 

Andersen, A. -1777Marx, Rhorvald 

Aylward, J. Mickelsen, M. D. 

Aifredsen. Andrew McDonald, Wm. 

Albers, Geo. Manson, Sven 

Anderson, Gust W. Merkle, G. 

Anderson, Julius L.Nass, John 

Bekker, Geo. 

Benter, Henry 

Bruin, B. de 

Bruce, Robert 

Bode, Fred 

Bye. Sigurd 

Backman, A. 

Campbell, Frank 

D. M. 

Davis, F. A. 

Doddy, C. W. 

Kngstrom, Carl 

Eriksen, C. -872 

Erikson, Erik 

Eriksen, John 

Eriksen, E. 

Fredrlksen. 

Gjelseth, I. 

Geiger, Joe 

Gundersen, Peter 

Graae, P. C 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



WCSTCRMAIM & SCHERMER 



( 220-222 
Two Stores) 103-105-107 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 

3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 

cinlty. All orders by telephone or 

telegraph promptly attended to 

Phone, Main 13 

Independent: Elliott 254 



EureKa, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ^ Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the 
Beauty," the "Princess" and 
high grade union-made cigars. 



■Little 
other 



Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
I-ager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 




the Workmen's Compensation Act, 
recently passed by the State I-egis- 
bture. .A number of employers have 
refused to comply with the act, 
claiming it is illegal, and to decide 
this question is the purpose of the 
s\iit. 



Hellisen, H. 

Hemes, K. 

Herman, Gus. 

Herman. Axel 

Hood. W. 

Hager, P. B. 

Hansen. II. O. 

Hagger, F. W. 

Jahnke, Otto 
l.lensen, Hans - 
I Johnson, Julius 
Skilled and unskilled workmen in J^nson. Alfred 

i.Tohansen, Arvid 



Nelsen. Bernt 

Nielsen, N. C. -544 

Nilsen. Andrew 

Naro. H. 

Nase, A. Knudsen 

Nielsen, H. J. 

Olsen, B. -597 

Olsen, E. -966 

Olson, C. 

Olsen, A. M. 

Olsen. Martin 

Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Paulsen, G. L. 

Petersen, S. A. 

Preuss, F. -234 

Paaso, A. 
Harold Peitzon, Jacob 

Petterson. Harry 

Rasmussen, P. A. 

Roche. John 

Rasmussen, Arthur 

RIech, F. 

RIech, J. 

Rose, W. H. 

Samuelsen. Hugo 

Shepard, Peter 

Sunde, Peter 

Schankat. Hans 

Slmminghjem, G. 
-315Saar, I. A. 

Saunders, R. 

Sheppard, Stewart 
2062Skubber. H. 

Stover, Harry 

Stuhr, H. 

K. K. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



--. Sundberg 

the plant of the Columbia Tile Com- Johansen, Geo. W. Sund, K. A 

. y-^ r. ijr -ir » 1 u I Johnson. HUmer Svensen. Ted 

pany at Grafton, W. Va., struck be- Kalllo. F. Svery. Carl 

cause of a new rule which changed Kennidy. Tom Tledeman, Joachim 

Krouss. Ernest Totz, R. 

their weekly pay day to once every Kristiansen, TrygveTahllnen, M. 

, .,„„!,„ TU„ „„. . ,„i,„ „_„ iKristiansen. K. F. Thorsen. Knot 

two weeks. The new scheme pro- Knutsen, Knut Tahti, Hjalmar 

vides that the men are to work the Kruger, J. I""i'^- ^HiP^ 

. I Larson. Hans -1595 Toosen, Thpo. 

first three weeks without pay and m T^abouple. J. P. Van Ix)0. E. 

the future be paid every two weeks '^?J-^i,J;„/s,een wfson'' P^'i:.. 

for the two weeks back. Thus the J-undberg, Jerry Wenlkke. A. 

, , , . , . , , , ' T^ynn. C. Wold. Statins 

men would be behmd two weeks Luwold, Nils Wettland. Johan 

wages on each pay day. The com- 
pany claims that the holding of this 
money "is not unusual." 

Reports received by the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Mines from State mine in- 
spectors show that 180 men were 
killed in and about the coal mines in 
the United .States during June, 1914, 
as compared with 192 during June, 

1913. Deducting five fatalities for 
which there are no comparable fig- 
ures for June, 1914. the figures be- 
come 180 for June, 1914, and 187 
for June, 1913, or a decrease of 
seven, or about four per cent, in 

1914. as compared with the previous 
vear. 



Seattle Navigation School 

Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for I^icense 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 

By 
CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master and 
Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment," Au- 
thor of "Practical Hints for Yachtsmen 
and Amateur Seamen." 
Compass Adjuster. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Res. Phone: Queen Anne 664 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next door to Master Mates and Pilots 

Conducted by CAPT. H. S. SMITH, 

Who for four years was Assist. Ins. of 

Steamboats In Seattle 



Herman Schuize 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts.. Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Line,. Wiktor 
Melgail, M. 
Murphy, Daniel 
Nilsson, Teodor 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Paterson, John 
Pettersson, C. H. 
Voss, H. 

Johannsen, Christian Whermann, William 
Karthauser, Otto Wilbrandt, Harry 
Linea. W. 



Anderson, John 
Almkvist, Emil 
Corty, Casar 
Dobbin, Harry 
Doering, E. W. 
Englund, Gust E. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Iversen, Iver 
Johansson, Charles 



F-dvin Xikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Alinni. 
who has important news from home. 
.\ddress. Mrs. Minni Hall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Tf Axel Olson and John Swanson, 
who in the autumn of 1902 were 
members of the crew of the steam- 
schooner "Fulton," will send their 
present addresses to John Gabrielson, 
Bellflower, Calif., they will receive 
news that will be of interest to them. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuana" in September, 
1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Kepeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Littra B. Nystrama St., Goteborg, 
Sweden.— 5-13-14. 

Carl Julius Carlson, born in Swe- 
den in 1877, is inquired for by his 
mother. There is about $2000 due 
him from his father's estate. Last 
heard of in September, 1902, on the 
Atlantic Coast. Previously sailed on 
the "Clififord" between St. Johns and 
New York. Address Fru Sophia 
Carlson, Klubbegard, Hallands Lan. 
Heberg, Sweden. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12£ D. St,, Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List 



Ereksen, Anton 
Ellison, Sam 
Englund, Gust 
Hansen, Harald 
Hansen, Harry 
-1827 (Photo) 



Haldorsen, Adolf 
Ingebrethsen, Alfred 
Lawrence, Harry 
Lomas, Richard 
Thorssen, Fred'k. N. 



^^^^f^*^*^^^^^^^^^^'^S^\^>^I^^S^i^S^I^S^^^^i^^^^^^ 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Andrew Wilne, native of Dundee. 
Scotland; about 28 years of age, dark 
complexion, last heard of about nine 
years ago, sailing as steward, also 
as fireman, is inquired for by his 
relatives. Address A. S. Milne, 1122 
Rose street, Grandview, Vancouver, 
B. C. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson & 
Co. at San Francisco. Cal. — 6-24-14. 

.Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderharm, .Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith. Box 
770, .Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



Portland, Ore. 
W^^T0HNS0^N 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Piione Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Checic for your baggage at home. Give 
ine your worlc or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295^ItOSENSTEINBROS. 

Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland. Ore. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 
FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, A. -1645 
Anderson, Gust. 

-1808 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Andersen, Mike 
Bergman, Karl W. 
Berglund, Ed. 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Bi'un, Mathias 
Bults, Ernest 
Bakkersen, Peter J 
Carlsen, J. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
Carlson, C. Eriand 
Campbell, Frank 
Dahl, Henry 
Deswert, William 
Day, Aca 
Danlelsen, Nils J. 
Edstrom, John 
Erman, A. 
Ekham, Frans 
England, E. 
Freitag, Franz 
Fristrom, S. 
Geiger, Josef 
Gordia, Piet 
Gynther, John 
Gravier, Eugene 
Greil, Ben 
Hansen, Max O. 
Henriksson, William 
Hellman, Albin 
Henricks, Woldemar 
Hedlund, Albert 
Holm, Aage 
Huneig, Hans 
Hansen, H. F. C. C. 
Johansen, Chris 
Jansson, D. -2166 
Johansson, Arvo 
Jacobson, A. 



Karlson, August 
Kluge, Frank 
Kelly, Patric 
L-aine, Frank 
L^irsen, John 
Dewik, Karl 
Dutzen, VVald. 
Mathson, Nils 
Matliiassen, Sigurd 
Maass, K. 
Meckerman, Ernest 
Marx, Ihorwald 
Mikaisen, Andreas 
Mo berg, Karl 
Nelssen, C. J. 
Nilsson, Axel 
Nielsen, Knstian 
Narberg, Jolin 
Olsen, Arthur 
Olsen, Ansgar 
Olson, J. \V. 
Olsen, John Andreas 
Phillip, Max 
Petterson, Einar 
Peterson, Hans 
Petersson, M. 
Pettersson, VV. H. 
Pelz, Gottfried 
Pohland, Max 
Petersen, John 
Rautio, Jacob 
Reincke, Herman 
Rhodes, F. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Simens, O. L. 
Scott, James 
Schulz, Alfred 
Wieprecht, Ernest 
Welsen, J. 
Walter, John 
Woldhouse, John 



^fVWW*^WWW>^^/WW>^W-^>^V>,'>^>rV^%^VN^ 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, -1118 
Arnell, John 
Behn, Alfred 
Bowen, J. J. 
Butler, J. E. 
Bergman, L.. J. 
Chnstensen, Albert 
Carlstrom, John 
Debus, F. 
de Dange, Ingolf 
Doyle, W. 
Ernandes, Frisco 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
I'orde, S. C. 
Graf, Otto 
Gronros, Oswald 
Hansen, Ove Max 
nusche, H'y 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
Jacobson, Arthur 
Jonansen, Hans 
Johansen, A. H. 
Jeutaft, Sigurd 
Kallas, Alek 
Kristiansen, -1093 
Koski, Chas. 
Kustel, V. J. 
Loining, Hermand 
Lcngtssen, Gottfried 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Larsen, Hans 
McLean, H. 
Martin, James 
Mackenzie, Hector 
G. 



Munsen, Fred 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nilsen, Alf. W. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsen, Oswald -1059 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olasen, Chas. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Pettersen, Olaf 
Peterson, Nels 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Roberts, I. 
Sim, Gunder 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Sormato, Matti 
Strom, C. 
Schultz 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Vilen, T. 
Walder. Olsen N. 
Zebe, G. V. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Solberg, Peter 
Stanners, W. S. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, age about 44, is en- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Gal. 7-22-14 



vWORKERS UNION 




UNION^pSTAMP 

Factory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers* Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS Of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 




ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMEN'r 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive P.wner of _ "The Red Front" 

When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Slices, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News ® Drug Co. 

Headquarters 
SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. WISKAH STREET, ABERDEEN 
SMOKE 

"ThinK of Me" and 
"White Squadron" 

CIGARS 

Made by 

L. L. MALEY, Aberdeen, Wash. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Headquarters for 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

4201/2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS. 



LEADING JEWELERS 



Have Moved to 

318 E. HERON STREET 

Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

ABERDEEN ...:,,,:„ ^ ^ y^/f^^^rJ^^SJ^S. 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Mclson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 
1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at San Francisco. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communiacte with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Gal. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansbcrg, Norway, aged about 50, 
last iicard of at Melbourne, Australia, 
is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 



Home News. 



President Wilson has signed the 
hill appropriating $1,000,000 for the 
extra expenses of the American 
diplomatic and consular service dur- 
ing the European war. 

The U. S. Senate has passed the 
million-dollar appropriation for ex- 
tra expenses of diplomatic and con- 
sular service occasioned by the Eu- 
ropean war. It has already passed 
the House and now goes to the Pres- 
ident. 

An announcement by Secretary 
Lane said that 6830 acres of land in 
California arid districts have been 
included in public water reserves. 
These lands surround springs in the 
deserts of Eastern and Southeastern 
California, and their chief value is to 
travelers and prospectors, who, by 
reason of the withdrawal, will be 
assured free access to water. 

The policy committee of the Uni- 
ted Mine Workers of America has 
called a convention of miners to be 
held at Trinidad to consider and act 
on the truce terms submitted by 
President Wilson for ending the Col- 
orado coal miners' strike. Repre- 
sentatives of the mine operators are 
expected to call a conference some 
time next week to prepare their re- 
ply to the President. 

Representative Hobson has intro- 
duced a resolution proposing that 
President Wilson call a special as- 
sembly of delegates to the third in- 
ternational peace conference, which 
was to have met at The Hague, in 
Washington, "as soon as practicable" 
to attempt to end the European war. 
It is proposed that afterward a ses- 
.sion be held in San Francisco in 
1915. An appropriation of $150,000 
for expenses was proposed. 

President Wilson sent his second 
\eto message to Congress on Sep- 
tember 11. He disapproved the bill 
authorizing increase of the maximum 
limit of postal savings deposits from 
$500 to $1000. He did not disap- 
prove of raising the deposit limit, 
but of another section permitting 
deposits of such funds in State 
banks. His first veto was for rein- 
statement of an army ofificer. two 
weeks prior. 

Beef packers of the United States 
are now in absolute control of the 
Argentine output of beef, thus de- 
stroying the value of Argentine beef 
as a competitive check on the price 
of native beef, according to testi- 
mony given before Chief Magistrate 
McAdoo in New York at the inquiry 
into the advance in food prices. 
Jacob Bloch, member of a firm own- 
ing several meat markets, asserted 
that every bit of beef from Argen- 
tina must now l)c bought from the 
American packers. 

While secrecy is being maintained 
by the United States Army concern- 
ing unusual activities in the fortifi- 
cations about New York city and at 
the proving grounds at Sandy Hook, 
most of them, the army officers have 
let it become known, have to do with 
the armament and complete cquip- 
rneiit of the great fortifications of the 
Panama Canal. Nmnerous in(|uirics 
are made of the newspaper offices for 
information concerning "terrific can- 
nonading" heard in the vicinity of 
the entrance to New York harbor. 
I While some of this heavy firing has 
jlueii tlu' day and night target drills 
I by the big guns of Ft. Hancock on 
Sandy Hook, most of the firing has 
been by new guns that arc being 
tested at the proving grounds for the 
Paiiam;i Canal fortifications. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




During the 45 days that the Brit- 
ish steamer "Singapore" was in tran- 
sit between Boston and Buenos 
Aires, her cargo of Argentine corn 
increased $7,200 in value. She 
brought 40,000 bushels of corn. 

The present war will cause a very 
large amount of marine insurance 
business to change hands. Open cov- 
ers and slips opened with agencies 
of German companies have had to 
be replaced, in many cases at con- 
siderably higher rates than those 
previously paid. British companies 
have been able to secure the services 
of the agents of some of the German 
companies, and have taken over the 
business entirely. One effect of the 
cessation of German companies ac- 
cepting business has been to limit 
the market for general business, and 
underwriters have not hesitated to 
put up rates accordingly. 

Cargoes adjudicated lawful prizes 
by the British prize court are being 
(|uietly disposed of. It is sixty years 
since a prize court sat in Great 
Britain. As the last prize court sat 
during th'^ Crimean War, the pro- 
cedure v.-hen the present war broke 
out was antiquated. But a revision 
of the old rules was recently made 
by committees under the late Lord 
Gorell and Mr. Aspinall. K. C, and 
new rules came into operation Au- 
gust 4. As to the prize law itself, 
the Code contained in the Naval 
Prize Bill of 1911 w^as rejected by 
the House of Lords. Owing to the 
same rejection, the Privy Council 
remains still the final court of appeal 
from the British Prize Court, as the 
International Court proposed at the 
same time was never set up. 

Assistant Secretary Sweet of the 
Department of Commerce said that 
difficulty had been met in effecting 
transfer of ship registry in only one 
case, that of the British steamer 
"Robert Dollar" at Rio de Janeiro. 
Delay in this case, he said, wa: only 
temporary, and had been caused by 
.T customshouse error. E. L. Char- 
mont, counselor of the Brazilian 
Embassy, inquired of Solicitor John- 
ston at the State Department if the 
American Government had on record 
any precedent since the outbreak of 
the present war for the change in 
registry of merchant ships. The 
Brazilian Government is investiga- 
ting the status of the "Robert Dollar." 
Mr. Johnston cited the cases of the 
"Niagara" and "Buffalo," which 
changed their flags at San Francisco. 
The Black Diamond Collier "Lin- 
gan" rammed and sank the Govern- 
ment steamer "Montmagny" on Sep- 
tember 18 during a fog a mile below 
Crane Island, in the St. Lawrence 
River. Fourteen persons, members 
of the "!Montmagny's" crew and of 
families of two lighthouse keepers 
aboard the "Montmagny" lost their 
lives. Second Officer Las Chance, 
of the "Montmagny," was among 
those who perished. He died with 
two children in his arms, in a heroic, 
but unsuccessful, attempt to rescue 
them. Survivors were picked up by 
the steamer collier "Potana" and 
taken to Grosse Isle. The "Mont- 
magny" was on her way from Que- 
bec to the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and 
the Strait of Belleisle. N. F. She 
bad aboard a cargo of coal and pro- 
visions for wireless stations and sig- 
nal service stations along the coast. 
.'\ltbough the "Montmagny" was not 
a passenger vessel, she was utilized 
to transport the families of the light- 
house keepers at Belleisle and Flower 
Island to their stations. 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

52 EAST STREET, Opp. Ferry Depot, San Francisco 
JOE WEISS Telephone Kearny 3771 

Union Made Shoes 

FOR MEN EXCLUSIVELY 

NEW STORE! NEW GOODS! 

NEW MACHINERY! 

Call and Inspect our new up-to-date quarters 

Repairing done while you wait by the latest machinery 

Work called for and delivered 

We use only the best leather market affords 

We can save you money by purchasing your next pair of shoes from us. 



Phone Douglas 198 UNION LABEL USED 

NOVELTY TAILORING CO. 

Third Floor Phelan Building 
760 MARKET STREET 



WORKSHOP CUTTING DEFT. SALES DEPT. 

Room 325 Room 327 Room 329 

Represented by F. SEL.^NDER, Assistant Secretary 




San Francisco Letter List. 

I-etters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
montlis only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Anton Anderson, .Johannes 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Sam 
Andersson, A. -1S19 
Andreassen, Morgan 
Antonsen, Herman 
Appelgren, John 



Abrahamsen 

Ahl. Theo. 

Alberlson, Chris 

Albons. Arney 

Alexander, James 

Andersen, A. 

Andersen, Andrew 

Andersen, Arnfeldt Arnecke. Carl 

Anderson, EdvarU Attel, Alf 

Andersen, Nela Auer, William 

Andersen, K. P. Austin, Tom 

Anderson. Hildurg 



Raars, Hans 
Packman, Paul 
Bakkenson. P. J. 
Hung, Mauritz 
Hauer, Andrew 
Behr. H. 
Heinieir, Peter 
Bendfeld. Charley 
Hensen, nick 
Benson, Gus 
Berg. John 
Berghalm, Edward 
BtTgcivist, K. -1395 
Bergslrom. A. 
Bjorseth, Knut 



Callon. 


Josh. 


Campbell, D. C. 


Campbell. Geo. 


Cariera. 


Pete 


Carlson 


A. A. 


Carlson, 


R. 


Carlson 


C. Erland 


Carlson 


Jack 


Carlson 


John 


Carlson 


, Joseph 


Carlson 


Walter 


nalen. 


Wm. K. 


Dallman, H. 


Daubbs 


Paul 


Davis, 


Frank A. 


Davis, 


Gala 


Davey, 


C. 


Debus, 


Fredrick 



De I.andtshier, John 

lOaton. William II. 
Ebv, Ivar. D. 
Edolf, K. 
Eggers, .lohn 
Ehlert, Ernest 
Ellsworth, James 
Elofson, John 
Elone. Emanual 

Farnen, M. S. 
Faulkner. J. 
Fipdler. Emil 
Filler. Edward 
Finn. Cnas. 
Fischer, W. -707 
Fitzpatrick. P. 
Folvik, Lewis 

Gabrilsen, idling 
Gaby, J. 
Gasch. William 
Gla.ss. W. 
(jrnn.strnm. Nestar 
Grigoleit. Ed. 

Haave. Norvald 
I laggar. Fred 
Hallenberg. Giislaf 
llallen. Carl 
Hallnwes. I^ouis N. 
Hall. Svere 
Ilalvarsen, H. 
ITalvorsen, Isack 
Halvorscn. Olaf 
Hank. A. K. 
Hannus, Alex. 
Hansen. Bernhard 
Hansen, Carl 
Hansen. C. T. 

H. C. 

H. P. 

Jerry 

J. -2156 

Ol.Tf 

Oscar 
Thomas 



Blanco, D. 
Blacker. John 
Boers, M. 
Borgen, John 
Bowman, William G. 
Brander, William 
Brandt. Oscar 
Bravich, Johan 
Brennan, I'atrick 
Broberg, C. 
Brushard, Ewalt 
Bryan, John 
Brynjulfson. Halvar 
Bye, Sigurd 
Bynum, Joe 

Carron, Edward 
Carry. Peter A 
Christensen, Alfred 
Chrlstensen, Fred. 

R. 
Cockell, Rrank 
("onnolly, O. 
Connolly, Stephen 
Costa, Casimiro 
Cord. P. 
Crosman, Geo. 

l>e Rose, Jack 
Deswert, William 
Digman. Carl A. 
Dixon, John 
Dohmann, Ferdinand 
Doose. Wm. 
Dreyer, Carl 



Ericson, Gust. 
iOriksen, Bernhard 
Eriksen, Kar A. 
Krikson, -S80 
Krikson, E. 
Eskildsen, A. P. 
Evans, Stanley C. 

Forsgren, Carl 
Fredholm, C. J. P. 
F'rediksen. B. D. 
Freiberg. P. 
F'ricke, W. 
Friedland. C. J. 
French, .lack 



Gronnevick. Isack 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gustafson. Gus 
Gustafsson. Ivar 
Gutman, Charles 



Hansen, 
Hansen. 
Hansen, 
Hansen. 
Hansen, 
Hansen. 
Hansen, 

-1769 
Hansson. Harold 
Harmening. Fred 
Hartog, ,Iohn 



Hawkins, Fred 
Haws. Arthur 
Heckel, Max 
Holdal. Trygve 
Helin, Aaana 
Hellsten, Gus. 
Helpap, .\ugust 
Henry. H. A. 
Herman, Jack 
Hewitt. Peter 
Hiks. Gustav 
Hilke, Karl 
Hoffman, J. 
Hogelund. Andrew 
Hollman. Martin 
Holmlund, Arthur 
Holm. Carl 
Holm. S. 
Hoist. R. 
Hovring, H. J. 
Hoye. Hookon 
Hubner. C. F. W. 
Huse, Ed. 
Hyde, Carl 



Ikivalko 
llllg, Gus 
.lacklin, Carl 
Jacobsen. John 
Jakobsen, Oie 
Jamisch, Ed W. 
Jansson, Chas. 
Jensen, C. 
Jensen, Fredrick 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Harry 
Jensen, H. G. 
Jensen, Just 
Jensen, William 
Jespersen, Martin 



Iversen, Iver 

Johansen, Johan 
Johansen, Louis 
Johansen, S. W. 
Johansen, Willy 
Johanssen, Emil 
Johansson. Johan 
Jolinsen, G. -950 
Johnson, A. K. 
Johnson, I). 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson, Jakob 
Johnson, John 



Johannesen, Einar Johnson, Pete 
Jolianssen, A. F. Johnson, Robert 
Johansen, Alf. Johnson, R. W. 

Johannessen, Anton Jokstad, Sigurd O. 
Joliansen, Carl -804 Jones, Berthon 
Joliansen, Carl -1593 Jorgensen. Aage 
Jolianssen, Carl -2094Jorgensen, H. P. 
Joliansen, Eduard 



Kulbarg, Nel« 
Kalkin, Fred 
Kallasman, E. 
Kallio, Frans 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kalios, Alex. 
Kalnin, E. 
Kargen, Fred 
Karlsen, Jakob 
Karlseii, Martin 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Kasen. Frudu 
Kelly, Edwar* 
Kenny. J. 
Lacy, Thos. E. 
Lala, August 
Laponble, Jean P. 



Kesher, Karl 
Kiesow, Paul 
Kindlund, Otto 
Klebingat, Fred 
Klette, Ernst 
Knappe, Adolph 
Knudsen, Lauritz 
Kohne, Ernst 
Konopacki. Martin 
Kristiansen. L. P. 
Krlstjan, A. W. 
Kroeger. Henry 
Krutman, K. 
Kuhlmann, Louis 
Lee, Ernest 
Leidecker. Elite 
Lepp, August 



Lapschies, Edward Lewis. Hoy H. 



Larson, A. L 
Larsen, Alf 
Larsen, Georg L. 
Larsen, Gus 
Larsen, T. 
Larson, C. 
Larson, H. P. 
Lauger, Kobert 
Laws, Harry 
Lawton, R. S. 
Leckscher, Henry 

-1684 

Maatson, Olaf -2046Matta, John 
Makelor, Gustave Mavar, James 
Maksnes, Kristian 
Maland, Ole J 

A 



Lindgren, Richard 
Line, W. 
Linhqulst, G. 
Lohne. E. 
Loining, Herman 
Lorense, W. 
Love. S. C. 
Luberg. Willem 
Ludwig, Edmund 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Lundblad, Ernst 



MalnLstrom, C. 
Maltti, J. 
Manss. Fred 
Markley, Paul 
Markman. Harry 



Mayes. J. B. 
McCann 

McConnell, David 
McKeating. R. 
McKenzie, M. 
McMahon, J. T. 
Miller, Herman 



Markmann, Heinrirh Mogelberg. Harry 
Markus. Golfred Mon.sen, Martin 

Martenz. Paul -2262Moore, C. C. 
Martens, Paul Morris, Benjamin 

Masters, C. Morris, Oscar R. 

Martensen, I. C.-2191 Morrison, Wm. 
Mathisen, Charley Moure, Peter 
Matliisen. Christian Mueller. A. R. 
Matliiesen. Ludvig Mudda, A. 



Matlisen, Olaf 
Matson, Henning 
Nar. P. Niels 
Narup, Carl 
Naunian, Alfred 
Nel.'ien, Ernest C. 
Nelson, Nels 
Nel-son, V'iclor 
Nerby, Kristian 
Nerlin. 'J'hns. 
Neubert, H. 
Nielsen, Ingolf 
Nielsen, L. 
Obcrg, C. W. 
O'Connor, W. F. 
Olafsson, Melchoir 
Olmann, P. 
Olsen, Alfred 
Olsen, Charles 
Olsen. Ferdinand 
Olsen, Geo. 
Olson, Geo. W. 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, Jens 
Ol.sen, Jolin A. 
Olsen, M. E. 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, Ole -1047 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, O. -1283 

Palm, A. 
Palmer, P. 
Parrell. William 
Partaner, Johan 
Paulsen. Alex. 
Paulsen, James 
Paultin, Martin 
Pearson, John L. 
Pearson, Victor 
Pedersen. Carl 



Murray, C. P. 

Nilsen, H. J. 
Nllson, Ragnard 
Nllsson, -1141 
Nordin, Gus 
Nordstrom. Wiitor 
.Novdiniroff, M. 
Nurhanan. I. 
Nurml. Victor R. 
Nylander, Edwin R. 
Nyman, A. 

Olsen, Otto 
Olsen, Oswald 
Olsen. Paulus 
Olsen, Peter 
Olson. M. 
Olson. Marius 
Olson, S. 
Olson, Sam 
Olsson. G, B. 
Olsson, C. G. -1101 
Olsson, James 
Ondrasck, Ralph 
O'Nell, James 
Osalin, Oscar 
Ossis, Andrew 
Osterman, Oscar 
Ovarnstrom, H. 

Pedersen, Eillf 
Pedersen, Hans 
Pedersen, Halftan 
Pederson. Sofus R. 
Perscn, Oskar 
Petersen. -1564 
Petersen. H. -1360 
l^etcrsen, .John A. 
Peterson, Mauritz 
Petersen, Olaf, -1595 



Petersen. Oscar E. 
Petersen, Otto 
Petersen, S. A. 
Peterson. Soren 
Pettersen. F. -1526 
Petterssnn. Opiav 

-1551 
Petz, Fritz 
Rnal.sen. Fred 
Ramberg, B. A. 
Has-niu.ssen. .\n(lrew 
Hayniond, Frank L. 
Regan, .lohn 
Reine, G. 
Repson, Ed. 
Richardson, E. O. 
Richter, Niels 
Saarinen. Werner 
Sager. Ed. 
Salger. Julius 
Saliiiela, Julius 
Salvesen, S. 
-Sancherd, Vincent 
Sander, Robert 
Sandseter, Paul 
Sanlos, Ben 
Saunders. James 
Schaaner, N. C. 
Scheffler, Samuel 
Sclimidt, Berhard 
Sell roller. Friedrick 
Scluiltz. Albert 
Schulze, Paul 
Scott. Emil 
Seagreen, C. 
Seidel. W'illi 
Shaffer, H. 
Sliallgroon. .Inhn 
Shankat. Hans 
Shem, A. 
Sherry, J. H. 
Shields. J. J. 
Sinimonds, J. 
Simonsen. Sigvard 
SJoblom, Karl A. 
Tamman, Krispin 
'I'amniola, Vaino 
Tillman, Charley 
Theraln. John E. 
Tho. Johan 
Thomas. Edward 

Uhlman, Axel 
TTlla. Ole. O. 

Vanderberg, Geo. Velson. Frank 
Van Katwljk, J. W.Verfard, Frank 



Pillson, Eduard 
Porath. Ben 
Prannels, W. 
Prinz. Carl 
Publicatus. Augu.^t 
Punis, Antony 
Puze, A. 

RIgnell. Joe 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Robinsboom, E. 
Rosenhlad. Axel 
Rosendahl, Kniid 
Rosenfeild, A. 
Rosenquist, A. 
Ruise, — 
Rutte, Peter 
Slenning, Joseph 
Smalmberg, Otto 
Smith, Percy S. 
Sogren. John 
Sonnenlierg. J. C. 
Sorby, Olaf 
Soren sen. C. J. T. G. 
Sorensen, Peter 
Sorensen, Soren 
Staff, Andreas 
Stein, Emil 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Sterling, H. 
Stncker. Johti 
Strauss, Walter 
Strom, Kahl 
Swanscn, O. 
Swanson. Jack 
Swanson. John 
Swansson. Oskar 
Swartley. Norman 
Sundl, Oscar 
Sun.lberg. K. K. 
Rundharm, Fred 
Svensson, S. K. -2675 
Swenson, Bernh.-ird 
Symons, W. J. 

Thompson, E. 
Thoiiip.son. Theodore 
Thompson, Thomas 
Tornguist. M. 
Thoren, Gus 
Thorsen, Otto 

Ulmar, John 



Wagner, W. 
Wahl. J. 
Waldhouse, John 
Wald, S. 
Wallgren. I. M. 
Walsli, B. 
Wanderlid, J. 
Wedeking. William 
Weiss, V. 
Welsen. .lulius 
Welson, R. 
Weltz. Ornulf 



Werner. Paul 
Westgaard, John 
Westman, A. 
Wiback, Walter 
Wii k.-strom. .-Vntone 
Wlllert, Charles 
Wilsen, Billy 
Wilson. C. J. 
Winimer. Geo. 
Wind. Jacob 
Winther, H. H. 
Wortman, Wm. 



Zankert. Karl Zoerb. Walter 

Zechel, Walter Zornig, Harry 

Zimnieiiiiig. Fred 

PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Anderson, A. Laydon, D. 

.\nderson, Andrew Lundberg, Oskar 

Anderson. Axel Mehrtens, H. K. 
Atlianasele. DemetreMlles. I. P. 

Beling, Oscar Olsen. Arne 

Bode. W. V. Olsen. Carl -1101 

Carter, H. Olsen, W. S. -1229 

Ceelan. John Raasch, O. 

Christoffersen, Olaf Rarly, Frans. 

Ellefsen. Otto Rasmussen, Emil 

Erlckson, P. Rathke, Reinhold 

Finnelly. Wm. Relursen, A. L. 

Gjarth, Petrus Roslin, Robert 



Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, Marius 
Hendrlksen. Hag- 

bart 
Joliansen. Emil 
Johnson. R. W. 
Jorgensen. Oluv 
Klette, E. F. 
Laas, J. 



Sander. R. 
Schroder, Aug. 
Skellerey, A. 
Sorensen, Pete 
Summers, J. J. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Wakely. R. E. 
Walters, Albert B. 
Wurthman, W. I.. 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maratime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Apply to 1. N. HYLEN, 49 Clay St. 

TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET, near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
York, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name, 200 Fair Oaks 
ave., Pasadena, Cal. 7-29-14 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourtli and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches tor Receipt and 
Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere street. 

June 30, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

For the six months ending June 30, 
1914, a dividend to depositors of 4% per 
annum was declared. 

Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Capt, Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 



Union 

MADE 

5eer 




•Ale 

AND 



Porter 



^^h Of America Jc^>^ 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



News from Abroad. 



Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

. NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



0. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 



HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



^7» 1\. yy ^'•"V W ^^ r~^ T~^ £r» See that this label (in light 

i^ IVI i. J K fcLHC 5^1->, ;pp;- ii:^i box in 



Issued by AuUloiK/of tne Ciga/ MaKe/s' ImernaUonal Union of Amenci 

Union-inade Cigars. 

(Jlli$ (Sntififil Tll^tth•C^«anlaml^lnthl>Whmll»lll•«br•^llS•|telmn(■ll 

1 UUm OF THE (XAK lUKf IS 'imUIIUTICMU. UMON ol AMfici. u orunizatioe devoted t« tfia ad 

iwiasoit or itt IIORAl>W7D)l*ljiv) inmirauAl WU'AM Of nit CRMt Itanfon m raraaaen 

UivM Ctqtn to all snxAan OitowNxit Uw worid 

r «ll WnaguMU ii»a> itu Utel td te puubid tceattiq UhM 



FAC 
*»• MMILE 



^ }1C (jh/iCut^. Pttadent. 
V CMtUcf 



-;.ii*.,t««v<^i«VSO««y^t?«y^<^v.*?!^J-:^KS^^^ 



LOCAL 



STAMP 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir F"olders. Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 

Phone Garfield 7S33 E. Benvenuti, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Larsc Sunny Rooms Furnished up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: .25, .30 
and .50 per day. $1.25 per Week and 
up. Special rates for Housekeeping, 

Single or Connecting Rooms. 
This Place Must Be Seen to Be Appre- 
ciated. Nothing Like It in the City. 

1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

"114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

M. WICKS 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

60 STEUART STREET 

San Francisco 

Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
OfRce Hours: 9 a. rn. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICREL 

DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 5390 

ANCHOR HOUSE 



S. PETERSON, Prop. 



495 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Samuel Dickson, a seaman, aged 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of' Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
fs requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
'shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 




Clear Havana Cigars 
of Highest Type 

UNION MADE 

ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
Francisco. 



Pa. 



] 



San 

Albertsen, Hans 

Christian 
Andersen, K. AV. 
Andersen, Gus 
Boers, .1. G. 
Bloom, A. A. 
Bernhard, Oscar 
Colbert, M. J. 
C'ohn, W. R. 
lOricksen, Karl 
lOricksen, O. 10. 
Findlay, J. 
Hans, Nick 
Herno, Fred 
Hallen, Victor 
Happmer, H. 



Jacona, Carnido 
Janssan, Axel 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson, John K. 
Kathy, Albert 
Lundquist, Fritz 
Magnussen, Maprnus 
Nieman, Ausnst 
Olson, John 
Orabrovae 
Petersen, Chas. F. 
Roelfs, J, 
Roelfs, J. 
Rinta, Carl 
Schult!!, F. J. 
"Wallen, E. 



Seattle, Wash. 



Abolln, Adam 
Borgen, K. Slgurd- 

sen 
Dahl, Ben. 
Fister, Johannes 
Flnnlgan, I. H. 
Hagen, Gunder 
Jensen, Gustav 
Johansen, Ingvald 
Johnson, Axel 
Nelson, Nels Wll- 

helm 
Larsen, Fred 
Magnuson, P. A. 



Osterlund, Albert 
Olsson, Sigfrld 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phlster, Albert 
Polhome, Mr. 
Ridderstaff, Ernest 
Rye, F. M. J. 
Selbaci:, Chris. 
Slinning, Rasmus O. 
Spellman, Tom 
Starks, John 
Stein, George G. 
Stlxrud, Jack 
Stromsness, Oscar 



A regiment of 3000 sailors has been 
(jrganized in Paris to police the city 
during the war. Retired and active 
naval oflicers have been appointed as 
regimental officers. The colonel is 
a naval post-captain. 

The Japanese Government has pro- 
hibited the publication of the Japan 
Daily I-Ierald and the Deutsche Japan 
I^ost, newspapers in Yokohama. 
Martin Otswald, editor of the Post, 
has been expelled from Japan. 

A woman suffrage bill was rejected 
by the Swedish Parliament on Au- 
gust 23. It was supported by the 
Liberal and. Socialist parties and had 
passed the second chamber, but was 
rejected in the first. 

\\\ eclipse of the sun took place 
on August 22 and was observed by 
English, Dutch, German and Swedish 
expeditions in the north of Sweden, 
where it was total. There was a 
clear sky and observations were re- 
ported successful. 

The Wilson passenger liner "Rune," 
with 600 passengers on board, struck 
a mine in the North sea and was 
sunk on September 5. All of the 
crew and passengers, with the ex- 
ception of about twenty Russian ref- 
ugees, were saved. 

Japan's activities against Kiau- 
Chau have not yet led to open war- 
fare. Japanese troops are reported 
to have landed at several points on 
the coast near the German colony. 
Kiau-Chau is said by military ex- 
perls to be very strongly fortified, 
and to be provisioned for three 
months. 

The Chilean Government has given 
pecuniary aid to 106 nitrate firms in 
order to prevent a stoppage of work, 
rendering several thousand men idle. 
The Government and Parliament are 
considering measures for the assist- 
ance of other industries, which are 
suffering in consequence of the re- 
striction of their exports to Europe 
owing to the war. 

The most important sea fight that 
has taken place occurred of? the Is- 
land of Heligoland between German 
and English fleets of cruisers, de- 
stroyers and submarines. According 
to the crews of the British destroy- 
ers returning to England, eleven 
German ships of various sizes were 
stink. The German loss in killed and 
wounded is. given as 870, the English, 
at 67. 

.'\ large increase in the emigration 
from Poland to the United States 
and Canada is noted by the British 
consul at Warsaw in his annual re- 
port just issued. In 1900-4 the aver- 
age yearly number of emigrants was 
29,992, and in 1905-9 it was 48,433; 
in 1010 the total reached 63,63.S, but 
in the year ended June 30, 1913, it 
was 174,365, chiefly farm laborers. 
.\ i)easant owning 19^ acres of land 
in Poland, he states, is "hardly able 
to make both ends meet." 

Danger from Indian domination in 
Northern Mexiso has been reported 
to the .State Department at Wash- 
ington. Tt was asserted by consuls 
in .Soiiora state that Governor Jose 
Maria Maytorena, who recently re- 
belled against the Carranza central 
government, was under the power of 
Urbalejo, a Yaqui leader, wIk) had 
been dictating every policy of the 
.Sonora governor. These threatening 
reports followed assurances that all 
had been arranged in Sonora at the 
recent conference at Nogales at- 
tended by Generals Villa and Obre- 
gon. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



The school-girl with the large feet 
was sitting with them stretched far 
out into the aisle, and was busily 
chewing guin, when the teacher 
espied her. 

"Mary!" called the teacher, sharp- 

"Yes, ma'am?" questioned the pupil. 
"Take that gum out of your 
mouth and put your feet in." 



An English clergyman turned to a 
Scotsman and asked him: 

"What would you be were you not 
a Scot?" 

The Scotchman said, "Why, an 
Englishman, of course." 

Then the clergyman turned to the 
gentleman from Ireland and asked 
him: "What would you be were 
you not an Irishman?' 

The man thought for a moment 
and said: "I'd be ashamed of my- 
self." 



It was a beautiful evening, and 
Ole, who had screwed up courage 
to take Mary for a ride, was carried 
away by the magic of the night. 

"Mary," he asked, "will you marry 
me?" 

"Yes, Ole," she answered softly. 

Ole lapsed into a silence that at 
last became painful to his fiancee. 

"Ole," she said desperately, "why 
don't you say something?" 

"Ay tank," Ole replied, "they banc 
too much said already." 



The teacher wanted some plums in 
order to give an object-lesson during 
school hours, and, calling one of the 
small boys, she gave him ten cents 
and despatched him to the fruit 
stand down on the corner. 

"Before you buy the plums, 
Willie," she cautioned, "you had bet- 
ter pinch one or two to make sure 
they are ripe." 

Little Willie flitted away. Soon he 
came back and smilingly put the 
bag on the teacher's desk. 

"Oh, thank you, Willie," said the 
teacher, taking up the bag. "Did 
you pinch one or two as I told you 
to do?" 

"Did I?" was the gleeful response. 
"I pinched the whole bagful, and 
here's your ten cents." 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 
money In a reliable savings bank. If 
you are making money now, why not 
put aside something for a rainy day? 
. . Savings and Commercial Depts., . . 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observation* 
Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN &i CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING CO. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



-coi»s»d6iilMi>ull»nl) o( th« t-»- e 
ITDUm) WORKERS ,j«6S!lk."'™l"''1l"<^ 



UNION 



^^^^-^^^J^^^^tl JVLA.DB 



Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
he avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 





ONE BIG STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, WatchmaKers, Opticians 

No purchase too small to be appreciated. To prove this, we sell: 

ALARM CLOCKS, 45c UP WATCHES, $1.00 UP 

EYE GLASSES, 50c UP 



YOU Can Start a 

Bank Account 

With Only 

51c. 



You don't 
need one dollar 
to start a bank 
account when 
you have one 
of HALE'S Sa- 
vings Banks 
It takes but 
50c to purchase 
one of our com 
pact little Jl.OO 
Banks, and one 
cent starts the 
account. 

Your savings will be just as safe 
from the temptation to open It on 
a moment's impulse as In a Savings 
Bank, because each Bank Is fitted 
with a patented lock, the key to 
which we keep. That is the BIG 
FEATURE of these Banks. We will 
open it at any time upon presenta- 
tion at Transfer Desk — Main Floor — 
you do what you please with the 
money. 

These Banks are made of tempered 
steel, with neat oxidized copper finish. 
Inquire at Transfer Desk — Main 
Floor. 





jWt>aD ooopa ^ 

Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STRETET 
72 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



^^^^^A^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^^VW^r^^^/W^'o^tf^^ 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMIEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Opp. S. p. Depot at Third & Townsend 

Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



CjafiBosTtn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

ilRGOMUTStW 



■**"^ ^i-.--'^- 




a^^^^r^r^^^-^c^-^T-^-YY^ V ^ ■^" " ^ ^«i ^ ^ ^fiirfR=fr-ih'i-T<tii 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
OfHcial Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVIII, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1914. 



Whole No. 2297. 



WAR AND THE INTERESTS OF LABOR. 



An Irrefutable Argument Why Workers Should Frown Upon Bloody Conflicts. 



War, to the modern industrial laborer, is stark 
calamity and nothing more. It is a trade in 
which the price he pays may include pain of 
body and anguish of spirit, wounds, disease, and 
death, distress to his family and perhaps its dis- 
persal and utter ruin. And the things thus 
dearly bought, national victory and national 
aggrandizement, are of no profit to the indus- 
trial worker. His private possessions are not 
increased; his toil is not lightened, his life is 
not made brighter. War may increase his 
country's dominions, but the extension of bound- 
aries offers no wider prospect to the worker or 
to his children. Grant that they participate in 
the feeling of enlarged personal significance 
which accompanies national greatness: it is a 
feeling that does not often kindle a conscious- 
ness dulled by toil. The luxury of the large 
map — what a thing for a wage-worker to die 
for! 

To the exposition of such a doctrine of war in 
its relation to labor thousands and tens of thou- 
sands of socialistic writers and lecturers are 
devoting much of their energies. The doctrine 
may sound strange to many of us, but among 
the eight or ten millions of Socialists there can 
hardly be one to whom it sounds strange, and 
very few who would consider it false. Although 
the Socialists are most active in its promulga- 
tion, we should be greatly in error if we sup- 
posed that it is taught by Socialists alone. 
Organized labor everywhere hears it repeated, 
not by revolutionists, but by the most conserva- 
tive labor leaders. Others may win or lose 
through war; the laborer can only lose. It is 
a theory; but it is a theory more widely held 
and more unreservedly accepted than many other 
theories which have played an important part 
in the history of the world. 

Victory of Defeat — Labor Loses. 

Much turns upon the question whether this 
theory is true or false. For if it is true that, 
whether his country is victorious or suffers 
defeat, the laborer necessarily incurs heavy loss 
and gains nothing at all, we are justified in 
lookin" upon the gathering force of the labor 
parties as a powerful factor making for uni- 
versal peace. In former times disastrous wars 
were sometimes fought over trifles; both par- 
ties to the conflict in the end laid down their 
arms exhausted by losses from which they re- 
covered only after generations. Such wars, it 
would seem, have been possible only in de- 
fault of an active political party opposed to 
war. If modern warfare is inevitably disastrous 
to the workingman, the labor parties of the 
several powers will furnish such a continuous 
organized criticism of policies likely to lead to 
hostilities that no group of international trou- 
ble-makers, however active, can seduce a na- 
tion into undertaking a serious war. 

In earlier times there have been, it is true, 
wars of sentiment and of principle, holy wars, 
race wars, wars of independence, conflicts of 
competing civilizations. Such wars we may 
have in the future also. In the case of wars 
of this character, calculations of cost and gain 
are beside the point. Racial existence, political 
freedom, immunity from religious oppression. 



are values to be won at any cost. There can be 
no question of distribution of tnese values 
among the several classes in society. Most wars, 
however, in all ages, have been fought over 
questions of material interests. Goods and 
lands, concessions and markets, have been the 
prizes of victory. These are measurable values, 
comparable with the costs of winning them. 
They are capable of distribution among the dif- 
ferent social classes. It is the contention of the 
labor theorists that these values are not as a 
fact impartially distributed; that the working 
class gets none of them. Our present task is 
to determine the validity of this contention. 

No extended study of history is required to 
prove that the doctrine of the profitlessness of 
war to the working class is not valid for all 
times. From a successful campaign the war- 
rior of antiquity returned well provided with 
slaves or loaded with booty. The inhabitants 
of a conquered state and all they possessed, 
chattels and land, were free prizes, and there is 
no reason for doubting that the common sol- 
dier — the working-class representative — shared in 
the distribution of such gains. War, to men 
born in poverty, was a trade, like husbandry or 
the handicrafts. It was fraught with greater 
risks than these, but its prizes were far more 
attractive. In the Middle Ages the looting of 
captured cities appears frequently to have en- 
riched common soldiers as well as ofiicers. The 
better share of the winnings fell naturally to 
the men of higher rank, but no military leader 
could have retained his popularity without grant- 
ing even the lowest class of his followers a 
share in the plunder. 

In comparatively recent times, also, the ma- 
terial gains from war have been shared by the 
common soldier and his class. In our own 
colonial period, for example, the backwoods- 
man fought the French and Indians partly for 
patriotic reasons, but partly also for the sake 
of the hunting grounds and rich valleys to the 
westward which should provide him and his 
children with homes and means of livelihood. 
The Texan heroes fought, no doubt, for Anglo- 
Saxondom and liberty; prospective "headrights" 
were, however, something also well worth fight- 
ing for. A square league of rich land, to be 
selected in the vast territory cleared of Mexi- 
cans — such was the prize that even a private 
soldier might win. 

New Concept of Private Property. 

Almost unnoticed, however, a profound change 
has taken place in the institutions regulating 
the conduct of wars. In the last two hundred 
years the concept of private property has under- 
gone a notable extension and intensification. 
The lands of the world which are fit for homes 
of men of the expanding races are almost all 
private property — the private property of civi- 
lized men. And gradually the idea has become 
fixed in the modern consciousness that such 
property is to be held inviolable, even through 
conquest. The clearing of a conquered prov- 
ince of its inhabitants, and the distribution of 
the land among the soldiers of the victorious 
army, is now unthinkable. Movable goods are 
still liable to seizure, under the laws of war; 



but on land they are not, in fact, seized with- 
out compensation, except in so far as they may 
be regarded as instrumentalities of war. When 
Germany wrested Alsace-Lorraine from France, 
the German soldier gained neither land nor 
loot. On the sea, since 1854, the enemy's goods 
under a neutral flag have been exempt from 
seizure; and the public opinion of the world is 
almost ripe for the establishment of the general 
principle that private property at sea must be 
held inviolate. 

There is only one way for a citizen of the 
conquering nation to secure land or chattels 
within the borders of a conquered province: to 
buy it. And this he could have done as well 
without the costs of conquest. For the same 
social process which established the inviolability 
of private property has erected into almost uni- 
versal law the freedom of migration and free- 
dom in the buying and selling of goods. Be- 
fore the Franco-Prussian war German citizens 
were privileged to migrate to Alsace-Lorraine 
and acquire property there; they have no greater 
privileges now. Capitalism, or the social order 
dominated by the property concept, has prac- 
tically removed struggles for land and goods 
from the field of international conflict. Under 
our existing economic system there is nothing 
to prevent a race from steadily extending its 
actual borders. The Irish are free to win back 
the whole soil of Ireland, if they can develop 
a superiority to English hindholders in indus- 
try, thrift, and perhaps craft. The Slavs may 
advance upon the Teutons unchecked by mili- 
tary force, provided that they are economically 
the better race. In the United States we ac- 
cept as a matter of course the supplanting of 
the original Anglo-Saxon population by Ger- 
mans, Slavs. Hungarians or Italians. All the 
prejudices created by wide differences in race 
and in culture are required to arouse us to 
action against the conquest of land by the 
process of infiltration of population. 

Indemnities Do Not Profit Workers. 

Public property is still subject to seizure by a 
conquering nation; but such property is seldom 
of a character to yield profit even to the state; 
it never yields rewards to the common soldier. 
Indemnities may be levied; and these, thereo- 
relically, may benefit the common soldier and 
his class througii relief of taxation. The bene- 
fits from indemnities, however, arc intangible, 
and it would be difficult to produce instances of 
men enlisting in the army for the purpose of 
securing them. 

There is no material interest of the working 
class that can be furthered by the conquest 
of a state in the same stage of civilization, 
but arc there not profits to be gained through 
the subjugation of states in a different cultural 
stage? The partition of Africa and the scramble 
for position in China indicate that statesmen 
believe that their respective nations have, as a 
whole, much to gain from the control of such 
.iiatcs. Has the working class, as such, any- 
thing to gain? 

The land in liie greater part of Asia, and in a 
considerable part of Africa, is already private 
property; native titles would hardly be dis- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



turbed upon the assumption of control by a 
colonizing power. The land not now occupied 
is desert or swamp or jungle, and is inacces- 
sible to members of the working class. The 
building of railways, the exploiting of forests 
and mines, offer valuable opportunities to some 
of the citizens of the ruling nation, but these 
are not members of the working class. The 
flotation of a company t" construct a railway 
in a Chinese province may yield large profits 
to its promoters. The enterprise may offer 
attractive investments to capitalists. The busi- 
ness class will be drawn upon to provide man- 
agers, the professional class to provide engi- 
neers. The road will be constructed, however, 
with native labor, and native labor, chiefly, will 
be employed in its operation. The services of 
the working clas.-- of the colonizing nation may 
perhaps be drawn upon for steel and other sup- 
plies. But it stands to lose through the drain- 
ing away of capital which would otherwise have 
financed a local venture. 

Such enterprises, if successful, establish m the 
imperial nation a class of persons who draw 
their incomes from the toil of half-enslaved 
colonials. It is such class that most accentu- 
ates the differences between the men who toil 
and the men who possess. The magnate with 
fortune securely invested in colonial railways 
or rubber or sugar is likely to be a convinced 
adherent of the doctrine that the employmg 
class is also the ruling class, whose determina- 
tions it is treason to oppose. Colonial exploita- 
tion, however much it may enrich certain mem- 
bers of the property-liolding class, can hardly 
fail to be a disadvantage, both material and 
moral, to the working class. 

The Control of Colonial Markets. 

Colonial dominion, it may be urged, carries 
with it the control of markets; and the work- 
ingman, as well as the capitalist, profits from 
an expanding market. The colonial market may 
even be an exceptionally profitable one; it is 
almost certain to be such if an exclusive com- 
mercial policy is pursued by the colonizing na- 
tion. The true measure of the value of a 
branch of trade to the working class is not, 
however, its lucrativeness. A better measure is 
its volume. It is of more importance to labor 
to export a hundred millions' worth of prod- 
ucts at an advance of ten per cent, than to 
export fifty millions at an advance of fifty per 
cent. The best measure of all is the amount 
of wages represented by the goods exported; 
and this amount is likely to be in inverse ratio 
to the lucrativeness of a branch of trade. Our 
export of wheat to England is very lucrative; 
for every dollar we receive from it, about sev- 
inty-five cents has been paid out in wages to 
the laborers employed in producing and trans- 
porting the wheat. Our export of cigarettes 
to a Chinese province — if we possessed one — 
would probably be very lucrative; of every 
dollar received seventy-five cents would repre- 
sent rent, good-will, business profits and other 
property income. But our workmen are in- 
terested in exporting, not good-will, but labt'r 
■'embodied" in goods and paid for. It is there- 
fore not the closed colonial market, where mon- 
opoly profits are to be secured, that is most ad- 
vantageous to the workingman, but the great, 
open markets of the world where business is 
conducted on small margins of profit. A work- 
ing-class commercial policy would concentrate 
its action upon the latter field, and would look 
askance at any tendency in the direction of 
diverting the national capital and enterprise to 
the former field. 

It is not to be denied that some gain may ac- 
crue to the laborer from the colonial market, 
provided that it can be secured w-ithout injury 
to the larger and more advantageous open trade. 
If even twenty-five per cent, of the price of 
cigarettes for China represents the wages of 
labor, this is in itself a gain to the working 
class. But the nation that sets about to de- 
velop a closed market is almost certain to neg- 
lect the open markets, if not to place barriers 
in the way of those who wish to resort to them. 
All through the eighteenth century the inter- 
change of goods between France and England 
was practically prohibited, largely as a result 
of jealousies originating in the colonial trade. 
VV'e have no reason to question the justice of 
Adam Smith's observation that freedom of 
trade would have been of inestimable advan- 
tage to both nations. It certainly would have 
been worth more to the workingmen of both 
countries than the colonial trade to which it 
was sacrificed. 

Pre-occupation with a closed colonial market 
is at best a source of ineiTiciency in a nation's 
commercial policy. Almost inevitably the ex- 
clusion of other nations from a given coun- 
try's colonial possessions leads to retaliation, 
and the retaliatory policy never confines itself to 
colonial affairs. We may exclude Japan from 
the Philippines by heavy tariffs; Japan may 
exclude us from Korea and Southern Manchuria 
by similar means. The matter does not end 
here; ultimately the direct trade between the 
United States and Japan, whicli is far more 
important to labor than the Philippine or the 
Korean trade, is impeded by restrictive legis- 
lation. On the whole it is doubtful whether a 
closed colonial trade is ever worth so much to 
labor as it costs, in terms of open trade alone. 
If it is necessary to subjugate the colony by 
arms, the necessity is excessively paid for twice 
over. And if finally the colony must be de- 
fended in a w'ar against a great pow'er, the 



price labor pays for the share in the venture 
becomes colossal in its extravagance. 

Modern warfare offers no increase of wealth 
to the members of the working clas>; the ac- 
quisition of markets through war is of no value 
to the workingman. This fact does not, how- 
ever, preclude the possibility that war may offer 
a powerful appeal to the working class, and thus 
command its political support. In past w-ars 
there have been brilliant prizes for the brave 
and fortunate. After the Civil War almost 
every community. North or South, had its in- 
stances of men who had fought their way up 
from the ranks to titles of great popular esteem. 
The war had bestow-ed upon them distinction 
through life, such as they could never have 
gained in times of peace. A brigadier-general- 
ship won by a man of the people was a stimulus 
to thousands. It is beside the point to say that 
the prize was not worth the cost incurred by 
all those who sought it. Actuarial computa- 
tions of gains and costs have never governed 
the actions of masses of men. and probably 
never will. So long as war remained a lottery, 
offering splendid prizes to some, the mere fact 
that its blanks were disproportionately numer- 
ous was not sufficient to check the spread of 
war sentiment. 

War, however, becoines less and less of a 
lottery with every advance in its technique. The 
training needed by a general today is highly 
specialized. That it may be acquired by a man 
from the ranks in the brief and sanguinary cam- 
paigns that characterize twentieth-century war- 
fare is possible, indeed, but only in rare in- 
stances. The European nations which prepare 
seriously for war provide themselves w-itli 
trained and competent officers for every emer- 
gency. It is these officers, men from the upper 
and middle classes, who will gain whatever dis- 
tinction a war may offer. The man who enters 
the army as a private, at the beginning of a 
war, will remain a private to the end of the 
war. The working-class soldier w'ho rises to a 
position of high command is destined eventually 
to take his place alongside of the mythical 
wandering youth, elevated by freak of fortune 
to a kin.gship. 

The Lure of Promotion. 

Promotion, however, is only a part of the ro- 
mance of war which lures men of the working 
class to the colors. Adventure, new scenes, new 
experiences, how' much these have meant to 
the young men of restless disposition to whom 
the environment in which they have been bred 
.■:eems tame and tedious! Such were the youths 
who used to run away to sea, or to swear 
additional years upon themselves in order to be 
accepted as soldiers. They were once numerous 
enough to form large armies, and the bellicose 
statesman could always count upon them as 
eager to fight in any cause. They seem not so 
much in evidence now; at any rate, we have 
elifficulty in recruiting men enough even for our 
small army, and our navy is never too fully 
manned. There is a consensus of opinion among 
those who urge political measures for the re- 
habilitation of our merchant shipping that spe- 
cial inducements will be needed to tempt men 
to enter the sailor's life. And the British 
mercantile marine is remarkably dependent upon 
Lascars and other foreign sailors. 

What has become of the adventurous youth 
of earlier generations? They are largely on the 
railroad, which sends its spurs into every val- 
ley, offering a ready means of escape to the 
young man who finds the rural quiet intolerable. 
Or they are in some one of the wandering 
occupations which have developed to such ex- 
traordinary proportions in these days of ex- 
panding trade relations. It is no longer neces- 
sary to go to war in order to see the world or 
to experience life. 

And as civil life becomes richer in variety and 
in romance, w-ar becomes poorer. The military 
campaign of to-day does not consist, as for- 
merly, of long marches over a strange terri- 
tory, leisurely sieges, interminable garrisoning 
of captured cities. The modern campaign is 
short and sharp; the armies are hurried on fast 
trains, to battle, like cattle to the abattoir. The 
private soldier's game of life and death is 
played quickly to its end, and he returns half- 
dazed to his home, or returns no more. War- 
fare is becoming mechanical, like a large-scale 
industry. Its chief distinction is its appalling 
accident rate. Accident? How? Does death 
on the battlefield, nowadays, differ from death 
in a mine explosion or a railwav collision? 
Bulgars and Turks may still strive with bayonets 
and sabres; but Germans and French would 
meet death unromantically, at long range. 

Like material gain, glory and adventure are 
rapidly withdrawing themselves from the reach 
of the common soldier, if they are not already 
unattainable. Their tradition remains, however, 
not without potency. In reality men who en- 
list may be destined to be mowed down inglori- 
ously by machine guns; but among the motives 
which appeal to the imagination of the recruit 
are atavistic yearnings for the excitement of 
the hand-to-hand conflict. The Scottish fight- 
ing tradition is still alive, although two cen- 
turies have passed since Scot and Saxon were 
reconciled, and since the Lowland kine that 
were once the spoil of the Scottish clansmen 
came to be vested with the sanctity of "capita- 
listic" private property. The war-like tradition, 
however, cannot forever survive the reality of 
the personal prize. The statesman of to-day 
wisely bases his hopes of military predominance 



upon universal service. The conscript must 
serve the purposes of national aggrandizement, 
since volunteering cannot be relied upon to 
provide sufficient men for a great war. And 
with conscription official recognition is given 
to the fact that war is no longer worth while, 
from the point of view of the class that fur- 
nishes the private soldiers — the working class. 

While the gains from war to members of 
the working class are dwindling to the vanish- 
ing point, the costs of war to be borne by labor 
grow steadily heavier; so at least it is often 
asserted. If by the costs of war merely the 
losses and suffering in the field are meant, the 
assertion is probably not true. The campaigns 
of the future, to judge from the results of the 
Ru>-so-Japanese and the Balkan wars, will be 
more sanguinary than the campaigns of the 
past, but war will be less protracted. We shall 
liave no future Seven Years' War, much less a 
Hundred Years' War. Furthermore, if a greater 
number of soldiers die in battle than formerly, 
fewer die from disease. It is also to be borne 
in mind that losses in battle are distributed 
more impartially than formerly among all 
classes; mortality among officers in the Boer 
and Russo-Japanese wars was at least as heavy 
as mortality among the common soldiers. 
Workers Must Pay Costs of War. 

Hut the costs of war do not rest exclusively 
upon the soldiers at the front. The working 
population at home has to bear the burden of 
war-taxes, the hardships attendant upon com- 
mercial and industrial disturbances, and the loss 
of the services of many of its most productive 
members. These costs, it would appear, are 
growing heavier. That this is true of the finan- 
cial burden of war is matter of common knowl- 
edge. That it is true of the other incidents of 
war also follows naturally from the fact that 
tile modern state is coming to be prevailingly 
urban. An urban state is less fitted than a 
rural state to bear the strain of war. 

One hundred years ago only 45 per cent, 
of the population of England, already a highly 
developed industrial country, was found in cities 
and towns. To-day the urban population forms 
a higher percentage than this in Germany 
(.S4), and in the United States (46.3). In 
France the percentage is only slightly less (41). 
in Ivngland to-day 71 per cent, of the popula- 
tion is city-uwelling. 

As a consequence of the concentration of 
population in the cities the economic life of a 
nation has come to be very delicately balanced. 
Food, fuel, and materials must be supplied to 
the cities with the utmost regularity; the prod- 
ucts of the city must find an unobstructed out- 
let; otherwise a crisis is inevitable, with its 
attendant unemployment and distress. Even 
were a nation practically self-sufficing, it could 
hardly engage in a great war without a serious 
disturbance of its economic balance. 

Few modern states, however, are self-sufficing. 
The United States is perhaps less dependent 
upon forei.gn supplies and foreign markets than 
any other great power. Yet half a million men 
in the United States earn their living in the 
production of goods for Great Britain alone. 
.•\ war with Great Britain would force all these 
men to seek new fields of employment. A con- 
siderable period of time would elapse before 
the readjustment of industry could be com- 
pleted. During the process, our whole economic 
organism w<iuld be seriously disturbed in its 
functioning. 

The city-dwellers, as we have seen, already 
represent a very large percentage of the popu- 
lation of the modern state, and this percentage 
is everywhere increasing. If w'e confine our 
attention to men of military age, we can see at 
once that the percentage of this class found 
in the cities must be even greater. Young 
men, and men in the prime of life, flow steadily 
to the city; the aged and the very young re- 
main in the countrj'. Accordingly, the great 
war of the future, if such a war ever occurs, 
will be fought largely by city industrial work- 
ers, draw'n to the standards under some form 
of universal military service law. Not merely 
those who are without dependents, but those 
who have wives and children, parents and sis- 
ters, relying upon them for support, will be re- 
(juired for national defense. 

It has been just as true in the past that a 
great war has required the enrollment of those 
who had families dependent upon them. When 
the head of a rural household, however, enlists 
in the army, he leaves his familj' with a roof 
of their own for shelter and with cleared fields 
which will afford means of subsistence, although 
the labor of tillage may fall heavily upon them. 
The industrial worker possesses, as a rule, 
neither roof nor means of production. \\'hen 
he is drafted into military service his wife and 
children must fall back upon employment in 
the factory or the sweatshop. And such em- 
ployment is not to be secured with certainty, 
especially if war is attended, as is almost in- 
evitably the case, by commercial disturbances. 

It is doubtful whether, in the whole history 
of the world, the secondary hardships of war 
ever rested so heavily upon any class as the.v 
would rest upon the industrial w-orking class of 
the present day. The industrial workers live 
from hand to mouth; war strikes off the hand. 
Yet, there are persons who would have us be- 
lieve that working-class anti-militarism is 
merely a surface phenomenon, which would 
disappear with the first call to arms. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



s. 



^'*'^*'*^ 



"^^ ^ -^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Will Bar Strike-Breakers. 

President Wilson has dealt the Colorado 
mine operators a hard blow by an order 
that provides : 

First — Miners must not be gathered and 
lirought in by operators. 

Second — Miners must seek work at the 
mines, and must not be solicited or im- 
pressed into service. 

Third — Miners must be residents of 
Colorado. 

Fourth — Miners must comply with the 
laws of Colorado regarding" the mining of 
coal. 

This order ends the practice of import- 
ing strike-breakers to the struck mines in 
small groups, as they must henceforth ap- 
l;ly at the mines, must be residents of the 
State and must not violate any of the 
State's mining laws. The order hits em- 
ployment agencies, and these institutions 
have been notified by the Colorado State 
i^abor Department that any violation of 
the rule that "miners must seek work" at 
tiie coal mines in the strike district will be 
])rosecuted. 

Commenting on this order, the United 
Labor Bulletin of Denver says: 

"An awful lamentation is going up from, 
the Colorado coal operators over a recent 
order from Washington against employ- 
ment of strike-breakers in the struck coal 
fields of the State. Government control 
and operation of the mines is indicated in 
the latest step taken by President \\^ilson 
unless the mine owners agree to some 
method of adjusting the industrial trouble 
which began on September 23, 1913. The 
administration at Washington is growing 
weary of furnishing 2000 Federal troops 
to do police duty for the State, made nec- 
essary by arbitrary tactics of the Rocke- 
feller mine managers. 

"Frantic appeals have been made this 
week by the struck operators to President 
Wilson and Secretary of War Garrison 
to rescind or at least modify the order, 
but in vain. Officials at Washington are 
standing pat and declare their intention of 
forcing the operators to grant living, hu- 
mane conditions for the miners and com- 
pliance with the mining laws of the State." 

Officers of the mine workers are cpioted 
as "well pleased with the new turn of 
affairs, and see in its enforcement b_\- tlic 
Federal troops a way to bring about a 
speedy settlement of the strike." \\ ith 
the State's output of coal ])ractically re- 
duced to nothing, they claim, the o])erators 
will be forced to allow an arbitration 
board to decide the merits of the strikers' 
grievances. 

Refusals of the operators to arbitrate 
the strike issue and com])laints that the 
Federal troops had been allowing strikc- 
l)reakers to go to work in the mines were 
the reasons assigned by mine workers' 
officials for the order. 

Secretary of War Garrison has tele- 
graphed E. M. Snyder, international rep- 
resentative of the mine workers, at Aguilar, 
that: "I have communicated with all of 
the commanders advising them that here- 
after orders shall be carried out as follows, 
with respect to those mines which are run- 



ning." The Federal official then enumer- 
ates the conditions, which are printed 
above. 



Immigration Figures. 

Statistics issued by the United States De- 
partment of Labor show that 71,723 immi- 
grant aliens and 13,366 non-immigrant 
aliens were admitted to this country dur- 
ing the month of June, this year. These 
figures have been the lowest since February, 
when immigrant aliens to the number of 
46,873 were admitted. The grand total of 
aliens admitted during the eight months 
from November to June is 683,669, or an 
average of 85,4.i8 per month. The number 
of non-alien immigrants admitted during 
this period is 112.400, or an average of 14,- 
0.^0 ])er month. 

The June rejiort maintains the high aver- 
age of unskilled labor that crowds .Ameri- 
can cities and industrial centers. ( )f the 
t( tal number admitted — 71,728 — the num- 
])er of women, children, and those giving no 
occujiation, totaled 22,.S95. Of the remain- 
ing 36,C)').^, 11,882 were classified as farm 
laborers, 10,.=i00 as laborers, and 10,887 as 
servants, with only 700 as farmers and 108 
as gardeners. 



Can't Stay the Inevitable. 

"The world is recognizing organized la- 
bor, and there is no use to attempt to fight 
the judgment of civilization," was the un- 
qualified declaration by Ihiited States Sen- 
ator Chilton of \\'est Virginia while dis- 
cu.ssing the labor sections of the Clavton 
bill. 

'Hie Senator said, in ])art : "Hide it as 
may be done, it is nevertheless true that 
there is a feeling among laborers and the 
|)eoiilc generally that their Government is 
not near enough to them. They want to 
particijjate more in e\'erythiiig that con- 
cerns their Government. This demand will 
soon be granted in every State. The Fed- 
eral injunction is looked upon with a great 
deal of disfavor. Right or wrong, this fact 
must be kept in mind. No injunction can 
settle a labor dis])ute when it assumes pro- 
]:)ortions such as those conflicts which have 
recently threatened industry. There is no 
way to change man's nature by laws, in- 
junctions, or arrests. Tlic world is recog- 
nizing organized labor, ;iiul there is no use 
to attcni|)t to fight the judgment of civil- 
ization. We must deal with this subject 
as it is, and there is no power that can 
take from its consideration the fact that 
millions of men are organized, and that 
the (|iiestion of women and children and 
the demands of every ])rom])ting of hu- 
manity will enter into its solution. 1 want 
to sec these industrial wars come lo an 
end. I am not afraid to say that 1 wani 
labor to have a fair share of the income of 
industry. 

"'i'liis country must look for relief for 
him from that desolation which finds him 
in his old age without means and without 
strength to work. The first thing to do is 
to treat labor as a human agency and not 
as a commodity. Whether the laborer 
(Continued on Pajre 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated witii the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg.. Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus. Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall. West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland BIdgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristrania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Kobcn- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratf)ri del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oestcrreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle ingia- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
I'cdcration Obrera Mariliina (Sailors and I'"ire- 
mcn). Buenos Aires, Olavarria 36.3 (.Mtos). 
BRAZIL. 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Fcli.x 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

-Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo dc Sao 
Doniingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Empregados em Caniara, 
Rua dos Bcncdictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 
.\nial;j;amalc(l Society of -South African .Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



Owing to the war and r.ther things 
there are said to be close on 6000 
miners unemployed in the Newcastle 
and Maitland districts in N'ew South 
Wales. 

The Brisbane Worker thinks that 
a striking exercise of patriotic self- 
denial is shown in the general con- 
sensus of "public" refusal to touch, 
taste, or handle German lager in 
bulk, bottle or pewter. 

The trade union membership in 
Great Britain for 1913 constituted a 
record. The total number of mem- 
bers reached 3,993,769, an increase or 
21^/2 per cent. The membership in 
practically all unions increased, but 
principally in the transport workers 
and laborers' unions. 

The Australian Commonwealth 
Statistician has just issued a special 
bulletin dealing with cost of living. 
Referring to similar investigation 
carried out in 1910-11, the statistician 
shows that the wage-earner with an 
income of £3 16s. 8d. per week was 
in November last spending £3 13s. 
6d. as against £3 19s. Sd. expendi- 
ture on an income of £4 13s. Id. in 
the earlier year, the percentage of 
expenditure on food having increased 
from 29.30 in 1910-11 to 41.16 in 1913. 

During the year past the French 
Department of I-abor gathered sta- 
tistics relating to the strikes waged 
in the various countries during the 
years 1911 and 1912. Tt is shown 
that Denmark heads the list in suc- 
cesses with 49 per cent, and 28.5 
compromised. Great Britain is low- 
est in the list, the completely suc- 
cessful strikes being only 6.6 per 
cent. However, the figures also re- 
veal the fact that in Denmark only 
about 33,000 workers went on strike 
in the two years, while the number 
in Great Britain was over 2,100,000. 
Opinions are to-day very divided 
as to the advantages or disadvantages 
to be derived from a minimum wage, 
the one predicting perennial happi- 
ness upon its introduction, the other, 
calamity. In spite of all that politi- 
cal economists might say to the con- 
trary, the legal minimum established 
in the chain industry under the Eng- 
lish Trades Boards Act, 1909, has 
proved itself to be an unqualified 
success. The chain trade is divided 
into two sections. One is called the 
factory and the other the outwork. 
In the outwork section the inevitable 
middleman plays his part, and many 
people are of the opinion that it is 
attributable to him that wages are 
so terribly low. Before the opera- 
tion of the Trades Boards Act, hun- 
dreds of men worked as many as 60 
and 70 hours per week for 12s. to 
18s., whilst women and girls could 
not possibly earn more than Ss. or 
6s. for the same number of hours. 
And this in a trade where the physi- 
cal energy — to be exerted before a 
blazing furnace — was so enormous. 
The Chain Trade Board meets as 
often as occasion requires to fix rates 
of wages or discuss any regulation 
or complaint which is considered to 
be of vita! importance to the indus- 
try. A minimum time-rate of 2vid. 
an hour or lis. 3d. for a 54 hour 
week has been fixed, and minimum 
piece rates based on the time rate 
to yield at least lis. 3d. in the case 
of female workers. In the case of 
male workers a minimum rate of 
£1 for a 48 hour week (Sd. an hour) 
on the smaller sizes of chain, rising 
up to a minimum rate of 30s. on the 
larger sizes. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



San Pedro Letter List. 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



m. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 
EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

■437 PROIST STREET 8AIV PEDRO 



CLOTHES SATISFACTION 



IS THE RESULT WHEN YOU CONSULT 

S. G. SWANSON 

For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postofflce 
Established 1904 at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Kupfer, born February 9, 
1890, at Coburg, Germany, is in- 
quired for by the German Consulate, 
201 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johannes Puun, born in Oesel, 
.^rensburg, Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 84 Embarcadero, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

$10.00 reward will be paid by 
Johnson & Higgins, 244 California 
street, for information locating John 
Anderson and George T. Nelson, 
who were members of the crew of 
the steamship "Asuncion" in Octo- 
ber, 1908. 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister. Miss Lucy Wood, 108 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Anybody knowing the where- 
abouts of Arne Johnsen please 
notify O. M. Johnsen, Mosby, 
Christiand S., Norway. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship "Candida" at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

Fritjof Ellingsen, age 32, a native 
of Drammen, Norway, he was short, 
heavy set, dark hair, parted in the 
center, and good looking. Anybody 
knowing his whereabouts please noti- 
fy Ed Knach, 171 Clipper street, city. 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



Anijprsen, A. -1645 
Anrlersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Martin 
Anderson, Axel 
Andersson, E. -1762 
Anderson, H. -1883 
A.. Mr. -1504 
Andersen, Edward 
Anderson, Gust 
Alin, Emil 
Anderson, David C. 
Bensen, Severin 
Berndt, Hugo 
Bringsrud, Marald 
Berg. S. 
Brogard, N. 
Bergqvist, Wm. 
Boy, A. 
Clrul. M. 
Christensen, A. 

-1095 
Cotter, J. 
Carlson, Kalle 
Ceelan, John 
Clausen, J. 
Chilton, Harry 
Caddel, Adolf 
Carlson, Carl 
Dreger, .Tack 
Essen. Carl 
Elllngson, Ivar 
Fasholz, Dan 
Folvik, Lewis 
Grigoleit. E. 
Gunther. Dirk 
Gustafson. Alf 
Gusek, B. 
Gronlund. Oskar 
Holmborg. Frank 
Hansen, Marius 
Holm. Arthur 
Hansen, H. T. -1446 
Hansen, .Johannes 
Hakonsen. P. O. 
Haro, Aarp 
Harrold. Henry 
Hermanson. Fritz 
Johansen, Ed. -2240 
.Tohansen. Emil 
Johansson, N. A. 

-280 
Jensen, Oscar M. 
Johnson, John A. 
Jorgensen, H. P. 
Johnsen, George 
Karlson, Richard 



Kremer, Sigurd 
Kalnamm, Andvey 
Kolodzie. George 
Kristlanscn. Nils 
Karstin, Hugo 
Leideker, E. 
Lang, Chas. 
Lindner, J. -1750 
Lundberg, T. 
Lyngard, Jorgen 
Mesak, E. 
Mikalsen. Andreas 
Martinelli. Walter 
Mennlcke, Fritz 
Miller, Wra. 
Mayers, P. M. 
Michaelsen, A. -1105 
Morris, M. H. 
Matlson, J. -1320 
Maklnan, K. 
Nllson, Edon. C. 
Olsen, A. O. -759 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Ole Wilhelm 
Osterberg, S. H. 

-1284 
Olsen. O. Marthin 
Paader, Hugo 
Paulson, Gustaf 
Perez, Antonio 
Plant, Billle 
Peterson, C. E. 
Rutel. Ernest 
Robbins, Jack 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Svensen, Nick 
Svendsen, S. -1717 
Steen, J. C. 
Sandy. Oskar 
Samuelsen, Victor 
Schultz, Albert 
Schultz, Axel 
Sanseter, Paul 
Schmidt, George 
Schager, E. 
Svenningsen. S. N. 
Schultz, Robert 
Tell, Olaf 
Tvedt. Olaf 
Thomas, Joseph W. 
Vohs, Heinrlch 
Wagner, Billy 
Zimmer, Walter 

Packages. 
Johansen, Nils A. 



-903 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, Anton 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Edvard 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Gusz, Henry 
Hansen, Eugen 
Hansen, Jens 
Jorgensen, C. M. 



Johanson, John -880 
Kosklnen, Suttro 
More, Walter 
Silver. Salin E. 
Ivertsen, Sigvald B. 
Speokman. Mae 
Tomkin, Frank 



A SAILOR'S BANK 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-FARING MEN 

— in the — 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to al! its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the bu.siness of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish. Norwegian and Danish 3Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSOX. Manager 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 
which is entirely different from the 
mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



ALEX. KANE C. A. BRUCE 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 



CIGARS, TOBACCO, SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Bellenot, who last sailed on 
the S. S. "Mariposa" out of Seattle, 
Wash., about November, 1912, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Mrs. Bel- 
lenot, 1406 Second street. West 
Berkeley, Cal. Anyone knowing of 
him kindly write at the above ad- 
dress. — 6-24-14. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. .Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the 
mother, Fru Thorin, Hegagata 7. 
Goteborg, Sweden. 9-2.1-14 



"— ™^- 



-"^ " 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The steamer "Isthmian" recently loaded at 
Seattle part cargo of 500 tons of spruce wood 
pulp from British Columbia for New York. 
This is the first pulp shipment from British Co- 
lumbia to the Atlantic coast and is expected to 
be the forerunner of many more. 

The Standard Oil Company has taken the 
initial steps toward constructing a large ship- 
repairing plant at Richmond, Cal. A plant 
for making minor repairs is already in opera- 
tion. This, it is said, will be increased so that 
all the major repairs will be made there. 

It is reported that the Japanese Government 
has taken over many passenger and freight 
steamers for the transport service. The Toyo 
Kisen Kaisha alone has given up five big steam- 
ers for Government service. All the vessels 
taken over were hurried to Sasebo and Kure 
for orders and suoplies. 

Federal Judge Neterer in a decision rendered 
at Seattle established the judicial rule respecting 
admiralty cases that ninety days shall be the 
limit of priority for claims filed in libel actions. 
The decision was given in connection with a 
ruling in the libel of the Heffernan Drydock 
Company against the steamship "Edith." 

Bids will be opened early in October for the 
construction of another lighthouse tender for 
the Portland district, which will be christened 
the "Rose." The new craft is to be about the 
same size as the "Fern" and of the type of a 
steam schooner. Slie will be something like 
125 ft. long, 25 ft. beam and 7 or 8 ft. draft. 

When the Exposition traffic develops it is un- 
derstood that the Pacific Navigation Company's 
liners will connect here with the magnificent 
Hill liners "Great Northern" and "North Pa- 
cific," which will ply between San Francisco 
and Astoria. As these vessels are twenty-two- 
knot boats, they will be able to compete with 
the railroads for time. 

Two ofifshore lumber fixtures are announced 
in the weekly freight circular of the Shipown- 
ers' Association of the Pacific Coast. They are 
the schooner "Ethel Zane," from Puget Sound 
to Guayaquil, and the schooner "H. D. Benedix- 
sen," Puget Sound to New Plymouth, both on 
private terms. Coastwise lumber rates are fluc- 
tuating, according to the circular. 

Officials of the Great Northern Steamship 
Company at Seattle announced the next sailing 
of its giant liner "Minnesota" has been "in- 
definitely postponed." This is taken to mean 
she will be withdrawn from transpacific trade. 
Rumors have been current here for some time 
that the "Minnesota" is to be sold. It is be- 
lieved she will be transferred to the Atlantic to 
ply out of New York. The "Minnesota" is 
owned by the Great Northern Railway, and a 
special dispensation from Congress will be 
necessary for her to use the Panama Canal. 

It was reported that the new Northern and 
Southern Steamship Company paid the Kosmos 
Steamship Company the sum of $135,000 for 
the German freighter "Alexandria," which has 
been laid up in San Francisco Bay since the 
outbreak of the European war. Despite the 
fact that British Consul A. Carnegie Ross is 
emphatic in his statement that the vessel's 
change to American register will not prevent 
her from being seized as a war prize, the own- 
ers state that she will shortly steam for Val- 
paraiso with a general cargo of merchandise, 
coal and lumber. The vessel has been rechris- 
tened "Sacramento," and will carry American 
officers and an American crew. The complica- 
tions which might result should she be seized 
on the high seas were the subject of no little 
discussion in local shipping circles. 

No additional information has been received 
to indicate the exact number of those who 
lost their lives when the steam schooner "Fran- 
cis H. Leggett" went down in a gale ofif the 
Oregon coast. Although the ship's list left on 
shore shows that the passengers and crew num- 
bered sixty-one, it is known that there were 
additional passengers on board, making the total 
seventy or more, of which only two were res- 
cued. Several bodies have been recovered so 
far and vessels are on the lookout for bodies in 
the vicinity of the wreck. Captain Moriyama of 
the Japanese cruiser "Idzumo," which picked up 
the "Leggett's" S. O. S, call and informed other 
vessels in the vicinity, sent the following 
wireless to the Portland office of Charles R. 
McCormick & Company, agents of the "Leg- 
gett": "Very sympathetic condolences for the 
sad disaster which resulted in the loss of the 
'Leggett' and its many victims. Very sorry we 
could not reach scene of disaster in time on 
account of great distance. Captain Moriyama, 
'Idzumo.'" 

Seventy members of the Chinese crews of 
the German refugee steamers "Loongmoon," 
"Staatssekretar, "Kraetke" and "Gouverneur 
Jaeschke," of the Hamburg-.'Kmerican line, were 
imprisoned at Honolulu on mutiny charges made 
by the captains of the vessels. Jail accommoda- 
tions already are taxed by the number of Ori- 
entals under arrest, but the captains of the 
German steamers say they fear further trouble 



from the 150 Chinese still aboard their ships. 
The crews' version of the trouble, as related by 
the Chinese Consul, is that the alleged muti- 
neers were taken from Chinese waters on a 
promise that they would be returned in a week, 
but that they were taken to the Marshall Islands 
instead, and forced to work day and night, 
coaling three German cruisers. They were then 
brought to Honolulu, they told the Consul, and 
given to understand that their stay aboard ship 
in this port would be indefinite. The three 
Hamburg-American liners on which the trouble 
occurred are comparatively small vessels, which 
ran in here to avoid the probability of capture. 

The Swedish motor ship "Kron Prinz Gustaf 
Adolph," the second of her kind to make the 
passage across the Atlantic and through the 
Straits of Magellan to this port, passed in 
through the Golden Gate on September 24. 
The first Diesel-propelled vessel to arrive here 
was the Danish ship Siam, and the perform- 
ance of the Kron Prinz Gustaf Adolph was 
even more .satisfactory than that of the former 
vessel, demonstrating the practicability of this 
type of vessel. The vessel, which stopped en 
route at San Diego and San Pedro, left Gothen- 
berg ninety-eight days ago, and Captain Lewen- 
hagen reports a pleasant and uneventful voy- 
age, despite the fact that exceedingly rough 
weather was encountered on entering Magellan. 
The cargo of the "Kron Prinz Gustaf Adolph" 
consists of coke, pig iron and miscellaneous 
merchandise, and amounted to approximately 
6,000 tons when she left Europe. Of this, 2,000 
tons were discharged in each of the Southern 
California ports, the balance to be discharged 
here. W. R. Grace & Company, local agents 
for the Swedish owners of the vessel, will turn 
her over to George W. McNear & Company 
immediately upon the completion of unloading, 
and she will proceed to Port Costa to load 
grain for Great Britain. 

Steam schooner owners are taking advantage 
of the opening of the Panama Canal, as shown 
by the fact that several of the firms operating 
this class of vessel have already dispatched 
cargoes of lumber and merchandise direct from 
the Pacific Coast to the East, and others are 
preparing to follow their example within a short 
time. The latest firm to announce the steam- 
ing of one of its vessels for the East Coast via 
the new waterway is the E. J. Dodge Company 
of this city, which will send its steamer "St. 
Helens" to New York with a cargo of lumber 
and miscellaneous merchandise. The date for 
the steaming of the "St. Helens" has not been 
formally announced, but it is expected that she 
will get away from this port during the week. 
Following the "St. Helens,", it has been an- 
nounced that the steam schooner "Cricket," 
belonging to Fred Lindermann, will load lumber 
in the north and then proceed to this port to 
take on the balance of her cargo for New York, 
which will be similar to that of the former 
vessel. The "Cricket" is a new vessel, having 
been completed last spring by the United En- 
gineering Works, and is of the finest type of 
construction, having a lumber carrying capacity 
of 1,400,000 feet. Arrangements for the booking 
of the vessel's merchandise cargo are now being 
made. 

In a circular to the shipping world, the Pa- 
cific Mail Steamship Company announces that 
it has suspended its service between San Fran- 
cisco and New York, via Panama, which has 
been in vogue for over half a century. The 
last steamers on which freight was accepted 
were the ".'\ztec," from this port September 17, 
and the "Ancon," which steamed from New 
York on September 10. While the Pacific Mail 
has withdrawn from the coast-to-coast field, the 
service between the Golden Gate and the west 
coast ports of Mexico, Central America and 
South America will be continued and sustain the 
following routes: Between Pacific ports of 
Mexico and Central America and Caribbean sea 
and West India ports; between Pacific ports of 
Mexico and Central America and Gulf and At- 
lantic ports of Mexico and the United States; 
between Pacific ports of Mexico and Central 
America and all European ports; between Mexi- 
can and Central American ports and all ports on 
the west coast of South America, also Panama. 
A dash of sentiment is included in the circular, 
which is signed by Freight Traffic Manager Fred 
F. Connor, and approved by R. P. Schwerin, 
vice-president and general manager. "We re- 
gret," it mournfully reads, "to advise you that 
after sixty odd years, during which this com- 
pany has handled traffic between San Francisco 
and New York, via Panama, the mandatory pro- 
vision of the Panama Canal act does not per- 
mit us to continue our service or move freight 
between the Pacific and Atlantic ports of the 
United States." 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
570 We.st Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St 
NORFOLK, Va.. 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS. La.. 117 Decatur St 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE. Ala., 101 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 227 Sansom St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF, 

Headquarters (temporary); 

BOSTON, Mass.. IVaA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK. 51 South St. and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE. Md., 802-804 S. Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 214 West St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA .HARBOR, O., 21 High St 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 133 Clinton St 
N. TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day SL 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1185 W. Eleventh St 
CHICAGO. HI., 445 La Salle Ave 
DETROIT. Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., LSI Reed St 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 West Ninth SL 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Midi., 7 East Woodbrldge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Dav St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 I.sabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C. 518 Yates St. 

VANCOUVER. B C, 21.'? Hasting St., E. corner of 
Hasting and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 84 .Seneca St.. P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box «. 

T'ORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., Box 2100 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

.S.\N PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all rommunications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoflice as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Corrmiunicatlons from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 30. 1914. 



IXSIDIOL'S ( ?) METHODS. 



A Xew York sliipping journal i.s greatly 
alarmed because the crews of foreign vessels 
recently transferred to .\merican register have 
demanded and in most cases secured increases 
in wages. 

Says our worried contcniporary : 

Having failed in their attempt to compel ves- 
sels naturalized under the terms of the Act of 
Congress of August 18, 1914, to carry officers 
and engineers possessing- American licenses, the 
various labor organizations have gone about 
seeking to accomplish their purpose through 
more insidious tactics, which have resulted in 
nullifying to a great extent the liberal spirit of 
the statute. As soon as the American flag was 
hoisted over some of the foreign steamers reg- 
istered during the past week, demands for in- 
creases of pay were made by the men, officers 
and engineers at the instigation of the various 
unions. 

It is evident that tlie wise men who 
planned to build up an American Merchant 
Marine by susjiending our Xavigation laws 
have failed to take into consideration the 
fact that foreign seamen are not likely to be 
satisfied with foreign wages when their ves- 
sel becomes Americanized. Eoreign officers 
and sailors and firemen and cooks have their 
unions, and most of them need no coaxing 
when they see an opjiortunity to improve 
their generally miserable conditions and gain 
an increase over starvation wages. No "in- 
stigation" is required in cases of this kind, 
and it is positively ridiculous for the ship- 
owners' organ to talk aljout the "insidious" 
methods of labor organizations. If there is 
anything more insidious than the tactics of 
tlie clique whicli induced President Wilson 
to suspend certain sections of the Navigation 
laws, we should like to know about it. 

Perhaps it is expecting too much to have 
an official advocate of the shipping interests 
dwell upon any other point of view than tlic 
one that has placed a halo of $ signs around 
the American flag. P>ut the average mind 
will have no difficulty in grasping men's mo- 
tives who expect and insist upon improved 
conditions when the Stars and Stripes are 
hoisted in place of the Piritish Union Jack, 
the German black, wliite and red. or any 



other foreign flag. There are still among 
us men and women and children who believe 
that the .American flag stands for some things 
lliat cannot be measured or expressed in 
DoUars and Cents. Our public schools still 
teach the rising generation to honor and re- 
sjject ( )ld (dory, not because it is pretty to 
look at. but because it stands for something. 
And that something is the very opposite of 
low wages and exploitation. 

But of what use is sentiment in connec- 
tion with a commercialized flag? lUisiness 
is business. .\merican shipowners forced 
through the new shi]) registry because they 
tliought it was good business. They are per- 
fectly willing to hoist the flag and rave about 
its beauty just as long as it is good business. 
But when those blasted foreigners begin to 
imagine that the .American flag stands for 
.American wages and conditions — why, then 
it is time to wax frothy at the mouth and 
accuse American workers of using insidious 
tactics ! 

.A":ain we ask: Can vou beat it? 



THE SUR\T\'AL OE THE FIT. 



Slowly but surely, the old reactionaries, 
aristocrats and exploiters of labor are being 
drawn out from behind their barriers of eva- 
sion, .subterfuge and palliation. As their sev- 
eral excuses for the cause of unemployment 
and poverty are discredited by facts giving 
the lie to all their contentions, they are com- 
pelled more and more to face the issues 
squarely ; and finding the latter course in con- 
flict with all their desires, some admit their 
inability to solve the problem, under the now 
existing system of "property before human 
rights." 

.At the last annual dinner of the Institute 
of Sanitary Engineers in London, Sir W il- 
liam Ramsey raised the question of whether 
the unfit should be left to die. surprising his 
audience by asking whether it was right that 
people should be coddled as tiiey are at ])rcs- 
ent. Said Sir Ramsey : 

Where they were doing something to prolong 
the lives of some of the unt-'it. would it not be 
better to let some of them die out? . . . They 
insisted on being educated and then came to 
school starved. Then they had to be supplied 
with breakfast and later given shoes. 

Cltimately he said they would have to take 
over the children entirely, adding that he 
wondered where that sort of thing would end. 

The brutal frankness of Sir William Ram- 
sey is merely an echo of the general ideas of 
the wealthy and indolent aristocrat regarding 
the poor or producing element of society. 
Let the pauper die. is the thought and wishes 
of tiiat element who. like Bishop Hatto of 
story book fame, are annoyed by the cries 
of the struggles for bread. 

The unfit from the point of view of the 
William Ramsey type are the toilers, and 
the children of the toilers when they are sub- 
merged in the desperate struggle for exist- 
ence. And here it is calmly proposed that 
they should be eliminated as a nuisance and 
a menace to societ}'. 

L'nder the hardy practices of the \'ikings 
it was customary to place the young upon 
the hillside for exposure, and if the subject 
survived the ordeal it was considered fit : if 
it succumbed it was unfit and necessarily 
perished. 

Taking those grounds as a basis of action 
or comparison, and reverting, as Sir William 
Ramsey would have us do, to the age of sav- 
agery, those who could live under the most 
intolerable conditions would be the fittest to 



survive. Here again is plutcxrratic inconsist- 
ency manifested. While considering the 
workers and their offspring as unfit, even 
though they exist under the most miserable 
and desperately hard conditions, the upper 
strata of society abrogates to itself the right 
to be considered as fit although not exposed 
to struggle or hardship. If Sir William 
Ramsey actually means what he says regard- 
ing the obliteration of the unfit from the 
earth, civilization would be benefited greatly 
thereby if his suggestions were put into 
practice. But his construction upon the 
meaning of the unfit must be rever.sed. The 
parasite should be suppressed, while those 
elements of society who produce or construct 
a better and greater civilization .should survive. 



Not very long ago a certain gentleman ap- 
peared before a Congressional Committee at 
Washington and said that he did not know 
of a single instance where human lives had 
been lost on the Pacific Coast on account of 
a deckload of lumber. The Jour.nal chal- 
lenged the statement, but the marine "ex- 
pert" who rendered that testimony preferred 
to ignore the challenge for perfectly obvious 
reasons. Now we have some additional facts 
for the "expert." In another column of this 
issue appear the names of ten members of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific who lost 
their lives in the wreck of the ill-fated steam- 
schooner "I<"rancis H. Leggett." Besides the 
ten sailors there were sacrificed all the men 
of the fire-room, the personnel of the .stew- 
ards' department and some fifty passengers. 
The "Francis H. Leggett" was laden with 
lumber, including a heavy deckload which 
must have made her topheavy. .At any rate, 
the two lone survivors .say that the "Leggett" 
ca])sizcd immediately after the crew had taken 
steps to rid the heavily laboring vessel of 
her deckload and thus les.sen the danger of 
capsizing. ( )f course, it will never be defi- 
nitelv established that the "Leggett" turned 
lurlle solely on account of her heavy deck- 
li)ad. But is it not reasonable to assume that 
the vessel and all those precious lives would 
have been saved had it not been for the heavy 
(leckk)ad ? 



"Captain" Robert Dollar and several other 
employers in California who love to pose as 
public-spirited citizens but never give work 
to a white man if a Jap or Hindoo can be 
obtained, have formed a non-partisan polit- 
ical club to further the gubernatorial aspira- 
tions of "Captain" Fredericks, better known 
as the pocket edition of "General" Otis. All 
the fake "Captains" and the stage "Ginerals" 
in the Golden State seem to have banded to- 
gether to save California. Really, this is too 
good — it beats the best production of the 
Orpheum circuit, for the actors in the show 
are by no means amateurs. Like the devil 
tliey are adepts at quoting Scripture to suit 
tlicir purpose. But they have "performed" 
in similar shows for so many, many years 
that the dear people have ceased to take them 
seriously — long, long ago. 



.A trade union without the right and 
power to strike is an anomaly. .A trade 
union, the chief use of which is to make a 
strike impossible, as under the compulsory 
arbitration system, is a crime against com- 
mon sense. 



One reason why the interest of the worker 
and the capitalist is not identical is the fact 
that the interest all goes to the capitali.st. 



"^ " — 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WAR AND THE INTERESTS OF LABOR. 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



An aftermath of war is the heavy addition 
to the national budget: interest on the war 
debt and payments on the principal, compensa- 
tion for property destroyed, and military pen- 
sions. There is a belief widely held that this 
country, at least, is rich enough to accept the 
financial burden, even of a great war, without 
serious injury to its people. In an ultimate 
sense the United States, like all other coun- 
tries, is poor. It is too poor to meet the obli- 
gations that the current formulation of political 
ethics imposes upon it. Current political ethics 
requires the state to free its citizens from the 
costs of epidemic disease; to segregate from its 
life-stream the elements carrying mental and 
moral degeneracy; to educate its children prop- 
erly so as to bring to light all their hidden 
resources for work and life. These obligations 
the state does not meet, or it meets them in- 
adequately; it lacks the means to do rnore. 
From the point of view of current political 
ethics, the modern state is an honest and 
well-meaning bankrupt, meeting some of its 
obligations in full, others in part, and repudi- 
ating still others altogether. Saddle the state 
with the additional and preferred lien of war 
debt, and its moral obligations to its people 
will be more sadly neglected than they now 
are. 

Whole Burden Rests Upon Workers. 
It is obviously the common people, the work- 
ing class, whose interests are most seriously 
prejudiced by any neglect by the state of its 
social obligations. It is the working class that 
suffers most severely from faulty sanitation and 
inadequate hospital service; from contamina- 
tion of blood through the presence in society 
of defective strains. It is the children of the 
working class whose education is most likely 
to be neglected, and whose chances in life are 
consequently impaired. Accordingly it can 
hardly be denied that there is at least a modi- 
cum of truth in the statement that, whoever 
pays the war taxes, it is upon the workers that 
the whole burden finally rests. 

Occasionally one hears the assertion that war 
is worth its cost because of the quickening of 
the national life which follows it. The "na- 
tional life," of which much of the conscious 
life of the individual is a part, is no doubt a 
social product, and is capable of undergoing 
rapid and profound changes. Were a great 
war to sweep over the modern world, it would 
affect in some measure every expression of 
thought and every manifestation of feeling. 
Nationally and individually, we should be trans- 
formed, perhaps. Possibly we should have a 
richer literature and art, a more significant 
social and political life. These, however, are 
not working-class values, and it is in working- 
class values that our present interest lies. 

The most significant interest of the working 
class is involved in the readjustment of the rela- 
tions of labor and capital. In every industrial 
state, labor and capital present conflicting eco- 
nomic interests; they present, further, conflict- 
ing conceptions of rights and duties. Em- 
ployer and employee are far from an agreement 
as to the meaning of a "right to a job," or 
of a right to a continuous income from invested 
capital. Of the two systems of asserted rights, 
that of the employer is the more intelligible to 
the general public. It is nothing but a trans- 
ference to the employment of labor of the 
principles long accepted as properly regulating 
the purchase and sale of commodities. The la- 
borer's system of rights is something new in 
the world, and therefore not readily under- 
stood. 

The laborer would convince the general public 
— the ultimate arbiter in this as in other mat- 
ters — that the labor contract differs materially 
from the other contracts, and should be inter- 
preted in the light of a special tradition. Al- 
tliough the public accepts free competition as a 
satisfactory principle governing the purchase 
and sale of commodities, the laborer would 
have the public accept the principle of the 
closed shop as regulative of the labor contract. 
An agreement of dealers and producers to raise 
prices is a conspiracy against the public; an 
agreement of laborers for the purpose of raising 
wages is not a conspiracy, according to the ad- 
vocates of the labor program. A merchant 
who should post a clerk at the entrance to a 
competitor's place of business, to dissuade pros- 
pective customers from entering, would very 
quickly feel the whole weight of the law. The 
laborer who "pickets" an "unfair" shop, feels 
that he is quite within his rights, so long as 
he limits himself to peaceable persuasion. The 
laborer, evidently, is attempting to introduce a 
new system of rights. Possibly the system is 
sound, and conducive to the public welfare. 
But the burden of proof is upon those who 
introduce new systems. 

Of this new system the general public has 
already accepted some elements. The right to 
organize is generally granted. The principle 
of collective bargaining rules in an extensive 
part of the modern industrial field. The labor 
contract is being differentiated from other forms 
of contract; this is already evident. The process 
is a slow one, however, and makes head only 
as a result of persistent efforts on the part of 
the leaders of labor. But persistence alone 
would accomplish little; the support of the 



public is essential; and the cause of labor is 
greatly strengthened if the more broad-minded 
and generous employers regard it sympatheti- 
cally. If, for example, labor can convince the 
more liberal employers that an eight-hour day 
is desirable, the public is likely to regard with 
favor a strike to force other employers also to 
limit the working day to eight hours. The 
strike will receive wide popular attention, and, 
if successful, will be credited with the victory. 
The preliminary work of preparing the public 
mind, and winning a certain amount of sup- 
port among employers, although indispensable, 
remains unrecorded. Hence the progress of 
labor is likely to be regarded as the result of 
a series of struggles between employers and 
employees. But it is just as truly the outcome 
of a conflict of principles in the social mind. 
Peace Essential to Progress. 

Peace, domestic and international, is a pre- 
requisite to the working out of this conflict 
of principles, and to the social validation of the 
laborer's scheme of rights. A war in progress 
distracts the public attention; its influence is in- 
evitably reactionary. Further, the conclusion 
of the war injects into civil life large numbers 
of men who have been trained to drastic action 
upon quick judgments. The industrial world 
is filled with little Alexanders, slashing away 
with their swords at apparent Gordian knots 
that civilian patience might have unraveled. Let 
it be granted that the war-like ex-officer, in the 
role of employer, is no more of a menace to 
the interests of the working class than is the 
war-like ex-private in the ranks of labor to 
the interests of capital. It is none the less 
the laborer's interest which is most seriously 
prejudiced by the substitution of the spirit of 
war for the spirit of peace. The influence of 
strife and turmoil is reactionary in the end. 
It strengthens, rather than weakens, the hold 
upon the social mind of the employer's ethical 
formulation. 

The interests of industrial labor are bound 
up with peace. Recent historical tendencies, 
we have seen, have steadily encroached upon 
the field of possible gain to labor from war, 
until that field has practically disappeared. 
Recent tendencies have also steadily increased 
the weight of the burdens imposed by war 
upon labor, until these burdens have become 
intolerable. The hopes of labor for general 
social recognition of its claims, and for their 
realization through appropriate institutions, can 
prosper only through the spirit of peace. All 
these things the men of the working class are 
beginning to realize. They are therefore justi- 
fied in their claim that the labor movement 
tliroughout the world is the best guaranty ot 
peace. — Alvin S. Johnson, in the Atlantic 
Monthly. 



UNPAID WAR BILLS. 



Hi.i^lily illuiiiiiiating' is a glance at the 
national (lebt,-.; oi the countries involved in 
the European war — debts which represent 
the unpaid balances of the ccst of former 
wars and emergency loans for the purpose 
of increasing armaments: 

Nationaf Debt. Interest. 

Austria-Hungary $3,612,389,000 $144,496,000 

France 6,286,435,000 192,762,000 

Germany 1,224,158,000 41,981,000 

Russia 4,507,071,000 180,283,000 

Servia 135,886,221 6,115,000 

England 3,389,577,000 101,060,000 



Scientists in both Germany and France 
are seriously trying to ascertain if there is 
any value in the divining- rod for locating 
underground water and metals. 

DIED. 

John Carry, No. 563, a native of West Indies, 
age 37, died at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 19, 
1914. 

The following members were drowned in tlie 
wreck of the steam-schooner "Francis H. Leg- 
gett," off the Oregon Coast, on Sept. 18, 1914: 

Fred. A. Anders, No. 1389, a native of Ger- 
many, age 31. 

William Halvorsen, No. 1425, a native of Nor- 
way, age 44; 

Hans Peter Holm, No. 2081, a native of Den- 
mark, age 26. 

Anton Johansen, No. 2160, a native of Nor- 
way, age 33. 

Theodore Jordfald, No. 1490, a native of Nor- 
way, age 36. 

Gustaf Carl Lindeloff, No. 505, a native of 
Finland, age 40. 

Martin Julius Madsen, No. 1593, a native of 
Norway, age 48. 

Karl F'riedrich Nagel, No. 1173, a native of 
Germany, age 24. 

Wilhelm Sellers, No. 1897, a native of Ger- 
many, age 29. 

Carl Johan Soderman, No. 2485, a native of 
.Sweden, age 28. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 28, 1914. 

Regular v^^eekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m.. Jack Rosen presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. A Quarterly Finance Committee 
was elected to go over the Union's accounts for 
the past quarter. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 21, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
518 Yates St. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 21, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 44 Union Ave. North. Tel. 
East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 
JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553 



San Pedro Agency. Sept. 21, 1914. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN. Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 14, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 24, 1914. 

The regular weekly meeting was called to 
order at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping improving. The 
Quarterly F'inance Committee was elected to 
go over the finances of the union for the past 
quarter. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 17, 1914. 
.Shipping slow; plenty of men ashore. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. Box No. 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 16, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; plenty of men 
ashore. 

, HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
27^ Second St., Bickle Bldg., Room No. 10. 
Phone Main 9731. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE STONE SHIPS. 



Soon after sunrise, Nov. 30, 1861, six- 
teen whalers pointed their blunt noses sea- 
ward and left behind them the wharves of 
New Bedford, never to return. It was the 
first fleet probably in the history of the 
world that set sail witli the deliberate in- 
tention of sinking to the bottom of the 
sea. Also it was the first fleet of whalers 
that ever enjoyed the distinction of a 
salute from Government guns to speed it 
on its way. As it passed Fort Taher, the 
garrison greeted it with thirty-four guns, 
to which the whaleships replied gun for 
gun with all the scrupulous etiquette of 
naval vessels under the same circum- 
stances. The fleet was under command of 
Commodore French, and proceeding under 
sealed orders, but every man in it from 
captains to cabin-boys was aware they 
were going to make history somewhere 
below the \'irginia Capes. Rodney French, 
one-time Mayor of .\ew Bedford, had se- 
lected the old "Garland" as his flagship, 
and with a view to upholding his naval 
dignity, had caused a "Quaker" gun, made 
of a spar and painted black, to be rigged 
up amidships. The Commodore was very 
proud of his harmless piece of ordnance, 
and wrote in the log under date of Dec. 
7th, "Passed a schooner which eyed our 
big gim fearfully, and gave us a wide 
berth." 

Eight other e.x-whalers were also out- 
ward bound from other New England 
ports, all converging to the same point 
south, where the New Bedford fleet was 
heading. They left behind them in the 
various ports from which they sailed tons 
of whaling utensils piled on the wharves, 
and nothing was left aboard any of them 
to show they had ever chased the ham- 
merhead or the riglet whale, save the oil- 
stained woodwork, and the rank smell of 
blubber that hung about them like an in- 
visible aura. Not only did this strange 
fleet put to sea under sealed orders, but 
the greatest secrecy had been observed 
from the day when a stranger had ap- 
peared at the office of Bartlett & Sons in 
New Bedford and commissioned them to 
collect thirty-six windjammers, to the hour 
when they slipped silently away into the 
gray fog of the North Atlantic. Their 
destination was unknown, and no report 
of their having sailed was permitted to 
reach the public until five days later. Even 
the captains had no inkling of whither they 
were bound, or why they carried the cargo 
they did until the fleet had been twenty- 
four hours at sea. The cargo was neither 
merchandise nor arms, though it came 
under the head of "munitions of war." 
Every ship was loaded with stone, huge 
granite blocks, loose rocks from stony New 
England pastures, and even ancient head- 
stones gathertd from long abandoned 
graveyards. Farmers had even pulled down 
their stone walls and carted them down 
to the docks, .some of them even went so 
far as to take up the stones that paved 
their dooryards, and horse-blocks and 
hitching-posts did not escape. Bartlett & 
Sons paid .SO cents for every ton of stone 
that went into the holds. Before the stone 
was shipped, however, each vessel was 
stripped, put on the ways, and a hole 
bored in the bottom, and into this hole was 
driven a wooden plug to which was at- 
tached a bolt and wrench by means of 



which the plug could be instantly pulled 
out. As these ships were sacrificed in the 
service of our country, they deserve to 
have their names remembered along with 
Hobson's "Merrimac." They were the 
"Archer," "Richmond," "Courier," "Ken- 
sington," "Herald," "Maria Theresa," "Re- 
becca Sims," "Potomac," "Leonidas," 
"South America," "Cossack," "Frances 
Henrietta," "Garland," "Amazon," "Har- 
vest," and "American." Their captains 
were William North, Martin Malloy, S. 
Brayton, Benjamin Tilton, A. H. GiflFord, 
Thomas Bailey, James Willis, Thomas 
Brown, Joseph Howland, J. Childs, M. 
Cummisky, Rodney French, J. Swift, W. 
'i'ayhir, and W. A. Heard. They averaged 
in tonnage from 231 to 400. None carried 
less than 190 tons of stone, most of them 
carried 300, and one, the "South America," 
Captain Chadwick, carried .SOO. Five 
thousand two hundred and twenty-one 
tons of stone went sailing southward to 
the rendezvous at Savannah, and conjec- 
ture ran wild as to what was to be done 
with it. One newspaper gravely printed 
the statement that the ancient catapult was 
to be rc\i\e(l and the Confederates were 
to be put to flight with showers of stones. 
Others said they were to build a fort at 
some point of vantage, and many believed 
they were to be used for entrenchments, 
though how such a vast amount of stone 
could be conveyed inland was a poser. No 
one came anywhere near the truth. The 
"Rebecca Sims," commanded by Captain 
Willis, who as late as 1897 was still living 
in New Bedford, led the procession into 
Savannah, nearly a week in advance of 
her consorts, being the biggest ship of 
the whole sixteen. When the others strag- 
gled in, the whole fleet was sent back to 
Port Royal, there to await the arrival of 
twenty-four more from the north. The 
second section of the fleet left New Bed- 
ford Dec. 9th, but only twenty reached 
Port Royal — these brought 6,000 additional 
tons of stone. By this time it had leaked 
out that the stone ships were to be used 
to block Charleston and Savannah harbors 
to Confederate privateers. It was no 
suggested to Lieutenant Hobson the idea 
of sinking the "Merrimac" in Havana 
harbor, only Hobson did it to keep the 
enemy in, while Captain Davis intended to 
keep them out. Hobson also did in '98 
with one ship what 36 ships utterly failed 
to do in '61. To Captain Charles Davis 
of the "Wabash" was delegated the task of 
sinking the ships where they would do the 
most good. Captain Davis was for seven 
years prior to the Civil War chief of 
the Coast Survey, and in that capacity had 
greatly improved the entrance to Charles- 
ton harbor. Now, however, he was or- 
dered to destroy that same harbor. Not 
much time was lost by Davis when once 
the fleet of stone-carriers was assembled. 
On Dec. 17th he convoyed sixteen of the 
old whalers from Port Royal to Charleston 
with the "Catawba," "Philadelphia" and 
"Ericsson" to do the work, and the "Mohi- 
can," "Ottawa," and "Pocahontas" as es- 
cort. 

As they approached the entrance to the 
harbor in the dusk of evening a terrific 
explosion rent the air. Next morning the 
lighthouse was discovered in ruins, having 
been blown up by the Confederates when 
they spied the Northern ships nearing 
Charleston. Davis' idea was to so place the 



vessels that when they were all submerged 
the main ship channel would be blocked 
in such a way that the most skilful pilot 
wcHild find it impossible to steer a safe 
course. He also intended to dam the en- 
trance at a point where the current would 
lodge sediment so as to form a permanent 
bar in a short time. At high tide the sig- 
nal was given and the "Tenadores," the 
oldest ship in the fleet, was permitted to 
go quickly to the bottom on the north side 
of the passage, and was immediately fol- 
lowed by the "Leonidas" less than a half 
a mile away on the south side with 200 
tons of New England stone walls to keep 
it down. In the comparatively narrow lane 
of water between these fourteen ships were 
sent under as fast as the plugs could be 
pulled out. At low tide the masts and 
rigging emerged until the channel looked 
like a long wharf lined with shipping. 
These were quickly cut away, so there 
would be no sign of the submerged hulks 
to warn the pilot of danger. Before the 
plugs were pulled everything worth saving 
was transferred from the ex-whalers to the 
convoys whose decks were littered with 
ropes, canvas, hammocks, and pots and 
pans from the galleys. The "Robin Hood" 
alone was left of the stone ships, and at 
night just before the naval fleet departed, 
the torch was set to her oil-soaked upper 
works and reefed sails, and Captain Davis 
was lighted out to sea by a far more bril- 
liant light than had ever illuminated the 
wretched lighthouse. Many a weather- 
beaten old whaling-captain felt a salt drop 
on his cheek that was not the briny spray, 
as he looked back at the dancing waters 
that entombed his faithful ship. It was 
decided to defer the sinking of the re- 
maining ships at Savannah until it was 
seen whether the attempt to block the 
Charleston channel was successful or not. 
Captain Davis having conducted the work 
to improve the Charleston harbor for four 
years, was somewhat doubtful of the re- 
sult, being aware of the nature of the har- 
bor bottom, which was composed of soft 
sediment and mud with little sand. The 
crews of the sunken whalers were sent 
back to Port Royal on the "Philadelphia" 
and "Ericsson," and thence to New York; 
each ship had carried fourteen men, except 
the "South America," which had sixteen. 

For about a week after the sinking of 
the ships the channel was closed to any- 
thing drawing more water than a dory, 
but at the end of that time the heavily- 
loaded hulks commenced to bury them- 
selves in the mud and the waves began to 
break them up. Wreckage drifted to the 
surface with every tide, and in less than 
a fortnight what was left of the stone 
ships and stone cargoes had entirely disap- 
peared in the ooze, and so far from ob- 
structing the channel it was found that the 
sinking of the tons of granite had deep- 
ened it in places. Blockade runners and 
privateers sailed in and out of Charleston 
with perfect ease all through the war. The 
Government had purchased 36 vessels in 
all at an expense of $150,000, and the plan 
turned out an impracticable one until 37 
years later, the "Merrimac" was destroyed 
to block Havana harbor, but without any 
stone cargo to drag it below the sea-bot- 
tom. Had the whalers been sunk without 
their tons of granite, the experiment might 
have had a different result. 

The old whaling-ships had, of course. 



SSS&^^^^Si 



^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



seen their best days battling ice in the 
Arctic seas and breasting gales around 
Cape Horn, and were rotting at their 
wharves when the Navy agent commis- 
sioned the Bartletts to buy up a certain 
number of old vessels as cheaply as pos- 
sible for the experiment. Only $10 per 
ton was paid for them, but many of them 
were worth a great deal more than that, 
and all of them would have brought dou- 
ble that if broken up and sold. But it was 
more a matter of patriotism than profit 
with the hard-headed old New England 
skippers who owned them, and besides 
many whalers had fallen victims thus early 
in the rebellion to the Southern privateers, 
led by the "Alabama," and vengeance 
counted just then for more than gold. No 
peaceful ships suffered so greatly all 
through the war as the whalers, the 
"Shenandoah" alone capturing and burn- 
ing thirty-four. — Mrs. Harry Michener, in 
the "American Marine Engineer." 



'THE OCEAN" REVIEWED. 



According to the "Sailors' Magazine" Sir 
John Murray, author of "The Ocean," was 
a shipmate of Darwin on the famous "Chal- 
lenger" expedition, 1870-73. A later ex- 
pedition, the "Michael Sars," North Atlan- 
tic Expedition, 1910, he took part in, and 
wrote on the "Depths of the Ocean." Be- 
sides the learned author has nearly all the 
letters in the alphabet after his name. All 
of which goes to show the author is an 
authority, if not the authority on the 
science of the sea. The writing is technical 
and yet popular, dealing with the depth of 
the ocean, the waters of the ocean, life in 
the ocean, marine deposits, ocean circula- 
tions, and kindred subjects. If you want to 
know the reasons for the Gulf Stream's ex- 
istence ; what becomes of the salt in the 
ocean ; the loneliest part of the ocean ; the 
depth and salinity of the mighty deep, what 
is at the bottom of the ocean and a hun- 
dred other things the author explains. As 
an example of how simple a really great 
scientist can be on a subject that interests 
the general reader, namely, the effect of 
pressure, he says : 

"There is a widespread view among peo- 
ple that under great pressure water be- 
comes much denser and may attain some- 
thing of the consistency of ireacle, that 
ships and men, when they sink in the sea, 
'reach their level,' but do not reach the 
bottom. The Sargasso Sea has been repre- 
sented as a great whirlpool, in which men 
and ships float about at all depths. AVithin 
the past year the writer has often been 
asked if the 'Titanic' really reached the 
bottom in a depth of three miles. During 
the 'Challenger' expedition, after a funeral 
at sea, the blue-jackets sent a deputation 
aft to ask if 'Bill' would go right to the 
bottom when committed to the deep with 
a shot attached to his feet, or would be 
'find his level' and there float about for 
evermore? Another question was, if 'Bill' 
re?.lly did go to the bottom, what would he 
be like on reaching bottom at four or five 
miles? 

"A live rabbit was on one occasion sent 
down to over 500 fathoms on a line. The 
body came up very little altered to all ap- 
pearance, the bones were all intact, and the 
lungs were the only viscera that seemed 
to be affected by the pressure. Even at 



3000 fathoms a human body would be little 
altered in outward appearance. 

"The 'Titanic' is probably now lying on 
the bottom in a very little altered condi- 
tion ; only those parts of the structure 
would be burst inwards ('imploded') into 
which water could not enter rapidly enough 
to equalize the pressure on the two sides,- 
say, of an iron plate. As the vessel sank 
deeper and deeper, the corks in all the 
wine and beer bottles would be driven in if 
not quite full, and ultimately every her- 
metically closed chamber or recess would 
be imploded. 

"The fact is that anything that will sink 
to the bottom of a tumbler of water will 
practically sink to the bottom of the deep- 
est ocean. This is true at least for all sub- 
stances more compressible than water. We 
have proof of this in the fact that the 
whole floor of the ocean is strewn with 
the delicate calcareous and siliceous shells 
of organisms which once lived in the sur- 
face waters." 

This book has a rare and a melancholy 
value, for as we write, the author has been 
killed by a motor accident. Sir John Mur- 
ray was the greatest scientist England has 
])roduced since Darwin. He was Darwin's 
successor in many ways. 

"The Ocean" is published by Henry Holt 
& Company. The price is 50 cents net. 



GERMAN POTASH INDUSTRY. 



Kali, or potash salts, in natural deposits, 
was discovered in Alsace in 1904, when 
deep borings were being made in the 
hope of striking oil. In 1909 the first 
kali mining shaft was completed in this 
district, and the following year 37,000 tons 
of kali salts were extracted. Since then 
other mines have been developed and the 
work has grown rapidly. Twelve mines 
are now in operation in this district. The 
proportion of potash to be produced by 
these mines, as determined by the kali 
syndicate, is understood be be approxi- 
mately 4 per cent of the total annual Ger- 
man production, which is some 10,000,000 
tons. About half of that amount is for 
home consumption and the other half for 
exportation. The United States takes 
nearly 50 per cent of the total export. In 
Alsace, so far as at present known, the 
deposits of potash underlie an area of 
nearly seven square miles. They range 
in thickness from six to thirty feet and 
contain an estimated deposit of 300,000,- 
000 tons of pure potash. The state is an 
interested party in the kali industry, and 
the exploitation of the mines and the sale 
of the products are regulated by special 
law. The main object of the legislation 
is to prevent injurious competition and a 
loss of national wealth through a lower- 
ing of the price. The exploiting of potash 
mines and the sale of potash is free, but 
so hedged about with restrictions and 
limitations that it is all practically under 
the control of the state through the syn- 
dicate. The amount of mineral to be ex- 
tracted is fixed for each mine by the 
committee of allotment. For new mines 
a provisional amount is allotted for a 
period of two years and then a definite 
allowance is made. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Old wax phonograph records, broken and 
melted, make excellent insulation for elec- 
trical work. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, Ul. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS : 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 
BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND. 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR. WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 2295. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND. 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main street 

DETROIT. MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBTTRG. N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE. PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
MARINE HOSPITALS: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS: 
A.shland, Wis. OKdensburg. N. Y. 

A.-^litabuln Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Hiiff.nlo, N. Y. Port Huron. Mich. 

Diihith, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Kscanaba, Mich. Marquette. Mich. 

(!r;ind Hn\en. Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. .Saglnnw, Mich. 

l'.;iighton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

r.udlngton, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich, 

M.inistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

I'Jrle, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



works or not, he is a luinian being;, a citi- 
zen, a voter, a part of this Government. 
He resents an injunction by wholesale in 
a labor dispute, if it be issued by a Federal 
court. It is needless to inquire why, and 
all sufficient to know that such is the fact. 
I want to restrict these Federal injunctions 
and relegate as far as possible everything 
in these labor disputes to the State courts. 
A better understanding, a getting together, 
will be the result. An .\nierican who feels 
that he is mistreated is a dangerous thing 
to deal with, but give him a fair chance to 
be heard, permit him to discuss his griev- 
ance and you have a compromising citizen 
who is put upon his responsibility to do 
right, and then he will do right." 



THE CANAL AND THE FUTURE. 



We have now reached that time when 
we can date all things as having hap- 
pened before the Canal opened or after 
the Canal opened. 

The next five years promise to make 
more changes on this coast than did the 
last twenty years. 

To-day there are a number of large 
steamers trading through the Panama 
Canal manned or rather unmanned by 
crews that are an absolute menace to the 
life and liberty of bona fide seafaring men. 

Men without knowledge or skill, in many 
cases not even able to speak the English 
language. Men without the least under- 
standing of the need of organization and 
the necessity for mutual self-help, sailing 
for pitifully low wages and under dis- 
graceful conditions. 

This constitutes a direct threat to the 
conditions of the organized seamen of 
the Pacific Coast (where the conditions are 
none too good). If this state of affairs 
is to continue for any considerable length 
of time the life of every maritime organ- 
ization on the Pacific will be threatened. 
We may, however, take it for granted that 
the maritime workers engaged in the ship- 
ping industry of this Coast will see to it 
that former squabbles will not prevent 
them from putting up a solid front to the 
common enemy. 

The time will probably soon be at hand 
when we must make a fight for our lives. 
Every ship that uses the Panama Canal 
must be a union ship — this is not only 
right, it is necessary (we are speaking of 
coast to coast ships). Before we can bring 
about this state of affairs there is certain 
organization work to be done out here 
on the Pacific, and there is a lot to be 
done on the Atlantic. To help the At- 
lantic we must vote the financial assist- 
ance asked by the International Seamen's 
L^nion of America. This will help them 
on the -A.tlantic at a time when they are 
in sore need of assistance. 

The next step is to go to work individu- 
ally and make known to all seafarers that 
the Canal trade must be a union trade. 
Don't sit down and wait for the officers of 
the union to do this for you, but see to 
it that all bona fide sailors sailing in that 
trade are urged to work with us. 

We should have as many of our men as 
is possible sailing in those ships this win- 



ter so that the good news may be allowed 
to .soak in. 

Our time will be here in the early spring 
if not sooner, and we must be ready to 
start something worth while then. 

Comrades, our friends (?) who wish t<i 
see the breakdown of the labor move- 
ment are still with us ; but, by intelligent 
organizing work this winter we can put 
ourselves (that is, our organization) in 
such a position that they will have to 
postpone their calamity howling for some 
time to come. Let our watchword be 
greater solidarity, and better industrial or- 
ganization, always remembering that this 
struggle will not end till the ultimate 
overthrow of the capitalistic system and 
the establishment of the Industrial Re- 
public. The worker who understands this 
knows why he makes sacrifices, and why 
he has to continue to struggle even when 
he appears to make no headway. This is 
a glorious fight: let us keep it up. 

Ch.\s. M. AM!Ri:cirr. 



CONGRESSIONAL SIDE-STEPPING. 

L'nder tiie heading "Immigration: \\'hy 
conserve the West and leave the front 
door open," a speech by Congressman 
Johnson of Washington, appears in the 
Congressional Record. In this speech. Mr. 
Johnson says : 

"Think of it, more than '>0 per cent, of 
all of Arizona, 87 per cent, of Nevada, 
more than 80 per cent, (jf Idaho, 80 per 
cent, of Utah, almost 70 per cent, of Wyo- 
ming, 65 per cent, of Montana, 62 per cent. 
of New Mexico, half of Oregon, half of 
California, half of Colorado, and 40 i)er 
cent, of my own State of Washington, all 
conserved together with their resources for 
posterity. Whose posterity? Ours or for 
children of Southern Europe and Asia yet 
unl)nrn? Strike these vast areas from tiie 
total before you begin td figure popula- 
tion per acre." 

Mr. Johnson's opposition to the policy 
of conservation leads him to represent the 
government as holding this vast area out 
of use. As a matter of fact, it is doing 
nothing of the kind. Referring to Mr. 
Johnson's remarks. Mr. Philip P. Wells, 
formerly counsel for the Xatitmal Conser- 
vation .Association, stated in The Public 
of Chicago, on February 27 : 

There is a better retort to Mr. John- 
son in the bright lexicon of youth, which 
may be adapted to adult conventionalities 
by saying that his statement is not true. 
The "reserved" and "withdrawn" lands 
which make up his totals are not held out 
of use. They are classified for use. In 
degrees varying with each class and de- 
termined by the Federal statutes relating 
thereto, they may be used by anybody 
who is ready to use them. The national 
forests, which Mr. Johnson especially 
loathes, are the most open of all. Their 
ripe timber is for sale on the stump to 
the highest bidder: their pasturage is for 
rent to the neighboring ranchmen : their 
metalliferous minerals are open to all tak- 
ers at a nominal price. As for the sites 
"withdrawn" for water power conserva- 
tion, every one is open to lease by the 
first applicant. The coal deposits are for 
sale in fee simple at the appraised price 
and their surface is open to agricultural 
use without price. But for timber, pas- 
turage, water power and coal, the public 



must be paid some little approximation of 
their value, and, as to all but coal, the 
user can get only a leasehold, leaving in 
the public freehold, which includes the 
power of regulation by stipulation in the 
lease and also the power at some future 
day to take the land value as rental. 
Hence Johnsons tears! Doubtless he 
would weep as copiously if the taking 
were from private landlords by the instru- 
mentality of the single tax. 

The laws should be amended to make 
possible a better leasehold than can now 
be had for water power. That they have 
not been so amended is due chiefly to the 
opposition of Mr. Johnson and his kind 
during the past seven years. 

The real trouble is not so much the 
government's conservation policy as the 
witholding by private owners from use of 
lands, possession of which has been re- 
linquished by the government. In the 
year 1901, 750,000 acres in the Olynijjic 
forests of Washington were opened osten- 
sibly to settlement. W'hat has been the 
result? Speaking on this matter in the 
House on June 17 of last year. Congress- 
man Bryan, of Washington, said : "Ten 
years later only about 600 acres of the 
entire elimination had been cultivated at 
all, and title to -iZiJIO acres had passed 
into the hands of large owners, with three 
companies holding 178,000 acres." It is 
the privately owned, not the government 
owned lands which are closed to labor. 

Of all the shining examples in Con- 
gress of men who can talk all about a 
subject without touching on the essential 
point, Mr. Johnson shows the greatest 
ability, in performance of the feat. 



THE RICKMERS LINE. 

On May 21 the well-known Rickmers 
Line, of Bremen, celebrated the completion 
of the 80th year of its existence. What is 
now a very important commercial under- 
taking started in 1834 as a small boat- 
building concern, establi.shed in Brenier- 
haven by a ship's carpenter from Heligo- 
land, named R. C. Rickmers. The business 
flourished, and very soon the yard was 
constructing whaling vessels. About this 
time there was a considerable expansion in 
the importation of rice, and this gave Rick- 
mers the idea of building a rice mill in 
Bremen. The founder of the firm died in 
1886. and his heirs in 1889 founded the 
Rickmers Rice-Mills, Shipowning and Ship- 
building Co., with a capital of M.8,000,000. 
which in 1895 was increased to M. 13,000,000. 

In 1896 the firm opened a steamship serv- 
ice to the Far East, to which, in 1899. a 
river service on the Yangtsze was added. 
A passenger service between Bangkok, 
Swatow, and Hongkong was established in 
1903. An important change was carrie<l 
out in 1912, when the shipowning business 
was transferred to Hamburg, and placed 
under separate management. Previously, 
in 1911, a regular service to Siberia had 
l)een started. Finally, this year, a steam- 
ship line to the Black Sea and the Mediter- 
ranean has been started, and the service 
to the Far East extended. 

At the present time the Rickmers Line 
controls a fleet of 17 modern steamers, in 
addition to which seven chartered steamers 
are running for the line. It also owns the 
largest German sailing ship with auxiliary 
engines, the five-master "R. C. Rickmers," 
named after the founder of the firm. 



rmm^ 



SL^ 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



AT THE GATE. 



"Next," called Saint Peter. 

A pompous person arose from the bench 
and grandly approached the bar. His silk 
hat glistened majestically and his face bore 
a patronizing smile full of suavity and con- 
fidence. 

"Name, please." 

"I am a self-made philanthropist." 

"I don't see your name amongst the list 
of eligibles. What are your qualifica- 
tions?" 

"You may put me down for " 

"Hold up, I'm not asking for a dona- 
tion." 

"I beg your pardon. I am so used to 
dealing with charity committees, I quite 
forgot. I meant to say, you may put me 
down as one who loved his fellow-men." 

"Oh, oh ! You are trying to break in 
by the Abou-Ben-Adhem route?" 

"Possibly. Abou has always been one 
of my favorite characters in history." 

"Always !" 

"Perhaps I might say ever since I could 
afford it." 

"That's the way with most philanthrop- 
ists. They are just as virtuous as they 
can afiford to be. You are quite sure you 
loved your fellow-men, are you?" 

"Why, certainly. Didn't I " 

"Wouldn't it be more correct to say that 
you wanted your fellow-men to love you — 
that is, as soon as you could afiford to 
think about such a secondary matter?" 

"Not at all. How can you doubt my 



"Didn't you find at a certain point in 
your life they were beginning to look ask- 
ance at you as a selfish grabber?" 

"It is so hard to make people under- 
stand." 

"And when you tried to placate them 
and recover their favor, you had nothing" 
to give them but money?" 

"r>ut loiik what was done with the 
money." 

"Yes, but it nex'er occurred to ynu that 
just as much could be done with the 
money without having it pass through 
your sticky hands." 

"You also seem to misunderstand me." 

"Do I? Let us see. You said you loved 
your fellow-men. Did you love all of 
them, or just a part of them?" 

"I loved " 

"Did you love the competitors you forced 
out of business?" 

"I " 

"Did you love the employees who 
worked for you at a meager wage, and 
without whom you could not have amassed 
your millions?" 

"When they " 

"And especially did you love the little 
children employees who had to work so 
hard that their growth was stunted and 
their capacity for pleasure ff)r ever dulled?" 

"I was a victim " 

"Did you love the tenants in your rick- 
ety and unsanitary tenements?" 

"My tenements were " 

"Did you love the legislators whom your 
agents bribed and the people who rode on 
your miserable trolley cars?" 

"You do not make allowances for " 

"Here, clerk! Take this man out and 
strip him of everything he possesses. Then 
give it back to him a little at a time." 



LOWER CALIFORNIA. 



Lower California, Mexico's isolated penin- 
sula, the coast of which the Pacific fleet of 
the L^nited States is now patrolling, is one of 
the least-known territories in North America. 
The following facts concerning this arm of 
land, which projects about 800 miles south- 
easterly from the southern border of Cali- 
fornia, have been issued in a bulletin of the 
National Geographic Society. The width of 
the peninsula varies from about 30 to more 
than 100 miles, and its irregular coast line, 
over 2000 miles long, is bordered by nu- 
merous islands. Being mainly a mountainous, 
desert region, it is thinly peopled and presents 
many .sharply contrasting conditions. Low, 
sun-scorched plains, where death by thirst 
awaits the traveler, lie close to the bases of 
towering granite peaks, belted by forests and 
capped in winter by snow ; desolate plateaus 
of black lava look down on valleys seamed 
with green-bordered streams. 

At the time of its discovery, in 1533, by an 
expedition sent out by Cortes in search of a 
fabulously rich island it is estimated to have 
been inhabited by 25,000 Indians, who vigor- 
ously resented the intrusion and prevented the 
newcomers from getting a foothold for more 
than a century. The Jesuits then came in 
and were wonderfully successful in exploring 
the peninsula and establishing missions. They 
established three main trails, one along each 
coast and the third down the middle, which 
serve as the regular routes of travel to-day. 
The Indians have vanished from all parts of 
their former territory except a few in the 
extreme northern end. 

During the last half century all parts of 
the territory have been visited, mainly by 
Americans in search of mines and other natu- 
ral resources, but little of the knowledge 
gained has become available to the public. 
Gold, silver, copper, iron and other minerals 
and much fertile land have been found, but 
the scarcity of water, fuel, forage and the 
difficulties of transportation have united with 
other causes to bring about failure to de- 
velop the resources. 

The Rio Santo Domingo is the one living 
stream within the penisula which flows on 
the surface from its source to the sea 
throughout the year. These conditions have 
resulted in the development of the richest 
and most extraordinary desert flora in the 
world. The bird and mammal life, however, 
is closely related to that of Southern Cali- 
fornia. The plains abound with small desert 
mammals, such as rabbits, pocket mice, kan- 
garoo rats and others. A large number 
of the smaller desert mammals never drink 
water, it having been found impossible to 
teach some of them to take water in captivity. 
Antelope, mountain sheep, mule-deer and 
mountain lions are the only large game ani- 
mals. The peninsula is thinly peopled and 
enormous areas remain uninhabited. Lower 
California has a territorial form of govern- 
ment, and, owing to its great length, is 
divided near the middle into a northern and 
a southern district, Ensenada and La Paz 
being the respective capitals. 



LA50R'S ECONOMIC PLATrORII. 



,Swiss railways use an ambulance car 
completely equipped with electrical appli- 
ances that are supplied with current by a 
eene-rator mounted on one axle. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system, 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

INTERNATIONAL SEANEIM'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 14081/2 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
S75. 

PORTL.\Nn, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



Recently compiled official figures show 
the coke production of the United vStates 
last year to have been 46,31L369 short tons, 
a record breaker. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
nny of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

i<'ederated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



At the recent convention of the 
International Photo-Engravers' Un- 
ion the executive council was in- 
structed to take steps to bring about 
a 44-hour week instead of a 48-hour 
week, which now prevails. This 
would mean a Saturday half-holiday. 

The teamsters at Ottawa, 111., have 
won their strike against the Contract- 
ors' Association. All strikers will 
return to their former positions and 
the employers promise there will be 
no discriminations. A new agree- 
ment will be entered into the first of 
next April. This strike at one time 
assumed serious aspects, as it in- 
volved practically all of the building 
trades. 

Wide variation in the pay for the 
same or similar work is one of the 
most striking situations revealed by 
the investigation of teachers' salaries 
just completed by the United States 
Bureau of Education. The rates vary 
from $2400 a year for New York city 
elementary teachers to $45 a year in 
certain rural communities. Even in 
cities of the same class there are 
considerable diflferences in the sal- 
aries paid, although Western States 
have steadily raised the rates, which 
are fairly well standardized, the re- 
port says. The figures will be used 
to determine the actual conditions of 
the teaching profession. 

The recent convention of the In- 
ternational Wood Carvers' Associa- 
tion decided to submit to the referen- 
dum the question of affiliating with 
the Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners. The same course was taken 
on a proposition to create an inter- 
national out-of-work fund. Grand 
Rapids delegates reported that some 
manufacturers there and elsewhere 
were using a composition product 
which was sold as genuine wood 
carving. It was decided to ask the 
A. F. of L. to urge a national law 
that would prohibit this deception. 
Municipal markets to sell food at 
cost were favored. The physical ex- 
amination of workers was given much 
attention by the convention. It was 
charged that large firms in Cleveland 
and Camden, N. J., enforce this sys- 
tem, and any one with the slightest 
physical blemish is rejected, regard- 
less of his trade qualifications or cir- 
cumstances. 

The first annual report of the 
Massachusetts State Homestead 
Commission is declared to be a 
classic on the subject of providing 
homes for workers and kindred ques- 
tions. Charts show that the highest 
infant mortality is in the congested 
mill towns and the lowest in the 
towns and cities where sanitary con- 
ditions are up-to-date and where the 
people are not overcrowded. The 
need of encouraging people to enter 
the agricultural calling is pointed out, 
and also the importance of spread- 
ing information. The constitutional 
objection to State aid for working- 
men's homes is discussed and the 
commission says: "Wherever the 
State has undertaken such work, 
profound economic, social and politi- 
cal advantages have resulted." It is 
shown that the more congested the 
population the greater the number 
of deaths due to tuberculosis. Rec- 
ommendations are made concerning 
local planning boards; profitable use 
of suburban homes; assessment of 
betterments; the establishment of 
residential districts; and for the es- 
tablishment and maintenance of agri- 
cultural instruction for families. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALUS 
Navigation Sclnool 

DAY AND NIGHT 



202-4 GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DOCK 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to 
call or have their mail forwarded during 
that period, they should notify the Agent 
to hold mail until arrival. 

Anderson, P. F. Maas, R. 

Andersen, RagnvaldMathisen, Nils 
Andersen, A. -1777Marx, Rhorvald 
Aylward, J. Mickelsen, M. D. 

Alfredsen. Andrew McDonald, Wm. 
Albers, Geo. Manson, Sven 

Anderson, Gust W. Merkle, G. 
Anderson, Julius L.Nass, John 
Bekker, Geo. Nelsen, Bernt 

Benter, Henry Nielsen, N. C. -544 

Bruin, B. de Nilsen, Andrew 

Bruce, Robert Naro, H. 

Bode, Fred Nase, A. Knudsen 

Bye, Sigurd Nielsen, H. J. 

Backman, A. Olsen, B. -597 

Campbell, Prank Olsen, E. -966 

D. M. Olson, C. 

Davis, F. A. Olsen, A. M. 

Doddy, C. W. Olsen, Martin 

Engstrom. Carl Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Eriksen, C. -872 Paulsen, G. L,. 
Erikson, Erik Petersen, S. A. 

Eriksen, John Preuss, F. -234 

Eriksen, E. Paaso, A. 

Fredrlksen. Harold Peltzon, Jacob 
GJelseth, I. Petterson, Harry 

Geiger, Joe Rasmussen, P. A. 

Gundersen, Peter Roche, John 
Graae. P. C. Rasmussen, Arthur 

Hansen, John Rlech, F. 

Hardcasle, W. Rlech, J. 

Hellisen, H. Rose, W^. H. 

Hemes, K. Samuelsen. Hugo 

Herman, Gus. Shepard, Peter 

Herman. Axel Sunde. Peter 

Hood, W. Schankat. Hans 

Hager, P. B. SImmlnghJem, G. 

Hansen, H. O. -315Saar, I. A. 
Hagger, F. W. Saunders, R. 

Jahnke, Otto Sheppard, Stewart 

Jensen. Hans -2062Skubber, H. 
Johnson, Julius Stover, Harry 

Jonson. Alfred Stuhr, H. 

Johansen, Arvid Sundberg, K. K. 

Johansen, Geo. W. Sund, K. A. 
Johnson. Hllmer Svensen. Ted 
Kalllo, F. Svery, Carl 

Kennidy, Tom Tiedeman, Joachim 

Krouss. Ernest Totz, R. 

Kri.stiansen, TrygveTahllnen, M. 
Kristlansen. K. F. Thorsen, Knut 
Knutsen, Knut Tahtl, HJalmar 

Kruger, J. Tomis. Frank 

T«irsen, Hans -1595 Toosen, Theo. 
T«-ibouple. J. P. Van l>oo. E. 
I-ar-sen. L. A. Wehde. F. 

Ljungstrom. Steen Wison. P. T<. 
Ijundberg, Jerry Wenikke, A. 
Lynn. C. Wold. Statlus 

Luwold, Nils Wettland, Johan 



«^^^^^S^/>^/>^^^V^^^WSAi/S^V>^V>^S««^%/S^V^'N^^t^ 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni, 
who has important news from home. 
.Address, Mrs. Minni Hall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

If Axel Olson and John Swanson, 
who in the autumn of 1902 were 
members of the crew of the steam- 
schooner "Fulton," will send their 
present addresses to John Gabrielson. 
Bellflower, Calif., they will receive 
news that will be of interest to them. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 
At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

( 220-222 1 

Two Stores ) 103-105-107 P^t Ave. So. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



EureKa, CaL 



^^^^^^^v/^/^|/^/v^'•^^wv^^s/v^^s^v^^^l's^vw^^s^/^ 



K. H. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

SEATTLE. WASH. 

Next door to Master Mates and Pilots 

Conducted by CAPT. H. S. SMITH, 

Who for four years was Assist. Ins. of 

Steamboats In Seattle 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Anderson, John Line, Wlktor 

Almkvist, Emil Melgall, M. 

Corty, Casar Murphy, Daniel 

Dobbin, Harry Nllsson, Teodor 

Doering, B. W. Nielsen, C. V. 

Englund, Gust E. Olsen, Martin E. 

Hansen, Johannes Paterson, John 

Iversen, Iver Pettersson, C. H. 
Johansson, Charles Voss, H. 
Johannsen, ChristlanWhermann, William 

Karthauser, Otto Wilbrandt, Harry 
Llnea, W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuana" in September, 
1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Kepeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Littra B. Nystrama St., Goteborg, 
Sweden.— 5-13-14. 

Carl Julius Carlson, born in Swe- 
den in 1877, is inquired for by his 
mother. There is about $2000 due 
him from his father's estate. Last 
heard of in September, 1902, on the 
Atlantic Coast. Previously sailed on 
the "Clifford" between St. Johns and 
New York. Address Fru Sophia 
Carlson, Klubbegard, Hallands Lan, 
Heberg, Sweden. 

Samuel Dickson, a seaman, aged 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Oscar Osolin, John Lind, M. 
Elone, John Anderson, Thomas Puk- 
ki, Alex. Tuominen, Chas. Grouberg, 
who were on board the steamer "Fi- 
fild" April 7, 1913, please communi- 
cate with the Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

Willy Blunel, a native of Germany, 
is inquired for by his uncle. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify W. Stieglitz. Central Hotel, 
Hoboken, N. J.— 9-30-14. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy S Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsaparlUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
r..ager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner P EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 

¥candjT1io1^ 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

A square~"meal 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms. Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 



Haldorsen, Adolf 
Ingebrethsen, Alfred 
Lawrence, Harry 
Lomas, Richard 
Thorssen, Fred'k. N. 



Ereksen, Anton 
Ellison, Sam 
Englund, Gust 
Hansen, Harald 
Hansen, Harry 
-1827 (Photo) 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Andrew Wilne, native of Dundee. 
Scotland; about 28 years of age, dark 
complexion, last heard of about nine 
years ago, sailing as steward, also 
as fireman, is inquired for by his 
relatives. Address A. S. Milne, 1122 
Rose street, Grandview, Vancouver, 
B. C. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson & 
Co. at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderharm, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 



mESBK 



ifi^i 



Jm 



SB 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



Portland, Ore. 
wlSTjOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Checlt for your baggage at Iiome. Give 
me your worlc or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel^Main8295^^ROSENSl^ 

Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 
FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, A. -1645 
Anderson, Gust. 

-1808 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Andersen, Mike 
Bergman, Karl W. 
Berglund, Ed. 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Brun, Mathias 
Bulls, Ernest 
Bakkersen, Peter J. 
Carlsen, J. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Carlson, C. Erland 
Campbell, Frank 
Dahl, Henry 
Deswert, William 
Day, Aca 
Danielsen, Nils J. 
Edstrom, John 
Brman, A. 
Ekham, Frans 
England, E. 
Freitag, Franz 
Fristrom, S. 
Geiger, Josef 
Gordla, Piet 
Gynther, John 
Gravier, Eugene 
Greil, Ben 
Hansen, Max O. 
Henriksson, William 
Hellman, Albin 
Henricks, Woldemar 
Hedlund, Albert 
Holm, Aage 
Huneig, Hans 
Hansen, H. F. C. C. 
Johansen, Chris 
Jansson, L. -2166 
Johansson, Arvo 
Jacobson, A. 



Karlson, August 
Kluge, Frank 
Kelly, Patric 
l^aine, Frank 
L,arsen, John 
Lewik, Karl 
L/utzen, Wald. 
Mathson, Nils 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Maass, R. 
Meckerman, Ernest 
Marx, Thorwald 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Moberg, Karl 
Nelssen, C. J. 
Nilsson, Axel 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Narberg, John 
Olsen, Arthur 
Olsen, Ansgar 
Olson, J. W. 
Olsen, John Andreas 
Phillip, Max 
Petterson, Einar 
Peterson, Hans 
Petersson, M. 
Pettersson, W. H. 
Pelz, Gottfried 
Pohland, Max 
Petersen, John 
Rautio, Jacob 
Reincke, Herman 
Rhodes, F. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Siniens, O. L. 
Scott, James 
Schulz, Alfred 
Wieprecht, Ernest 
Welsen, J. 
Walter, John 
Woldhouse, John 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, -1118 
Arnell, John 
Behn, Alfred 
Bowen, J. J. 
Butler, J. B. 
Bergman, L.. J. 
Christensen, Albert 
Carlstrom, John 
Debus, F. 
de Lange, Ingolf 
Doyle, W. 
Ernandes, Frisco 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Korde, S. C. 
Graf, Otto 
Gronros, Oswald 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Husche, H'y 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
Jacobson, Arthur 
Johansen, Hans 
Johansen, A. H. 
Jeutaft, Sigurd 
Kallas, Alek 
Kristiansen, -1093 
Koski, Chas. 
Kustel, V. J. 
Loining, Hermand 
Longtssen, Gottfried 
Dorsin, G. L. 
Larsen, Hans 
McLean, H. 
Martin, James 
Mackenzie, Hector 
G. 



Munsen, Fred 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nilsen, Alf. W. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsen, Oswald -1059 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olasen, Chas. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Pettersen, Olaf 
Peterson, Nels 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Roberts, I. 
Sim, Gunder 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Sormato, Matti 
Strom, C. 
Schultz 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Vilen, T. 
Walder, Olsen N. 
Zebe, G. V. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Solberg, Peter 
Stanners, W. S. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers* Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




•GI8TEW 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 



him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, age about 44, is en- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
'Francisco. Cal. 7-22-14 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front' 

When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 

Bassett News a Drug Co. 

Headquarters 

SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. WISKAH STREET, ABERDEEN 
SMOKE 

"ThinK of Me" and 
"White Squadron" 

C I G A R S 

Made by 

L. L. MALEY, Aberdeen, Wash. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Headquarters for 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

4201/2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS. 



LEADING JEWELERS 



Have Moved to 

318 E. HERON STREET 

Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

AB ERDE EN^^ - - WASHING'IW 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 
1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at San Francisco. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will -~i-.»cp communiacte with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, 
last hrard of at Melbouriie, Australia, 
is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 





Home 


N 


ews. 


1 



Mayor Oakley C. Curtis of Port- 
land, a Democrat, was elected Gov- 
ernor of Maine over Governor Wil- 
liam T. Haines, Republican, of Wa- 
terville, who was a candidate for a 
second term, by a margin of 2700 
votes. 

Everyone is asked to buy one bale 
of cotton and hold it until the war 
is over, when it is expected the 
price will be high. Among the first 
to purchase a bale was President 
Wilson, who bought a $50 bale from 
the Georgia "Buy-a-Bale-of-Cotton" 
Club. 

Governor Blease of South Caro- 
lina issued a call for a special ses- 
sion of the South Carolina Legisla- 
ture to meet on October 6 and deal 
with conditions in the cotton trade. 
The Governor's proclamation declares 
action is needed to prevent loss to 
the people of the State. 

This country is not only practically 
self-supporting, but possesses, in 
many lines, a large surplus available 
for protection against famine and 
temporary adversity, or for meeting 
exceptional demands from abroad, is 
the decision reached by the Depart- 
ment of Commerce after inquiry into 
the assets of the United States. 

Interference with communication 
caused by the European difficulties 
led the United States postoffice de- 
partment to announce that it cannot 
insure the correct or speedy payment 
of international money orders paya- 
ble in any European country until 
after the restoration of peace and 
normal conditions. Such business, it 
is added, will be accepted subject to 
delays and risks. 

Rev. Homer MacMillan of At- 
L'Uita, secretary of the executive 
committee of the Home Mission 
Board of the Presbyterian Church, 
South, laid before President Wil- 
son a plan for a memorial to Mrs. 
Wilson in the form of a fund for 
the education of mountain children 
of the South, a work in which Mrs. 
Wilson was deeply interested. The 
President interposed no objection. 

Secretary Lane has recently issued 
an order throwing 1,000,000 acres of 
land in Montana open to settlement 
under the enlarged homestead act. 
This action was taken upon the re- 
quest of about 230 settlers, and the 
land may be taken up in homesteads 
of 320 acres each. The local land 
offices will be promptly furnished 
with lists of lands and further in- 
formation may be obtained from 
them. 

The paid admissions to the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition since 
the gates were installed have been 
$101,000. The largest single day's 
admissions were 18,000 for the Ball 
of .'\11 Nations on May 2. The lar- 
gest attendance for a single day 
when there has been no program 
within the grounds was on August 
2, when 8250 persons paid admission, 
representing $2056. The average 
monthly attendance is now more 
than 50,000. 

The European war will not alter 
Italy's plans for participation in the 
Panama-Pacific International Expo- 
sition. President Charles C. Moore 
is in receipt of a telegram from 
Ernesto Nathan, Italian commis- 
sioner to the Exposition and former 
mayor of Rome, saying that work 
is to he begun at once on Italy's pa- 
vilion. The contractor for the Ital- 
ian pavilion has received word to 
proceed with construction. Italy's 
appropriation is $400,000. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Domestic and Naval. 



During the month of August, 1914, 
80 vessels of 21,477 tons gross were 
built in the United States, of which 
4 of 13,749 tons were steel steamers, 
as follows: Atlantic & Gulf, 2 of 
13.562; Great Lakes, 2 of 187 tons. 

The Kolnisclie Zeitung states that 
the Hamburg-American Line has or- 
dered from the Vulcan shipliuilding 
yard a sister ship to the "Konigin 
Luise," "which was lost in so hon- 
orable a manner at the mouth of 
the Thames." 

British shipowners are complain- 
ing of the extremely low values that 
they are forced to submit to in in- 
suring their vessels under the State 
insurance scheme. For instance, a 
vessel for which £12,000 had been 
refused, had to be entered at £3,500 
in the State insurance department, 
with the result that the owner will 
either have to insure the balance at 
Lloyd's or lay the vessel up until 
such times as he can trade with her 
without risk. 

The time for filing an answer to 
the libel and interrogatories in the 
suit of the Guaranty Trust Company 
of New York against the North Ger- 
man Lloyd steamship "Kronprinzes- 
sin Cecilie" for failure to deliver a 
large quantity of gold bullion in 
Europe, just before the European 
war began, has been extended until 
October 1. In the meantime the 
ship will remain in charge of a Fed- 
eral keeper at Bar Harbor, where 
she took refuge after failing to com- 
plete her transatlantic trip. 

Designs for the new destroyers 
Nos. 63, 64, 65, 66, 67 and 68 have i 
been approved by the Secretary of 
the Navy. Although these vessels 
will generally resemble those of the 
preceding type, they will have triple 
instead of twin torpedo tubes and 
are designed "to produce certain im- 
portant military characteristics de- 
sired by the General Board of the 
Navy." The invitation for bids on 
the construction of these vessels 
shows that the main characteristics 
of these vessels will be: Length,! 
310 ft.; beam, 29 ft. 10 in.; draft, 9 
ft, 6 in.; displ., 1,108 tons; arma- ' 
ment, four 4-in. R. F. guns and four 
triple torpedo tubes; machinery, 
steam turbines, oil fuel burning, wa- 
ter tube boilers. Bids will be opened 
by the Secretary of the Navy No- 
vember 10, 1914. I 
Judgment has been given by the 
Court of Inquiry appointed by the 
British Board of Trade on the loss 
of the Leyland liner "Columbian." 
The Court declared itself unable to 
determine the cause of the fire. The 
master and crew were justified in 
abandoning the vessel, and none of 
them was to blame for the loss of 
life which occurred. Some of the 
cargo on the vessel was specially 
dangerous to the ship, the cargo, and 
those on board. Barium peroxide, 
which formed part of the cargo, was 
if. the opinion of the Court of a 
dangerous nature within the mean- 
inT of the Merchant Shipping -Xct, 
1894. The evidence was that the 
'-nsVs and barrels of barium peroxide 
•■•f-e s'^owed in the ordinary way, 
pnd -ecitred from moving fore and 
pft bv bales of rags. They were 
•■'nt-ed in one tier, on a deck ren- 
('cred uneven by the existence of old 
■-Ttle battens and broken cement 
flf^orin7s. The Court was of opinion 
ihit unrler such circiunstances extra 
precautions should have been taken 
to prevent cargo of such nature 
shifting. 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

52 EAST STREET, Opp. Ferry Depot, San Francisco 
JOE WEISS Telephone Kearny 3771 

Union Made Shoes 

FOR MEN EXCLUSIVELY 

NEW STORE! NEW GOODS! 

NEW MACHINERY! 

Call and Inspect our new up-to-date quarters 

Repairing done while you wait by the latest machinery 

Work called for and delivered 

We use only the best leather market affords 

We can save you money by purchasing your next pair of shoes from us. 





Phone Douglas 198 



UNION LABEL USED 



NOVELTY TAILORING CO. 

Third Floor Phelan Building 
760 MARKET STREET 



WORKSHOP CUTTING DEPT. SALES DEPT. 

Room 325 Room 327 Room 329 

Represented by F. SELANDER, Assistant Secretary 



San Francisco Letter List, 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
1. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abrahamsen. Anton 
Adolfsson, F. H. 
Alberlson, Chris 
Albons, Arney 
Alexander, James 
Allen, James 
Amundsen, Albert 
Andersen, A. 
Andersen. Andrew 
Andersen. Arnfeldt 
Andfrrsen, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson. 



Anderson. Edvard 
Anderson, Emanuel 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson. Victor 
Andeisseii, II. -1477 
Ander.ssen. S. P. 
Andersson, A. -1819 
Andreassen. MorBiiii 
Andstrom. Ivar 
Antonsen, Herman 
Arnecke, Carl 
Attel, Alf 
Austin, Tom 

Blanco, D. 
Blanert, Willy 
Blocker. Joun 
Boers, M. 
Bohn. Franz 
Borgen, John 
Bowman, William G. 
Brander, William 
Bravlch, Johan 
Brennan, Patrick 
Brennet. Waldemar 
Broberg. C. 
Brushard. Ewalt 
Bryan. John 
Brynjulfson, Halvar 
Buse. D. 
Bye, Sigurd 
Bynum, Joe 

Carron, Edward 
Curry. Peter A 
Cherniawski. M. 
Cockell, Rrank 
Connolly. Steplien 
Costa, Casimiro 
Cord. P. 
Crosman. Geo. 
Pehler. .\lfred 
De Landtshier, John 
Ueswerl, Williiim 
Digman. Carl A. 
liracar. Eigardo 
Dreyer, Carl 

Elofson, John 
Elone, Emanual 
Erlcson. G. W. 
Erlcson, Gust. 
Eriksen. Bernhard 
Erikson. G. V. 
Erikson, -8S0 
Erikson, E. 
Eskildsen. Nils P. 
Fraser, Tliomas 
Frediksen, b. D. 
Freiberg, P. 
Fricke. W. 
French, Jack 



Nela 
A. -1344 
A. -1447 
Arthur 
E. -1781 

Baars, Hans 
Backman, Paul 
Bakkenson, P. J. 
Bakmyhr, Gustav 
Bang, Mauritz 
Bauer, Andrew 
Belir. H. 
Behrend, Frad 
Beimeir, Peter 
Bensen, Pick 
Benson, Gus 
Ben;?on, Severin 
Berg. Jotin 
Berghalm. Edward 
Bjorklund, Eric 
BJorkstrom, Artur 
Bjornsen. Conrad 
Bjorseth, Knut 

Callon, Josh. 
Campbell, D. C. 
Campbell. Geo. 
Cariera, Pete 
Carlson, A. A. 
Carlson, .tolin 
Carlson, Joseph 
Carlson, Walter 
Palen, Wm. K. 
Dallman, H. 
Uauhbs, Paul 
Pa vis. Frank A. 
Pa vis. Gala 
Debus. Fredrick 
De Bruin. B. 

Eaton. William H. 
Eby, Ivar. D. 
Eckhoff. Otto 
Edolf, K. 
Eggers, John 
Bhlert, Ernest 
Ekeledt. Harold 
Ellis, E. 
Ellsworth, James 

Fa men, M. S. 
Fiedler. Emit 
Fingerling. Bduard 
Finn. Chas. 
Fitzpatrick, P. 
Folvik. Lewis 

Gabrilsen, Edllng Grigoleit. Ed. 

I Gasch, William (Jrnnnpvlok. Isnck 

Glass. W. Gulbranson, Bjorn 

Gordon, Geo. Gundersen, Chas. 

Granstrom, Nestar Gustafson. Gus 

Gravit. Carl Gustavsen. Olaf 

Griffin, Jas. Gutman. Charles 



Haave. Norvald 
Mncear, Fred 
Hallen, Victor 
Hallenherg. Gustaf 
TTallowes, Louis N. 
Halvnrsen. H. 
HMlvorsen. Olaf 
Hamm-.irgren, Osc.^r 
"arik A. '•■ 
Hannus, Alex. 

Bernhard 

C. T. 

TT. P. 

Jerry 

J. -215G 

Olaf 

Oscar 

Thomas 
H'ln.snn. O. 
Harmening. Fred 
Hnseth. K. J. 
Hawkins, Fred 
Hnws. Arthur 
Heckel, Max 



Hansen 
Hansen. 
T^'ansen. 
Hansen, 
"nnsen. 
Hnnsen. 
"an.oen. 



Heldal, Trygve 
Helin, Aaana 
Helin. Paul 
Hellsten, Gus. 
Helpap. -Vugust 
'lenrv. H A. 
Hensen. J. 
Herman, Jack 
Hiks, Gustav 
Hilke. Karl 
Hogan. A. 
I'o-ohin'' ' ndrew 
llollen. Carl 
"o11ni-.n. M ■rCn 
ITolmlund. Arthur 
TTolm. Carl 
Holm, S. 
Hoist. R. 
Holtberg. Ernest 
••n.v'ne. H. J. 
Hultberg. Ernest 
Hubner. C. F. W. 
Hyde, Carl 



Ikivalko Isak.son. Kail 

Illig, Gus Iversen, Iver 

.lacobsep, John Johansen, Willy 

. 'f"; ^"' , , Johanson, Nathanael 

Jakobsen. Joakmi Johanson, Oscar E 

.Jaknhsen. Jakob Johanssen, Emil 

Jamisch. Ed W. Johansson. Johan 

.ens, Otto Johnsen, G. -950 

■Jensen. \... John.son, A. K 

Jensen, Fredrick .Inhnson. P 

Jensen. Hans Johnson E 

Jensen. Harry .Icjlinsoni F. 

.iensen. Just Johnson. Jack 

.lensen. Wlllinni Johnson. Jakob 

■Jespersen. Martin Johnsen, John A 

Johannesen, Einar Johnson John 

.iohansen. Alf. Jnlmson. Pete 

.lohannessen, Anton Johnson, Robert 

Johansen, Carl -804 Johnson, R W 

.lohan.=en. Ediiard Johnson, Steve 

Johansen, Johan Jokstad, Sigurd O 
Johansen, John -2309 Jones, Berthon 

Johansen. Louis Jorgensen, Aage 
Johansen, S. W. 

Kalber, Albin Kesber. Karl 

Kalkin, Fred Kellv, Edward 

Ivallio. Frans Kiesow. Paul 

Ivallberg, Arvid Kindlund. Otto 

Kallos. Alex. Ivlebingat. Fred 

Kalnin, E. Klette. Ernst 

K-alot, A. Knudsen. Lauritz 

Karsen. Fred Kohne. Ernsi 

Karlsen. Hans Konopacki. Martin 

Karlsen. Martin Kristiansen L P 

Karsten, Hugo B. Kroeger. Henry 

Kasen. Frudu Krutman, K. 

Kayser. C. T. Kuhlmann, Louis 
Keating. R. 

Lacy. Thos. E. Lawton, K. S. 

Lala, August Leckscher, Henry 
l.aponble, Jean P. -1684 

Lapschies. lOdwanl I,ee. Ernest 

l-arsen. A. L. T.ewis. Kov n 

Larsen, Alf Lindgren, Richard 

Larsen. Anton Line, W. 

Larsen. Georg L. Linhquisi. G. 

Larsen. T. Lohne. E. 

Larson, C. Loining, Herman 

L,arson. H. P. Lorense. W. 

Lass, Johan Love, S. C. 

Laws, Harry Lundblad, Ernst 

Macrae. Alexander Mayes, J. B. 

Makelor. Gustave McConnell. David 

Maksnes. Kristian McCort, Joe 

Malmstroin, C. A. McGregor, John 

Maltli. J. McKeating, R. 

.Manss. Fred McMnhon. J. T. 

Maidisnn. Andrew McMalo. Victor 

Markley. Paul Meyer, W. 

.Vlarknian. Harry Miller. Fred 
.Vlarkm.Hnn. Heinrich Miller, Heiiiian 

Markus, Gotfred Mogelberg. Harry 
Martenz. Paul -226L'Mohr. Ernst 

Martens, Paul Monsen, Martin 

Masters, C. Moore, C. C. 
Martensen. I. C.-2191 Morris, Benjamin 

Martens. H. -1S92 Morris, Oscar R. 

Mathisen, Charley Morrison, Wm. 

Mathisen. Christian Moure, Peter 

Mathiesen. Ludvig Mueller, A. R. 

Mathsen. Olaf Muddn. A. 

Matson, Hennlng Murray, C. P. 
Matta, John 

Nar. P. Niels Nilson. Ragnard 

Narup, Carl Nilsson, -1141 

Nelsen. Ernest C. Nordin, Gus 

Nelson. John Nordstrom. Wictor 

Nelson. C. Novomiroff. M. 

Nelson. W. Nurhanan, I. 

Nerby. Kristian Nurken. H. 

Neumann. J. Nurml. Victor R. 

Nielsen, Carl Nylander, Edv. R. 

Vielsen. Ingolf Nyman. A. 

Xielsen, L. Nyman, Oskar 

Oberg. C. W. Olsen. O. -1283 

Oberg. Mauris Olsen, Otto 

O'Connor. W. F. Olsen, Oswald 

Olafsson. Melchoir Olson. M. 

Olmann, P. Olson. Marius 

Olsen. Alfred Olson. S. 

Olsen, Charles Olson, Sam 

'^l=en. Ferdinand Olsson. G. n 

Olsen. Geo. Olsson. M. -.102 

Olson. Geo. W. Ondrasek. Ralph 

f)lson, Gus O'NpII. .Tames 

Olsen. Harry Osalin. Oscar 

Olsen, Jens Osterman, Oscar 

Olsen. M. E. Ovarnstrom, H. 
Olsen. Olaf 

Palm. A. Peters. J. 

Palmer. P Petersen. -l^Rl 

Parrell. William 'Petersen. .Tnhn * 

Partaner. Johan Petersen. Karl -1.59S 

Paulsen. Alex Petersen, Otto 
P<iullin. Martin Petersen. ,«. A- 

Pearson. Victor Peterson, C. -1901 

Pedersen. C^r\ Peterson, C. 

Pedersen. Elllf Peterson, Johan 

Perlersen. Hans Peterson. Soren 
Pederson. Sofus R. Pptter.«en. F .1'"K 

Pera, Gust Pettersson, E. -1437 



Pettersson, Oscar Prannels, W. 

-1551 Prinz, Carl 

Petz, Fritz Publicatus, August 

Pillson. Eduard Puze, A. 
Poratli, Ben 

Kaalsen, Fred Rimmer, Chas. 

Ramberg. B. A. Robinsboom. E. 

Kusmuston, John Rosenblad, Axel 

Itaymond, Frank L. Rosendahl, Knud 

Regan. .John Rosenfeild, A. 

Reine, G. Rosenquist, A. 

Ren vail, A. Rulse, — 

Ukhardson. B. O. Rutte. Peter 

Rlchter, Niels Ryersen, Geo. 

Saarinen, Werner Smith. D. 

Sager. Ed. Smith. Percy S. 

Salger, Julius Sogren. John 

Salvesen, S. Sonnenberg, J. C. 

Sancherd. Vincent Sorby, Olaf 

Sander, Robert Sorensen. C. J. T. G. 

Sandsepp. O. Sorensen, James 

Sandseter. Paul .Sorensen, Peter 

Sandstrom, O. H . Sorensen. Soren 

.Sanlos. Ben Spooner. Emil 

Scheffler. Samuel Staff. Andreas 

Schmidt, Berhard Stallbaum. Eberhard 

Schmidt, Ernest R. Stein, Emil 

Schultz, Albert Stenberg, Alfred 

Schultz. F. J. Sterling, H. 

Schulze, Paul Strom. Kahl 

S.olt, Emil Swansen. O. 

Seagreen, C. Swanson. Jack 

.Seidel. Willi Swanson, John 

Seiffert. Johannes Swansson, Oskar 

Shaffer. H. Swartley. Norman 

^liMllgreen, John .Sund. Aleks 

Shem, A. Sundl, Oscar 

Sherry. J. H. Sundberg, K. K. 

Shields. J. J. Sundharm. Fred 

Slenning. Joseph Sweeting. .1. B. 

Sinalmberg, Otto Svensson, S. E. -2675 

'lamman, Krispln Thompson. Thomas 

Tasnase. E. Thoren, Gus 

I Tho. Johan Thoren, Wiktor 

Thomas. Edward Torvik. Olaf 

I Thompson, E. Tuchel. Gustav 
Thompson. Theodore 

I'dekull, C. Ulla. Die. O. 

Uhlman, Axel Ulmar, John 

^'ande^berg. Geo. Verfard. Frank 
\'an Katwijk. J. W.Voorhies, Finnan 
\"elson. Frank 

Wagner. W. Westman. A. 

Wahi. J. Weyer. Paul 

Wallgren. I. M. Wiback. Walter 

Walsh, B. Wirkstrom. Antone 

•^Vjinderlid. J. Willert. Charles 

Welson. R. Wilsen, Billy 

Weltz. Helle Wilson. James 

Welure. J. Wimmer. Geo. 

\\ernei-. Pan' Winblad. Martin 

Westgaard, John Wortman, Wm. 

7.aiikprt. Karl Zoerb. Walter 

Zechel. Walter Zornig, Harry 
Zimmerling, Fred 

PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Anderson, A. Laydon. D. 

.Anderson, Andrew I-undberg, Oskar 

Anderson. Axel Mehrtens, H. K. 
Athanasele, DemetreMiles, I. P. 

J 'cling. Oscar Olsen, Arne 

Bode. W. V. Olsen, Carl -1101 

Carter. H. Olsen. W. S. -1229 

Ceelan. John Raasch. O. 

Clirfstoffersen, Olaf Rarly, Frans. 

Ellefsen. Otto Rasmu.ssen. Emil 

Eriekson, F. Rathke, Reinhoid 

Finnclly. \S'm. Relursen. A. T^. 

O.jarth. Petrus Roslin, Robeit 

Hansen, Karl Sander, R. 

Hansen. Marius Schroder, Aug. 

Hendriksen, Hag- Skellerey, A. 

hart Sorensen, Pete 

.lo'iansen, Emil Summers. J. J. 

Johnson, R. W. Thorsen, Jens 

.lorgensen. Oluv Wakely, R. E. 

Klette, E. F. Walters. .-Mbprt B. 

Laas, J. Wurthman, W. L. 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

.\pply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clay St. 

TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET, near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLrSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
York, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name. 200 Fair Oaks 
ave.. Pasadena. Cal. 7-29-14 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Tournal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



s. 



iOSSB 



JSm 



■s#-> nv^f 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere street. 

June 30, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

OfHce Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

For the six months ending June 30, 
1914, a dividend to depositors of 4% per 
annum was declared. 

Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



0. EDWARDS & SONS 

QNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 



HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 

Phone Garfield 7833 E. Benvenuti, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: .25, .30 
and .50 per day. $1.25 per Week and 
up. Special rates for Housekeeping, 

Single or Connecting Rooms. 
This Place Must Be Seen to Be Appre- 
ciated. Nothing Like It in the City. 

1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - ' SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washing'ton 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 



^ f'"*'»i"^ »i^s 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




\ 
"kle 

AND 

Porter 



«T.45^ Of America r^c^ 

COPYRIGHT aTRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^r» m /f ^"-y g^y^ l — ? T~^ ^^ See that this label (in light 

4^^ l\/M fL 9 f^ ITj- I'^ ^^ blue) appears on the box in 



, .. ■ ... .fstpusao^ ^ 

U&ued by Auiftontyof uie Ciga/ MaKe/s' \meti\aUowl Union of America 

Union-made Cigars 

Wu$ ^tliiblf. TM thi a^n mauni hlMs toi bm bsn mM by • nCtQCS HUkU 
i wmitf or rHC aCW UMEIO 'linUIIUTIcmU. UWON <t Amtki. a orunzaboa devotei) h> It* ad' 
««ictiitnl of tilt H0flAlJiUn[5IAlj«l mimiOlWi WIUAM Of m CRArt n«uto»««r rn — ri< 
tlwM Ci44n to 111 yiKAfln ttifOMhout th« MOfU 
Jl lifni^tMU iWB tliu UtaJ •« be punubail jcoir^ tDlat 



'•• SIMILE 



V CU/Mtf 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

M. WiCKS 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

60 STEUART STREET 

San Francisco 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 

DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 5390 

ANCHOR HOUSE 

S. PETERSON, Prop. 

495 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

J. MILLER 
Seamen's Outfitter 
Union Made Goods 

General Merchandise 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

REO SEAL CISAR 

UNION MADE 



RED SEAL CIGAR CO., NANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 




Clear Havana Cigars 
of Highest Type 

UNION MADE 

ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Albertsen, Hans 

Christian 
Andersen, E. W. 
Andersen, Gus 
Boers, J. G. 
Bloom, A. A. 
Bernhard, Oscar 
Colbert, M. J. 
Cohn. W. R. 
Ericksen, Earl 
Ericksen, O. E. 
P'indlay, J. 
H;ins. Nick 
Memo, Fred 
Ilallcn, Victor 
Happmer, H. 



Jacona, Carmelo 
Janssan, Axel 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson, John E. 
Kathy, Albert 
Lundquist, Fritz 
Magnussen, Magnus 
Nieman, August 
Olson, John 
Orabrovae 
Petersen, Chas. F. 
Roelfs, J. 
Roelfs, J. 
Rinta, Carl 
Schultz, F. J. 
Wallen, E. 



Seattle, Wash. 



Suits Steam-Cleaned $1.50 
I'honc .Sutler 767 124 EAST ST. 



AboUn, Adam 
Borgen, K. Sigurd 

sen 
Dahl, Ben. 
Fister, Johannes 
Flnnlgan, I. H. 
Hagen, Gunder 
Jensen, Gustav 
Johan.sen, Ingvald 
Johnson, Axel 
Nelson, Nels Wll- 

helm 
Larsen, Fred 
Magnuson, P. A. 



Osterlund, Albert 
Olsson, Sigfrld 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phlster, Albert 
Polhome, Mr. 
Rldderstaff. Ernest 
Rye, F. M. J. 
Selback. Chris. 
Sllnnlnjr. Rasmus O. 
Spollman, Tom 
Starks, John 
Stein, George O. 
Stixrud. Jack 
Stromsness, Oscar 



News from Abroad. 



Fn June 8000 immigrants arrived in 
Argentina and 28,000 emigrants left. 
In May 9000 entered and 24,000 left. 
Others would leave if they could. 

The Swedish Riksdag has ap- 
proved a proposition from a Gov- 
ernment committee to grant 500,000 
crowns ($134,000) as pecuniary as- 
sistance toward building a floating 
dock at Goteborg, 

Following a violent discussion over 
the subject of the attitude of Tur- 
key, Enver Pasha, minister of war, 
fired two shots at the crown prince 
of Turkey. The prince returned the 
fire, killing the war minister. 

Japan's attempt to gain a strong 
foothold in Lower California failed 
ulien the new Mexican Government, 
tlirough its Los Angeles consul, 
Adolfo Carrillo, refused a syndicate 
of wealthy Japanese rich land and 
pearl concessions sold to them by 
ex-Dictator Huerta. This action 
came as a climax to a series of ne- 
gotiations said to have been carried 
on between Huerta and Japan. The 
Japanese, Carillo said, already are in 
possession of a large number of 
valuable concessions in Lower Cali- 
fnrnia, which will be taken from 
tlieni. 

The crews of the six British 
^teamers captured by the German 
cruiser "Emden" in the Bay of 
I'engal, five of which were sunk 
after the crews had been taken off, 
have arrived at Calcutta. George 
Read, second officer of the "Indus," 
says his ship was sunk on the morn- 
ing of September 10 Iiy the "Emden" 
as she was coming up the bay. The 
Germans had intercepted all wireless 
reporting the movement of ships, and 
so knew the position of all the ves- 
sels in the bay. The next afternoon 
tile British ship "Lovat" was sighted 
by the "Emden" and the same pro- 
gram was followed in her case, the 
crew being transferred and the vessel 
sunk. On the night of the 12th the 
"Katinga" was sighted and an armed 
crew placed aboard her. Two hours 
later tlie "Killin" was captured and 
an armed crew took possession of 
her. Tlie crew placed aboard the 
"Killin" was removed in the morn- 
ing and she also was sunk. 

The silence of the British authori- 
ties regarding naval operations in 
the North Sea was suddenly broken 
by the announcement of a disaster 
to the British Navy, which, accord- 
ing to official information, has suf- 
fered the loss f)f three armored 
cruisers, sunk by German subma- 
rines. Tlie \ictinis of tliis brilliant 
stroke on the part of the German 
fleet were the "Cressy," the "Abou- 
kir" and "Hogue," sister ships. The 
loss of life among the crews of these 
vessels probably will be heavy, al- 
though a considerable number of 
men were picked up by the cruiser 
"Lowestoft," a division of torpedo 
boat destroyers and some trawlers. 
The warshii)s "Aboukir," "Hogue" 
and "Cressy" are cruisers of the 
same tyi)e. Their tonnage, arma- 
ment, etc., are identical. These ves- 
sels had a displacement of 12,000 
tons, were 440 ft. long, 69.3 ft. wide 
and drew 26 ft. of water. Each one 
had a complement of 755 men, in- 
cluding officers and crew. These 
Ihrec cruisers had armaments con- 
sisting of two 9.2-inch guns, twelve 
fi-inch guns, twelve 12-pounders and 
fixe 3-pounders. The "Aboukir" and 
the "Cressy" were built at Govan in 
1900, and the "Hogue" was built at 
Barrow the same year. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"What test would you apply to men 
seeking positions as waiters?" 

"I would select those of fetching 
ways." 



"What did you get?" said the first 
burglar as his pal came out of the 
window. 

"Nowthin'," said the second burg- 
lar. "Dis is a lawyer's house." 

"You still got yer tools, ain't you?" 
anxiously inquired the first burglar. 

"What are you going to do when 
you get home?" 

"I don't know yet," replied Senator 
Sorghum. "I've got to wait and see 
whether my reception by the town 
folks is in the nature of an ovation 
or the third degree." 



"My dear," he said, "you are su- 
perb! To any man a credit. You'll 
be the reigning belle tonight," and 
kissed her as he said it. 

"My love, I'm glad you like my 
clothes," with beating heart she said 
it. "Because this party gown and 
wrap are also to your credit!" 



.'\n angry mother had her little 
son by the hand and held a men- 
acing cane. 

"I'll teach you to tie a kettle to 
the cat's tail!" she said. 

"It wasn't our cat," said the boy. 

"No, it wasn't, but it was our 
kettle," said the mother. 



What is greater than the friend- 
ship that exists among men? 

The young Alameda man had care- 
fully explained that he must go to 
San Jose, but declared that he would 
surely be back for 7 o'clock dinner, 
as usual. He didn't return as per 
schedule. The hours dragged by and 
wife became anxious. Finally she 
telegraphed to six of her husband's 
friends in San Jose, asking them if 
the missing man was there. 

With the dawn came a farmer's 
wagon dragging in a broken-down 
automobile and the husband. Almost 
at the same moment, a messenger 
boy arrived with six telegrams, and 
all of them read: 

"Yes. Walter is passing the night 
with me." 



An Invitation 

We invite deposits from every one — 
ricti, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no cla.sses. but treat large and 
-•mall depo.sltors witti the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
p.ast have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING CO. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




'^— "ImniisniiKM. ■ LjIVIOIV 

UI(IQ1«-| 

"^^.^fSSiJi MADE 





YOU Can Start a 

Bank Account 

With Only 

51c. 



You don't 
need one dollar 
to start a bank 
account when 
you have one 
of HALE'S Sa- 
vings Banks. 
It takes but 
50c to purchase 
one of our com- 
pact little $1.00 
Banks, and one 
cent starts the 
account. 

Your savings will be Just as safe 
from the temptation to open it on 
a moment's Impulse as In a Savings 
Bank, because each Bank Is fitted 
with a patented lock, the key to 
which we keep. That Is the BIG 
FEATURE of these Banks. We will 
open it at any time upon presenta- 
tion at Transfer Desk — Main Floor — 
you do what you please with the 
money. 

'I'hese Banks are made of tempered 
stoel. with neat oxidized copper finish. 
Inquire at Transfer Desk — Main 
Floor. 





Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
72 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 






ONE BIG STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

.Jewelers, WatchmaKers, Opticians 

No purchase too small to be appreciated. To prove this, we sell: 

ALARM CLOCKS, 45c UP WATCHES, $1.00 UP 

EYE GLASSES, 50c UP 



H. SAMIEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

0pp. S. p. Depot at Third & Tovifnsend 

Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



CJlflBUSFtU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



SI 






FOR TJiE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVIII, No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1914. 



Whole No. 2298. 



ORGANIZATIO N IS L ABOR'S HOPE. 

College Professors So Declare in "American Federationist's" Symposium. 



I 



"Organization the means of Progress for 
Humanity." By Robert F. Hoxie, Professor of 
Political Economy, University of Chicago. 

Since the dawn of civilization the fate of the 
downtrodden has depended upon two great 
factors — organization and leadership. Down 
tlirough the ages until we reach a time within 
the memory of men now living, the workers 
were, with rare and fleeting exceptions, organized 
by the men of the privileged orders and led 
only by their masters, — first the slave masters, 
then the nobles and clergy, and finally the 
owners of the material means of production. 
The work was theirs but not the product; 
obedience was theirs but not the making of the 
law; they fought the wars but for the rights 
and privileges of others; theirs was the dignity 
of labor but not the dignity of life. In poverty 
and dishonor they, the many, gave their sweat 
and blood, their wives and children to purchase 
leisure and luxury for the few who were in- 
trenched in the power of organization and the 
arts of leadership. 

But gradually through their bitter experience 
the workers were taught the two great lessons 
of life: that the primal rights of man and the 
decencies of life — labor with dignity, health and 
safety, the comfortable home, the sheltered and 
unbroken family circle, education and recreation 
— are not automatic rewards of the good and 
meritorious individual, are not let down from 
heaven or the state, but must be wrung from 
privilege and interest, and, secondly, that in 
the struggle for these things the individual is 
nothing — the group is all. For what power has 
the individual against the state, and what force 
the one worker against the master of hundreds 
or thousands? 

Then began the organization of the workers 
for the workers, and so dawned a new era 
of hope and betterment for the men of Labor. 
But for long the new struggle was almost 
fruitless. The lesson had not been all learned. 
Organization alone, it was found, could effect 
little cither under the rule of legal restriction 
or the freedom of competition and bargaining. 
Under the former working group was pitted 
against working group, and the restrictions made 
in the past for the benefit of the privileged 
stood; under the latter, the toilers, tied to the 
bench and sunk in the mine, were no match for 
the men of the market-place and their wily 
representatives of their own, trained leadership 
representatives of heir own, trained leadership 
drawn from the men of toil, the workers were 
still helpless. Men they needed who had 
suffered with them, men of force and experience 
who had learned the intricacies and subtleties of 
trade and jjolitics, to unify the workers' view- 
point, to unite the scattered organic groups, 
who could meet craft with craft, special knowl- 
edge with special knowledge, and, backed by the 
solid array of millions of united men could 
defy the threat of force and the unjust manipula- 
tion of the law. 

It is the proudest boast of Labor and the 
greatest cause for cheer that out of this need 
and stress such leaders arose that in the main 
they have proved true to their comrades and 



the cause, and that the rank and file under 
their guidance are fast learning the lessons of 
solidarity, discipline, and the necessity of good 
leadership. 

To-day, as in the past, organization and leader- 
ship rule the world. But to-day, as never before, 
we behold organization and leadership of the 
workers, by the workers, and for the workers. 
Of the outcome there can be no doubt. No 
longer is the organized worker a slave to the 
whim of the master, dependent for his bread 
upon subserviency under driving and insult, but 
a man dignified by the consciousness of rights 
recognized and sustained, for he has practically 
won already a right to his job, a living wage, 
a modicum of leisure and universal education for 
his children, and he has won to the point where 
the master in his last resort dare no longer 
manipulate the law to sustain his unjust claims 
and privileges. 

It needs now no prophetic eye to see the 
time not far distant when autocracy shall have 
been driven from its last stand; when democracy 
in government and industry shall prevail; when 
dignity, security, and comfort shall be the lot 
of all who toil; when organized labor shall have 
completely triumphed. 



'"Progress in Collective Bargaining." By 
Henry R. Seager, Professor of Political Econo- 
my, Columbia University. 

The organized workers of the United States 
are surely to be congratulated on the progress 
made during the last year. The very violence 
of some of the labor struggles that have oc- 
curred has served to call nation-wide attention 
to the deplorable conditions in the mining, tex- 
tile, and other industries and to increase the 
public understanding of and sympathy with 
organized labor's demands and aspirations. Leg- 
islation pending in Congress promises, to regis- 
ter this better understanding and wider sym- 
pathy in laws that recognize the proper dis- 
tinction between combinations of wage-earners 
and of employers concerned with their mutual 
relations and combinations of producers aiming 
to take advantage of scattered and unorganized 
consumers. 

This progress brings with it new problems and 
new responsibilities. Public opinion is still 
wavering in reference to the wisdom of permit- 
ting organized labor to oppose its full strength, 
whether through the strike or the boycott, to 
the resistance of employers to its demands for 
better conditions, and the ultimate decision will 
hinge largely on the use made of new rights 
as they are acquired. Some of the circumstances 
that may hasten or retard tlie spread of col- 
lective bargaining arc specially worthy of con- 
sideration. 

The correlative of the closed shop, nr better 
the preferential shop, is the open union. All 
thoughtful wage-earners must set their faces 
scpiarely against union regulations or policies 
which prevent competent and upright workers 
from obtaining admission to labor organizations 
on fair and et|ual terms. Such regulations make 
the closed shop an engine of oppression instead 
of a means of emancipation and rally the <1is- 



interested public to the side of employers in 
opposition to it. 

In formulating demands upon employers due 
consideration must be given to the requirements 
of efficient production. Much sentimental non- 
sense has been spoken and written about "the 
identity of the interests of labor and capital." 
Nevertheless every intelligent worker knows that 
his wages as well as the profits of the em- 
ployer can be secured only as the result of suc- 
cessful industry. The more highly machinery 
for collective bargaining is developed and the 
more completely oppressive monopolies are 
brought under control, either through com- 
petition or through government regulation, the 
greater will be the obligation resting on wage- 
earners to consider the public interest in ef- 
ficient and ample production as well as their 
own interests in higher pay and shorter hours. 
Many restrictions on output are fully justified 
as means of protecting workers from too inten- 
sive or too prolonged effort. Others result in 
sheer waste which must, in the long run, injure 
wage-earners as well as their employers and the 
community. Efficient production and the avoid- 
ance of needless wastes, as well as better condi- 
tions of employment, must be aims of the high- 
minded wage-earner if he is to enjoy the sympa- 
thy and command the respect of the public in 
his efforts to improve his condition. 

The extension of machinery for collective 
bargaining should be accompanied by a more 
frequent resort to conciliation and arbitration 
as substitutes for strikes and lockouts. Public 
boards of conciliation and arbitration to be 
efficient must be non-partisan. 

Present conditions are disheartening enough, 
but with organized labor free to use its growing 
strength to improve labor conditions, with labor 
unions open to all competent workers and more 
and more truly representative of the interests 
of Labor as a whole, with wage-earners them- 
selves mindful of our common dependence for 
our well-being upon efficient production and the 
avoidance of wastes, and with boards of con- 
ciliation and arbitration representing fairly the 
pul)lic and employers as well as the workers and 
thus commanding the conlidcnce of all of the 
parties to labor disputes, is it not reasonable . 
to expect rapid progress in the future? This 
is the hope which reconciles many of us to 
conditions which without it would seem intoler- 
able. 



"ICffcctive Organization Is Practical." By 
Jeremiah W. Jenks, Professor of Political 
Economy, New York University .School of Com- 
merce. Accounts and Finance. 

I'erhaps there is no better way to test the 
degree of civilization of a country than to note 
the standard of living of the wage-earners. The 
wages upon which this standard of living must 
be based are determined to a very great degree 
by the productivity of the workers themselves. 
The larger the i)roduct th more there is to 
,li\ide. It is dei)endent, however, also in part 
upon the way in which the returns from the 
product are divided. This brings about always a 
riv;dry of interest between employer and work- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



men. However, fortunately, as society becoines 
more enlightened and both classes become better 
trained, this conflict is gradually being les.scnefl 
in bitterness by methods of friendly negotiationN, 
through collective bargaining and other similar 
means. 

It is also gratifying to note that as the years 
go by the standard of living of the wage-earners 
is steadily rising. The facts sliow beyond much 
doubt that in the United States, at any rate, 
among the skilled workers, the ability to secure 
articles of comfort and enjoyment has at least 
doubled during the last fifty years. This steady 
improvement in the standard of living of the 
wage-earners has been due. in my judgment, in 
no small degree to the acts of the trade unions 
in steadily demanding a reasonable share of the 
product of in<lustry and in enforcing their de- 
mands by argument, by the education of pulilic 
opinion, by strikes if need be. The wage- earners 
are to be heartily congratulated upon the leader- 
ship which has enabled them thus to secure 
better wages, l)etter conditions of work, greater 
comfort in living, better means of improving 
themselves and their children. 

The wage-earners should see to it in conse- 
quence that they choose and retain leaders who 
are cool of head, able to present their case, 
men of character who can be trusted. They 
should likewise, when they have such men. be 
ready to give them their confidence and follow 
their leadership. More than once I have been 
in the midst of a strike, in a position to know 
well existing conditions, and to see intimately 
the positions of both parties to the conflict 
and the motives influencing them. On more 
than one occasion I have seen a victory won 
by the cool-headed labor leaders (who, as a 
rule, are more e.xperienced and more skillful in 
leading a conflict than are the employers) and 
then have seen that contest lost because the 
rank and file, not knowing existing conditions, 
maddened by reckless agitators, have insisted 
upon demands that were unreasonable, often 
impossible, and have refused to follow the 
union leadership. 

Such cases ought not to arise. The wage- 
earners by following wise leadership have gained 
greatl)-. By choosing and sui)porting the leaders 
wMio are conservative and wise, while indefatig- 
able in their efforts to gain all that is possible 
and just, they will advance their cause far more 
rapidly than by letting themselves be misled 
by agitators who are shouting for the unattain- 
able. The cause of the w-age-earners is ad- 
vancing. The outlook is cheering. Let the good 
work go on. 



EIGHT-HOUR DAY PRIMERS. 

I!y TilO.M.VS W. W ILLl.A.MS. 



JOHN BURNS, ANTI-MILITARIST. 



John Burns, of Battersea. has been called 
more hard names by Socialists and Labor 
men than any other person in Great Brit- 
ain. Judas and apostate were comparative- 
ly mild terms to heave at the head of the 
one-time Social Democrat who accepted 
l)!ace and pelf at the hands of a Liberal 
Government. 

Burns, however, has, despite all that he 
may have done in the way of repudiating 
his revolutionary ideas, shown that he still 
possesses principles that are to him of 
greater value than the sweets of office. 
He is an ardent anti-militarist, and as a 
member of the British Cabinet refused to 
agree to the jingoism of some of his col- 
leagues. In this connection his action has 
the value of consistency. 

It will, no doubt, be remembered that 
during the Boer War Burns was a pro- 
nounced and outspoken pro-Boer, and be- 
cause of his anti-jingoistic attitude Bat- 
tersea admirers hurled bouquets in the 
shape of half and whole bricks, blue metal 
and what not through his windows. The 
impulsive British elector awakened to the 
fact one foggy morning that John was 
right. A similar awakening is inevitable 
again. — Maoriland Worker. 



As a result of the war. fifty papers in 
Great Britain devoted to trades or to .sports 
have suspended publication. Evidently 
there is something worse in war-time than 
a censorship. — New York World. 



Congressman Maim, Republican leader, 
in a speech delivered in the House, De- 
cember 11, 1911, said: 

"If I had my way about it, I would forbid 
any person employing labor for more than eight 
hours in twenty-four. We will gradually come 
to that." 

President William McKinley said in the 

year 1890: 

"This eight-hour legislation has been promised 
to the ear and broken to the hope of the labor- 
ing men of the country long enough. The trend 
of the nations of the w'orld is toward a shorten- 
ing of the workday; first, in the interests of 
health; second, in the interests of humanity; 
third, in the interests of the home and family." 

Ira Stewart said : 

"Machinery is discharging laborers faster than 
new employments are provided. Machinery must 
not be stopped, and tramps must not be in- 
creased." 

Commander Folger, Chief of the Bureau 

of Ordnance, said : 

"If you could, by fiat, say that every man in 
the land should work but eight hours, it would 
be a very good thing to do. The quality of the 
work would compensate for the difference in 
hours." 

.Again : 

"The efifort to get more than a certain 
amount of work out of a man defeats itself. 
If an increase in quantity always at expense of 
(|uality. The speed of the work lessens as the 
day advances." 

Josephine Goldmark reports: 

"A reduction in hours has never lessened the 
working people's ability to compete in the 
markets of the world. States with shorter 
workdays actually manufacture their products at 
a lower cost than States with longer work- 
days." (Fatigue and Efliciency, page 173.) 

Dr. Charles B. Steinmetz, one of the lead- 
ing electrical scientists of the world, states : 

"The man who works in a shop eight hours a 
day to-day works longer than the man who 
worked twelve or fourteen hours years ago." 

Samuel Gompers : 

"Compare anj- two or more countries on the 
face of the globe; compare any two States in the 
United States; compare any two cities in any 
one or more States; compare any two industries 
in any one city; yes. compare any two establish- 
ments of a similar industry in any one city, 
and there is no departure from this rule, that 
the longer the hours of daily labor the lower 
the wages, and vice versa." 

Professor Clark of Columbia University 

sums up the question for the employer of 

labor very truthfully in these words: 

"If you want to get a man to work for you 
one day, and one day only, and secure the 
greatest possible amount of work which he is 
capable of performing, you must make him work 
twenty-four hours; if you would have him 
work a week, it will be necessary to reduce the 
time to twenty hours a day; if you want him 
to work for a month, a still further reduction 
to eighteen hours a day; for the year, tiftecn 
hours a day will do; for several years, ten hours, 
but if you wish to get the most out of a man for 
a working lifetime, you will have to reduce his 
hours of labor to eight each day." 

"We know of no reason why, if a reduction of 
the hours of labor infallibly leads to an increased 
production of wealth, the conditions of the race 
should not be sufficiently improved by the gen- 
eral cessation of tiresome exertion." Xew York 
Post. May 1, 1886.) 

"In this country and in Kngland, where the 
concentration of capital is the greatest in the 
world, the productive capacity per capita is 
nearly two and one-half times that of the average 
in continental countries." (Gunton's Wealth 
and Progress, page 9.) 



TRIBUTE TO LABOR. 



Uruguay, much of which formerly was 
treeless, within a few years has planted 
more than 1 7,000 ,0(X) forest trees. 



More recent investigations indicate that 
the graphite deposits in the vicinity of 
Passau, Bavaria, may be a source of great 
wealth to the country, and also one of the 
main graphite supplies of the world. Pas- 
sau is a picturesque town, situated on a 
tongue of land formed by the confluence of 
the Danube and the Inn rivers. It lies near 
the .\ustrian border and owes its impor- 
tance to the Danube navigation. Pa.ssau 
grajihite has been utilized for several cen- 
tui:ics and crucibles made of it were used 
by the alchemists of the middle ages. 



file Toronto "Globe," tiie most influential 
Liberal newspaper in Canada, demands that 
both i)olitical parties in the Dominion shall 
clean house. It alludes to the recent scandals 
in the Ontario and Quebec Legislatures, and 
the (irand Trunk Pacific Railway revelations, 
and the latest scandal — the diversion of the 
funds of the Trent Canal for political pur- 
lioscs. It declares that the whole tone of 
public life in Canada is at a low point, and 
it is neces.sary that some stand be taken 
unless Canadian politics are to decline to the 
level of those of the L^nited States. 

Let's see. In Canadian politics and also 
in those of the United States there is no 
Labor party exercising any influence in the 
legislatures. Can you see the connection? 
In Canada Boodledom rules absolutely un- 
challenged. There are two sections calling 
themselves Liberals and Conservatives, but 
they are essentially the same. 

In the United States there are similar con- 
ditions except that the labels of the sections 
are different. There they call themselves 
Democrats and Republicans. They agree to 
differ in tariff matters, by way of a big 
bluff, but practically they are one. 

Here we have the Toronto "Globe." the 
premier Canadian newspaper, in a moment of 
unguarded exasi)eration, admitting that the 
conditions of public affairs in that country 
are of a reeking description, yet still it is 
able to draw some degree of consolation from 
the fact that they are not yet quite so bad as 
in the United States. 

Scarcely could a finer tribute to the purify- 
ing influence of the Labor movement be 
l)ai(l than these admissions that in those coun- 
tries where it has not yet been able to exert 
any legislative weight the corruption and 
political contamination are so ptitrid that they 
positively smell to heaven. 

Surely a mind that cannot perceive the 
connection between these two circumstances 
is hopelessly obtuse or wilfully blind ! 

We could fill a volume with instances 
of the excellences which have followed in 
the wake of Labor's legislative influence, but 
it is doubtful if it would be half so effective 
as the simple indication of the low level 
of public morality coupled with the high 
level of corrupting graft that exists in those 
countries wherein the movement has as 
yet attained no political power. — Brisbane 
( (Jueensland) Worker. 



.Among the Buriats and Yakuts of East- 
ern Siberia the almost general rule of de- 
cline and decay has failed to make good. 
\\ bile practically all other far northern 
tribes are dying out, here are two which, 
since 1857, have increased steadily. The 
coming of white men has been a benefit 
to them, and in numerous cases they have 
aI)andoned their nomadic mode of existence 
and have taken kindly to agriculture, while 
at tlie same time they have begun to 
a(lo])t many Russian customs as regards 
food, furniture, and dress. Similarly the 
Yakuts, under Russian influence, have de- 
velo])ed very considerable agricultural in- 
terests ; they are the owners of big herds 
of cattle and engage in hay making. They 
favor Russian dress and frequently con- 
struct their dwellings in the Russian style. 
Both the A'akuts and the Buriats are quick 
to learn, and in the Yakutsk province 
A'akut scholars often constitute half of the 
total in the schools, while some of them 
cpialify for higher education. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Sea Safety Bill Is Urged. 

In a leading editorial on the Seamen's bill, 
now pending in the Senate, the Washington 
Post says : 

"Will it require another great sea dis- 
aster, like that of the 'Titanic' or the 
'Volturno,' to bring about the enactment 
of legislation designed to provide greater 
safety at sea? 

"It is now more than two years since 
the sinking of the 'Titanic,' with 1,600 per- 
sons on board, aroused the people of the 
L'nited States to the need of a law which 
would compel shipowners to provide 
enough lifeboats to take care of all on 
board and for the adequate manning of 
these boats. 

"The desire of the Senate for remedial 
legislation was so great at the time of the 
disaster that a special committee was sent 
to board the 'Carpathia,' which was return- 
ing with the survivors. A lengtiiy investi- 
gation was made and a remedial measure 
was introduced. 

"Now, after two years of discussion, the 
Senate committee refers the so-called Sea- 
men's bill to a subcommittee 'for further 
consideration.' 

"Hasn't there been sufficient considera- 
tion of the subject in the two years that 
have elapsed since tlie sinking of the 'Ti- 
tanic'? Since it was possible to rush tlie 
complicated tarifif and currency bills to a 
ct)nc]usion in one session, why should it 
take more than two years to enact a law 
which involves all Americans who travel 
l^y water? 

"If an anti-trust I>ill, affecting the pros- 
perity of thousands of business men and 
tens of thousands of employes, can be 
rushed into conference after a superficial 
debate, after many members have admit- 
ted their confusion as to its meaning, why 
should the Seamen's bill, involving prob- 
lems that are almost elemental, be referred 
to a subcommittee for another delay? 

"The Seamen's bill can be thrashed out 
in conference, as well as in a subcom- 
mittee. The thing to do now is to get 
action on a measure that involves not fiscal 
matters, but the lives of thousands of per- 
sons." 



Aiding Georgia Strikers 

At a meeting of the emergency com- 
mittee of the United Textile workers at 
Fall River, Mass., President Golden made 
a report of his investigation of the strike 
at Atlanta against the Fulton Bag and Cot- 
ton Company. The report in part, follows: 

"Nearly 1,200 people are involved in the 
strike, which resulted through the discharge 
of a number of old employes who had given 
years of faithful service, because they had 
dared to form a union. Hired thugs pa- 
rade the streets around the mill, supposedly 
for the purpose of protecting the mill prop- 
erty, when, as a matter of fact, no vio- 
lence whatever either against the mill prop- 
erty or against the imported help has ever 
been attempted. The principal work these 
hired thugs are engaged in is to try and 
goad the strikers to some lawless act. 

"On my arrival in Atlanta I found our 
people were being evicted from the com- 



pany's shacks by negroes engaged by the 
company, white men in and around Atlanta 
refusing to engage in such work. I im- 
mediately purchased a number of army 
tents and secured the grounds at White 
City close to the mill property. These 
grounds are owned by an old union printer, 
and were turned over to me free of cost as 
long as the strike lasted. In about one 
more week we will have all the strikers 
under canvas, a healthful change from a 
filthy, unsanitary company shack to a clean, 
sanitary army tent, out in God's sunshine 
and fresh air, which tlie Fulton Bag and 
Cotton Company with all its millions can- 
not take from them. 

"L'nless the right to organize is granted 
to these people we are prepared to fight 
for this right until it is granted, if it 
takes all this year and the next. We are 
going to feed these people better than their 
scanty wages allowed them to feed them- 
selves. We plan to secure donations of 
clothes and shoes to fortify them against 
the cold blasts of winter from those gener- 
ous jjeople who are always read> to help 
in such a worthy cause. We plan further 
to thoroughly expose the terrible conditions 
existing in .Vtlanta and other parts of the 
South, which, to say the least, are a dis- 
grace to twentieth century civilization as 
they apply to the textile industry." 



Sudden War Is Impossible. 

America has made it impossible to be 
suddenly drawn into the present European 
war by the acceptance of peace pacts which 
were negotiated before general continental 
hostilities were begun. Great Britain, 
France, Spain, and China have signed these 
])eace commissions, while Germany, Russia 
and japan have signified their acceptance 
of the principles contained therein, though 
negotiations have not reached the point of 
drafting the formal papers. • 

With the signing of the treaties agreed 
to by Great Britain, France, Spain, and 
China, the number of agreements of this 
kind entered into by the United States will 
number twenty-six. Nineteen have been 
ratified by the Senate, and include the more 
prominent countries of South America, 
Denmark, Norway, Switzerland, Portugal, 
Italy, and the Netherlands. The treaties 
with the first four named nations provide 
"that all disputes, of every nature whatso- 
ever, to the settlement of which previous 
arbitration treaties or agreements do not 
ai)ply in their terms, or are not applied in 
fact, shall, when diplomatic methods of ad- 
justment have failed, be referred for inves- 
tigation and re])ort to a permanent inter- 
national commission and they agree not to 
declare war or begin hostilities during such 
investigation and before the report is sub- 
mitted." 

This means that after diplomatic nego- 
tiations fail to settle a disputed point, the 
matter shall be referred to a commission 
which shall report within a year, during 
which time no declaration of war shall be 
made. 

While none of the contracting parties 
surrender their right to go to war after 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transpo "t, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Socicdad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle ingia- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros c Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Bencdictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South .Mrican Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The numl)cr of foreign workers in 
Germany last year was estimated to 
be 767,000. 

All males in New Zealand from 
fourteen to eighteen years of age 
must serve in the senior cadets, from 
eighteen to twenty-five years in the 
territorial force, and from twenty-five 
to thirty years in the reserve. 

With reference to Miss Pank- 
hurst's statement that there are 
women in England receivin:^ only 2d. 
an hour for their work, Miss Bold- 
ing, an inspector under the New 
South Wales Government I.ahor De- 
partment, says: "I know of cases in 
Sydney where they receive less." 

A South American Trade Union 
Congress will take place this year, 
and the unions in the Argentine, Bra- 
zil, Chile, Paraguay, and Peru have 
expressed their intention of taking 
part. Several labor journals have 
been recently issued in hot tempered 
Brazil, and Chile, too, has its labor 
papers. 

A Royal Commission appointed by 
the British Government to inquire 
into the late strike on the Rand and 
the deportation of the nine South 
African union leaders justifies up to 
the hilt the Labor unrest and the 
strike which was so violently sup- 
pressed. The blame for the unrest 
is placed upon "the present system 
of management, remuneration, and 
discharge of white labor," and the 
predominance of ulterior aims such 
as "market manipulation," and "po- 
litical, racial, and minor electoral ad- 
vantages." 

Exclusive of seamen, the number 
of workpeople reported to the British 
Board of Trade as killed in the 
course of their employment during 
June, 1914, was 245, a decrease of 
50 on a month ago, but an increase 
of 10 on a year ago. The mean 
number for June during the five years 
(1909-1913) was 221, the maximum 
being 244 and the minimum 187. 
Fatal accidents in the railway service 
during June, 1914, numbered 45. an 
increase of 18 on a month ago, and 
of 9 on a year ago. The total num- 
ber of fatal accidents at mines was 
98, a decrease of 31 on May, 1914, 
and of 11 on June, 1913. There were 
7 fatal accidents at quarries in June, 
1914, compared with 10 a month ago, 
and 8 a year ago. The total number 
of fatal acidents reported under tin- 
Factory and Workshop Act in June. 
1914. was 93, a decrease of 33 on a 
month ago, but an increase of 12 on 
a year ago. 

The total number of claims to un- 
employment benefit made at British 
labor exchanges and other local of- 
fices of the unemployment fund dur- 
ing the four weeks ended 26th of 
June, 1914, was 73,743, as compared 
with 83,884 during the five weeks 
ended 29th May, and with 68,058 
during the four weeks ended 27tli 
June, 1913. Of the total of 73,743 
claims, 48,192 (or 65 per cent.) were 
claims for the direct payment of 
benefit, and 25,551 (or 35 per cent.) 
were claims for payment of benefit 
through associations of workpeople 
on the insured trades having arrange- 
ments with the Board of Trade under 
section 105 of the National Insurance 
Act. The number of claims during 
each of the four weeks was 16,304, 
20,285, 18,195, and 18,959 respectively, 
the average being 18,436, as com- 
pared with 16,777 in the five pre- 
ceding weeks and with 17,014 in June, 
1913. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



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CLOTHES SATISFACTION 



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For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postoffice 

Established 1904 at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Kupfer, born February 9, 
1890, at Coburg, Germany, is in- 
quired for by the German Consulate, 
201 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johannes Puun, born in Oesel, 
Arensburg, Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 84 Embarcadero, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

$10.00 reward will be paid by 
Johnson & Higgins, 244 California 
street, for information locating John 
Anderson and George T. Nelson, 
who were members of the crew of 
the steamship "Asuncion" in Octo- 
ber, 1908. 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, 108 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
.Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Anybody knowing the where- 
abouts of Arne Johnsen please 
notify O. M. Johnsen, Mosby, 
Christiand S., Norway. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship "Candida" at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

Fritjof Ellingsen, age 32, a native 
of Drammen, Norway, he was short, 
heavy set, dark hair, parted in the 
center, and good looking. Anybody 
knowing his whereabouts please noti- 
fy Ed Knach, 171 Clipper street, city. 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



A SAILOR'S BANK 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-FARING MEN 

— in the — 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and Cdiirteous treatment to all its 

custoiner.s. Four per cent, per annum i.s paid on Savini^s 

l)e])osits, computed semi-annually. 

In \')\0 it purchased and took over the business of tlie 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
SwcdisJi, Nnr\vcic;ian and I^anisli .^Kr. and lOKr. hnnk notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



San Pedro Letter List. 

-Xiiilcr.sen, A. -1645 Kremer, SigurU 

.'Viidersen, K.Tsnius Kalnamm, Andvoy 

Anilcrsen, Martin Kolodzie. George 

.\nileison. Axel Kristiansen, Nils 
.\nckr.s.son, E. -1762 Karstin. Hugo 

.ViuIor.son, H. -1883 Leideker, K. 

.\.. Mr. -1504 Lang, Chas. 

Andersen, Kdward Lindner, J. -1750 

Anderson, Gust Lundberg. T. 

Alin, Emil Lyngard. Jorgen 
Anderson. David C. Mesak, E. 

Rensen, Severin Mikalsen. Andreas 

Berndt, Hugo Martinelli, Walter 

Bringsrud, Marald Mennlcke. Fritz 

Rerg, S. Miller, Wm. 

Brogard, N. Mayers. P. M. 

Rergqvist, Wm. Mlchaelsen, A. -1105 

Bov, A. Morris, M. H. 

CIrul, M. Matison, J. -1320 

Christensen, A. Maklnan, K. 

-1095 Nilson, Edon. C. 

Cotter, J. Olsen, A. O. -759 

Carlson, Kalle Olsen. Hans 

Ceelan, John Olsen, Ole Wilhelm 

Clausen, J. Osterberg, S. H. 

Chilton, Harry -1284 

Caddel, Adolf Olsen, O. Marthln 

Carlson, Carl Paader, Hugo 

Dreger, Jack Paulson. Gustaf 

Kssen. Carl Perez, Antonio 

Klllngson, Ivar Plant, Billle 

Fasholz, Dan Peterson. C. E. -903 

Folvlk. Lewis Rutel. Ernest 

Grigoleit, E. Robblns, Jack 

Gunther. Dick Sandstrom, Ivar 

Gustafson. Alf Svensen, Nick 

Gii.sek, B. Svendsen, S. -1717 

Oronlund. Oskar Steen, J. C. 

llolinborg, Frank Sandy, Oskar 

Tlansf-n. Marius Samuelsen. Victor 

Ilolm. Arthur Schultz, Albert 
Hansen, H. T. -14-16Schultz. Axel 

Hansen, Johannes Sanseter, Paul 

Hakonsen. P. O. Schmidt, George 

Haro, Aarp Schager, E. 

Harrold, Henry Svenningsen. S. N. 

Horinanson. Fritz Schultz, Robert 
.Tohansen, Ed. -2240 Tell, Olaf 

Jnhanson, Emil Tvedt, Olaf 

Johansson, N. A. Thomas, Joseph W. 

-280 Vohs, Heinrich 

Jensen, Osoar M. Wagner, Billy 

Johnson. John A. Zimmer, Walter 

Jorgensen. H. P. Packages. 

Johnsen, George Johansen, Nils A. 
Karlson. Richard 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, Anton 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Edvard 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Gusz, Henry 
Hansen, Eugen 
Hansen, Jens 
Jorgensen, C. M. 



Johanson. John -880 
Koskinen, Suttro 
More, Walter 
Silver, Satin E. 
Ivertsen, SIgvald B. 
Speckman, Mae 
Tomkin, Frank 



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BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 



CIGARS, TOBACCO, SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Bellenot, who last sailed on 
the S. S. "Mariposa" out of Seattle, 
Wash., about November, 1912, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Mrs. Bel- 
lenot, 1406 Second street, West 
Berkeley, Cal. .Anyone knowing of 
him kindly write at the above ad- 
dress. — 6-24-14. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. .Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the 
mother, Fru Thorin, Hegagata 7, 
Goteborg, Sweden. 9-23-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The general opinion among shipping men is 
that the practice of carrying lieavy deckloads is 
responsible for the loss of the steam-schooner 
"Francis H. Leggett." 

It has been suggested in shipping circles that 
before the beginning of the Salvador coffee sea- 
son, about the end of October, a line could be 
established between New York or New Orleans 
and San Francisco through the Panama Canal. 

The keel of the new ferryboat "Ramon" 
which is being btiilt for the Oakland, Antioch 
and Eastern Railway at Pittsburg, Cal., was laid 
on Sept. 23. The boat will be used in place of 
the steamer "Bridgeit" to ferry the Sacramento 
electric trains across Suisun Bay. The "Ramon" 
will be 235 feet long, will be of steel construc- 
tion, and will handle an electric locomotive 
and eleven cars. 

William J. McGee, assistant treasurer of the 
United States at San Francisco, has been of- 
ficially authorized to receive payment of Panama 
Canal tolls. Under the instruction issued, a ves- 
sel may enter Gatun Lake from either end of 
the Canal and may, without passing through 
the locks at the other end, return to the original 
point of entry of the Canal without payment of 
additional tolls. 

It is reported that instructions have been sent 
to all British Consuls that the Government has 
no objections to the transfer of ships from 
British to American registry in cases where 
they have been continuously American-owned. 
The instructions are said to have reached Rio 
de Janeiro just after the steamer "Robert Dol- 
lar," which had been held up pending a trans- 
fer of registry, had cleared. 

The steamer "Admiral Sampson," which went 
down as the result of her collision with the 
"Princess Victoria," was the fifth vessel that the 
Pacific-Alaska Navigation Company has lost 
during its history. The others were the steam- 
ers "Portland," "Jcannie" and "Yukon," 
wrecked on the .\laska coast, and the "Ken- 
tucky," lost in the Atlantic just after leaving 
New York on her way out here to join the fleet. 

The contract for repairs to the Canadian Pa- 
cific steamship "Princess Victoria," which was 
in collision with the steamer "Admiral Samp- 
son" of? tiie Point-no-Point, has been awarded 
to Yarrows, Ltd., of Esquimalt, B. C. The 
amount covering the repair contract has not 
been disclosed. It is understood that about 
sixteen bow plates will have to be renewed and 
a section of the stem will have to be replaced. 

Work is to commence, in the near future, on 
fourteen small lighthouses for the Panama Gov- 
ernment. These will be situated on the Pacific 
coast, and will aflford a distinct aid to naviga- 
tion there. They will be located: One each 
at the entrance to the Panama Bay, Mellon 
Island, San Carlos, Port Obaldia, Port Posada, 
Santa Lucia River and Chitre; and at Aqtia- 
dulce, Mensabe and on the Linartes rock, two 
each. 

For the first time in six years, Humboldt Bay 
(Cal.) is said to have been absolutely bare of 
coasters on September 30. With the departure 
of the passenger steamers "F. A. Kilburn" and 
"George W. Elder" and the freighter "North- 
fork." there were left in the bay nothing hut 
local bay vessels, and of these only three were 
steamers, the ferryboat "Antelooe" and (he 
two Association tugs "Ranger" and "Relief," the 
latter tied up. 

A report received by the marine depart- 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce states that the German ship "Eliza Lihn," 
which sailed from Port Townsend before the 
beginning of the European conflict, arrived at 
Sydney, her destination, on September 7, sail- 
ing directly into the hands of the enemy, 
her skipper being unaware of hostilities. The 
"Lihn" carried a lumber cargo from the north- 
ern port. 

With a capitalization of $.S. 000,000, the Great 
Northern Pacific Steamship Company has filed 
articles of incorporation with the Corporation 
Commission at Salem, Ore. The company, which 
is a subsidiary of the Hill railroad lines, will en- 
gage in operating steamships and water craft 
on the Columbia River and Pacific Ocean, ac- 
cording to its articles. Two big passenger 
vessels, which will ply between Astoria and San 
Francisco, are now nearing completion. 

Commander Bertholf of the revenue-cutter 
service has received word from Unalaska that 
all the officers, members of the crew and other 
persons aboard the revenue-cutter "Tahoma" at 
the time she was wrecked on an Alaska reef, 
.September 21. have been found and are safe. 
There were eierhty-thrce persons aboard the "Ta- 
homa" when she struck. The steamer "Cordova" 
picked up sixty and the remaining twenty-three 
were supposed to have made a landing on one 
of the numerous islands. 

The rate established for shipping passing 
through the Panama Canal, $1.20 per ton, is 
regarded by shipping companies on the North 
Pacific Coast as sufficiently low to result in 
.great benefit to British Columbia in the trans- 
portation of products of the Province to the 
Eastern markets. This is especiall)' true of cop- 



per and other minerals. The toll assessment 
is made on the basis of the register ton, the 
standard measure of which is 100 cu. ft. of 
space, and not on the ton weight of 2,240 
pounds. 

The old gunboat "Vicksburg," according to 
the Bremerton News, which has been in the 
Mare Island Navy Yard a number of times 
for repairs, has been turned over to the Wash- 
ington State Militia. The "Vicksburg" last 
year was stationed at Tacoma and during the 
time that trouble was expected in Mexico was 
turned over by the State for duty in the south. 
She was one of the last boats to leave for Mexico 
and one of the first to return to the North. 
The "Vicksburg" is said to be in first-class 
condition for a training ship for the militia and 
can go on short runs at any time. 

Tenders are now being called by the Canadian 
Government for the construction of the new 
first-order lighthouse to be erected at Bonila 
Point, Hecate Strait. Construction of the 
Bonila lighthouse will be started next summer. 
The site of the proposed light is on Banks 
Island, off the Mainland, about midway through 
the Hecate Strait, on the ocean route to Prince 
Rupert. The Bonila lighthouse will be of a 
similar type to the one now in operation at 
Langara Island, the most northerly point of the 
Queen Charlotte Islands, and will be of rein- 
forced concrete construction and surmounted by 
a powerful light capable of flashing its rays for 
many miles. 

Charterers dispatching British and French 
craft from Pacific Coast ports are well insured, 
and they also think it is a pretty good sporting 
chance that the German cruisers "Leipzig" and 
"Nurnberg" will not fall in with the merchant- 
men. It is considered doubtful even if the Ger- 
mans would molest the merchantmen, as they 
have no place to take them. They might, how- 
ever, not be averse to borrowing n little bunker 
coal if they happened across a British steamer. 
German shipping is at a complete standstill. 

Thirteen dollars per 1000 for rough thirty- 
foot lengths or less, with weight based on board 
measurements in the rough, is the basis of the 
first lumber rate established for the Panama 
Canal route between the Pacific and the Atlantic 
coasts. This was the announcement made re- 
cently by W. R. Grace & Company, operating 
the Atlantic and Pacific Steamship Line. The 
formal announcement ends the long period of 
suspense under which the lumber interests have 
been laboring. For lengths from thirty to forty 
feet, $1 additional will be charged, and for 
lengths exceeding forty and up to fifty feet, the 
rate has been established at $17. The thirteen- 
dollar rate on lengths of thirty feet or less rep- 
resents a cut of $4 per 1000 feet as compared 
with the rate whicli has maintained via the 
Strait of Magellan. 

Formal announcement of the customs regu- 
lations for the Panama Canal has been made by 
Governor George W. Goethals and embodied in 
a printed form for distribution throughout the 
shipping world. The regulations, as far as 
possible, conform to the general customs regula- 
tion of the United States and take into account 
the entry and clearance of vessels, the custody 
of goods or merchandfse introduced into the 
Canal Zone, the enforcement of the immigration 
laws and regulations, the certifications of in- 
voices covering shipments of goods from the 
Canal Zone to the United States and the services 
to seamen commonly rendered by shipping com- 
missioners in American ports. In the regulations 
it is provided that the executive secretary of the 
canal shall supervise the customs service, and 
that under him will be the captains of the ports 
of the Canal Zone, who will act as ex-officio 
officers of the service and various other canal 
employes, who on special occasions will be ap- 
pointed as temporary customs officers without 
extra compensation. Vessels may enter and 
clear at either the port of Balboa or that of 
Cristobal, and if their desire is to pass through 
the canal without slopping at the opposite 
terminal they may clear at the port of entry. 
Masters of vessels entering the canal are re- 
quired to furnish the boarding officer with a 
report of arrival, including statistical data with 
reference to the vessel, its cargo and passengers. 
A manifest of cargo is required, and additional 
manifests must be furnished at each point with- 
in the Canal Zone at which the vessel dis- 
charges. Clearance papers from the last port of 
call are another requirement, as well as com- 
plete passenger lists distinguishing through 
passengers from those to be landed within the 
borders of the Canal Zone. A complete crew 
roster, list of sea stores, purser's statement, cer- 
tificate of discharge from quarantine, and, in 
cases of vessels under United .States registry, the 
register and articles specified in the regulations. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass.. 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 

Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La.. 117 Decatur St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 10 1 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.. 227 Sansom St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass., IVaA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE. Md., 802-804 S. Broadway 
NORFOLK. Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 

HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 214 West St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St 
CLEVELAND, • O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day SL 
ERIE, Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1185 W. Eleventh St 
CHICAGO. HI.. 445 La Salle Ave 
DETROIT. Mich.. 27 Jeffer.son Ave. 
MTLWATTKEE. Wi.s., 151 Reed St 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 I.<!abella St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1401 West Ninth SL 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. HI., 40G N. Clark St 
ASHTABUI/A, O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO. O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 East Woodbridge St. 
PT. TTTTRON, Mich., 517 W.nter St 
CONNEAUT. O., 922 Day St 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C, 518 Yates St. 

VANCOUVER, B C. 213 Iln.stIng St., E. corner of 
TInstIng and Main, P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTI-E. Wash.. 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 14 Union Ave., Box 2100 

I'UREKA, Cal., 227 First St.. P, O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

TIONOLITLU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
r. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSH£D WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Eitablished in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montiis - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of eacli weelc. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents siiould ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to tlie 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1914. 



VICTOR HUGO'S PROPHECY. 



A day will come when the only battlefield 
will be the market open to commerce and the 
mind opening to new ideas. A day will come 
when bullets and bombshells will be replaced 
by votes, by the universal suffrage of nations, 
by the venerable arbitration of a great sovereign 
senate, which will be to Europe what the Parlia- 
ment is to England, what the Diet is to Ger- 
many, what the Legislative Assembly is to 
France. A day will come when a cannon will 
be exhibited in public museums, just as an in- 
strument of torture is now, and people will be 
astonished how such a thing could have been. 
A day will come when these two immense groups, 
the United States of America and the United 
States of Europe, shall be seen placed in pres- 
ence of each other, extending the hand of fel- 
lowship across the ocean. 



THE "ABSENT \'OTERS" BILL. 



A measure of particular interest to seamen 
and other classes of workers who are com- 
])elled to be absent from their homes on elec- 
tion days is the so-called ".Absent Voters" 
bill which is now pending before the citizens 
of California. The Commonwealth of Aus- 
tralia has for years had a similar "Absent 
Voters" law, and it seems to have worked 
out to the entire satisfaction of the workers 
over there. 

The California measure has been placed 
before the people through the Initiative and 
will appear upon the ballot at the general 
election in November. It will be known as 
No. 14, "Voting by Absent Electors." 

The following brief description of the bill 
shows that the measure is surrounded witii 
ample safeguards to i^revcnt fraud and yet 
enable many a citizen to register bis vote 
who has heretofore been denied that privi- 
lege because the nature of calling required 
his absence from his home precinct. 

.\ny registered voter of California desiring 
to lake advantage of the new law may apply 
to the Countv Clerk or Registrar, where such 



oftice is created, for an identification certifi- 
cate and an official ballot for the ensuing 
election. -Application for the necessary pa- 
l)ers must be made in person not earlier than 
twenty days and not later than ten days be- 
fore a general or primary State election. 
'I"he certificate has attached to it a stub which 
i^ detachable b)' a perforated line. Such 
certificates and corresponding stul)s are num- 
bered consecutively, and contain directions for 
entries to be made thereon, as follows: Date 
of issue, name of applicant, color of eyes, 
height, age, color of hair, visible scars or 
marks, signature of api)licant. and number of 
ballot issued. 

There is also provided blank si)ace for the 
official's signature showing that the person 
therein described is a cjualificd voter, and 
giving the date when tiie identification certifi- 
cate becomes void. 

On the back of the certificate is i)rinted a 
blank form of an affidavit to be filled out 
only when the a]5plicant desires to vote in 
another precinct, which affidavit recites that 
the person described in the certificate is a 
c|iialified voter who is required to he absent 
from iiis voting precinct on election day, and 
Avill have no opportunity to vote there. 

Before issuing the certificate and liallot the 
official enters upon the stub the data con- 
tained in the certificate, signs the .same, and 
t)cfore separating the certificate from the stub 
affixes his .seal in such a manner that a por- 
tion of the impression will appear on each 
side of the perforated line separating the cer- 
tificate and the stub. The certificate is tlien 
torn ofif and ])laccd in a sealed envelope to- 
gether with the ballot to be used in the en- 
suing election. There is also enclosed an 
unsealed envelope with the printed name and 
address of the i)roper official, and bearing 
the words, "Identification certificate and bal- 
lot of absent voter." The envelope contain- 
ing the enclosures is to be sealed with seal- 
ing wax, and bears printed upon it the fol- 
lowing record : 

Identification certificate and ballot issued to 

, a voter of 

precinct on , 19. . . 

.Also a blank s]xice for the signature of 
clerk or deputy, which must be affixed. 

The name of the applicant, the number of 
the certificate and the ballot is then entered 
upon his home precinct register, and it is 
provided that a se])arate register shall be kept 
for each precinct giving only the names of the 
absent voters and the numbers of certificates 
and ballots issued. 

The ])erson holding the certificate and bal- 
lot may on election date vote in any ])rccinct 
within the State more than ten miles distant 
from his home precinct. The method of 
voting is very simple. The voter hands his 
envelope to the judge of the election in the 
precinct where he wishes to vote. After 
breaking the seal the election officer removes 
the certificate and ballot and the applicant 
is then required to sign the affidavit on the 
back of the certificate. If the election board 
is satisfied that the applicant is the person 
described in the certificate and if the number 
of the ballot corresponds to that stated in the 
certificate, the election officer hands the bal- 
lot to the applicant, who then retires in the 
voting booth, where he marks and folds his 
ballot. The voter then hands his ballot to 
the election officer, who again compares the 
ballot number with the number in the certifi- 
cate, and if correct, enclo.ses the identification 
certificate and the ballot in the addressed en- 
velojie and seals the same. When the polls 



are closed, the election officers must immedi- 
ately mail, postage prepaid, all envelopes con- 
taining the ballots of absent voters. 

At ten o'clock a. m. after the first Monda)' 
following the election, a number of .specified 
county officers meet to canvass all such bal- 
lots. The envelopes are opened, one at a 
lime, the certificates and ballots removed 
therefrom. The certificates and stubs are 
compared to ascertain if they correspond as 
originally is.sued. If everything ajipears cor- 
rect, the stub and certificates are sealed in a 
blank envelope, and the number torn from 
the ballot which must remain unfolded, and 
is thereupon deposited in a ballot box. All 
blank envelopes containing stubs and certifi- 
cates are then enclosed in a sealed package 
to be kept unopened as long as ballots are to 
i)e preserved. The ballots in the box arc 
then canvassed and counted by the proper 
officials of the county in open session. Any 
certificates and accompanying ballots that do 
not seem correct as originally issued must 
be turned over to the district attorney, who 
.shall preserve the .same and institute proper 
proceedings to find and ])unish parties .guilty 
of fraudulent voting. 

I f a voter .should return to his home ])re- 
cinct on election day, provision is made that 
he may vote there by simply giving u]) his 
voting envelope and after proper records of 
such fact have been made, the voter is given 
anotJier ballot and his voting envelope is foi-- 
warded to the county clerk to be destroyed. 

The iirincipal object of the absent voters 
law is 1(3 enable all persons whose occupa- 
tion demands their temporary or habitual ab- 
sence from home an opportunity to record 
their votes. Railroad men and others who 
are constantly ashore will all be able to cast 
their votes as long as they come to their 
homes at any time during the ten days when 
ballots are issued. The same applies to sea- 
men, but the latter must be in one of the 
l)orts of the State on election day in order 
to be able to exercise their franchise as 
citizens. 

It is to be ho])e(l that notwithstanding the 
limitations of this measure, the seafaring 
people of California will bestir themselves to 
place this meritorious proposition upon the 
statute book. This will stimulate and en- 
courage the lawmaking bodies in other States 
to enact similar measures until ultimately a 
seaman will be able to cast his vote in any 
jiort of any State. 



The [oi'KX.M. has on many occasions 
taken i.ssuc with Colle.ge Professors who 
espoused theoretical doctrines and plausible 
half-truths with a view of reforming the 
()rganizations of labor. It is a genuine 
pleasure, therefore, to present in this issue 
the three contributions from noted Pro- 
fessors in the Labor Day issue of the 
"American Federationist." All three are 
worth reading. They render eloquent testi- 
mony that trade-unionism is beginning to 
be thoroughly understood. 



.According to the .^an Pedro Daily Pilot, 
the late Charles Maro, master of the ill- 
fated steam-schooner "Francis H. Leggett," 
just prior to his last trip confided to a 
friend "that it would only be a question of 
time until a heavy deckload would be the 
cause of his vessel turning turtle and re- 
cording another marine disaster." Still 
there are shipowners who would have us 
believe that not a "single life was ever lost 
on account of a deckload " 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MILITARISM AT HOME. 



While we read and think about the evils 
of militarism abroad we ought not to for- 
get that we have some awful examples of 
that blighting curse right at home. 

The militia of the State of Colorado has 
just tried by court-martial twenty-two of- 
ficers and men for setting on fire the tents 
of the striking coal miners at Ludlow on 
April 20, 1914, which resulted in the kill- 
ing of women and children. All the mem- 
bers of that notorious band of assassins 
were acquitted of murder, manslaughter 
and larceny, and the verdicts have been 
approved by Adjutant-General Chase and 
Governor Amnions. 

It seems difftcult to believe, but what 
else could be expected? Militarism is not 
only among us but is growing. Even our 
public schools have caught the military 
spirit and the children are taught to drill 
and march and even shoot at targets. 

There were 13,000 boys in military train- 
ing in New York schools while Roosevelt 
was the Chief Executive of this Nation, 
and so much interest did this ex-President 
take in fostering militarism in school that 
he wrote a personal letter to the boy who 
made the best score in shooting. 

The California Legislature of 1911 appro- 
priated $5,000 for military drill in public 
schools; in 1913 the amount was raised to 
$10,000. There was little or nothing said 
about it in the newspapers or elsewhere, for 
the ad\()cates of militarism prefer to work 
(|uietly but effectively. 

So it would seem that the projier place 
to begin fighting militarism is the public 
school, for it is only too true, as has been 
so eloquently said by B. O. Flower, "that 
the ideals and thoughts which fill the 
horizon of childhood color all after life." 

We quote further from Mr. Flower: 

If, during the formative period the ideals 
which fill the child's mind be essentially noble 
and humane, if he be taught that his mission 
is to help subdue the savage in man, to trans- 
form swords into ploughshares and spears into 
pruning-hooks, or in other words, to become a 
savior of life and a dispenser of happiness in- 
stead of a slayer of his brother and an angel 
of darkness, he will grow to manhood brave 
but gentle, manly but loving. 

On the other hand the child who is drilled 
in the manual of arms has constantly before 
him the hour when he may draw the trigger 
which means death to a fellow-man; he comes 
to love the sound of the drum beat, and learns 
to long for a chance to shoulder the murder- 
ous gun. He turns to the lives of Alexander, 
Caesar and Napoleon; dreams of fame through 
slaughter, of power through devastation and de- 
struction, fill his mind, and by coming to be- 
lieve it is legitimate to kill his fellow-men 
when ordered to by a superior officer, the 
highest and finest elements in his mind are be- 
numbed. And I may say here, what I most 
profoundly believe, that there can never be an 
approach to civilization so long as the child 
mind receives military drill, for the associa- 
tions, ideals and dreams which necessarily fol- 
low in the wake of warlike instruction are so 
at variance with the ideals which alone can re- 
deem the world from hate, greed and injustice, 
that until children are taught to entertain a pro- 
found reverence for human life, human rights 
and for justice in its broadest sense, humanity 
will not know what true civilization is. 

Surely these sentiments are worthy of 

note. Is it not high time to begin war 

upon militarism by demanding the repeal 

of all laws which promote military drill and 

the war spirit in our public schools? 



THE YELLOW PERIL. 



The objection to compulsory arbitration 
lies not so much in the fear of injustice 
as in the dislike of being forced to accept 
even justice at the hands of the Govern- 
ment. We prefer the injustice of our own 
making to the justice of an assumed 
master. 



The war of natiotis has brought home to 
the wcjrkers many a bitter lesson. And 
the seamen have not been neglected — far 
from it — their pill has perhaps been the 
most bitter and unpalatable. 

Take the case of Great Britain. A\diile 
the country summons the native white sea- 
men of her merchant marine to man the 
fleet — the Chinese and the Lascars cheer- 
fully fill the \acancies thus created at great- 
ly reduced rates of pay. 

We quote of our British contemporary. 
The Seaman, of London : 

"It is with deep regret we find ourselves 
compelled to draw attention to the fact that 
certain British 'patriotic' shipowners are 
still employing cheap Chinese labor for the 
manning of liritish ships. Almost every 
day intimation is being conveyed to us of 
ignoble efforts in this direction. Only last 
week we had an urgent telegram from 
^Manchester stating that the steamshi]) 
'St. Helena," belonging to the St. Enoch 
Shipping Company, of Glasgow, and the 
steamship 'Mirimachi,' owned by the Bank 
Line C«jmpany, also of Glasgow, were en- 
deavoring to secure Chinese crews to man 
their ships at Manchester where a large 
number of British seamen and firemen are 
at present out of employment. At any rate 
we understand the arrangements were 
made whereby the Chinese were brought to 
sign on for the 'St. Helena' at Manchester 
but owing to the feared hostility of unem- 
ployed British seamen in the port, a new- 
order was made under which the signing 
on process was transferred to Partington, 
about seven or eight miles outside the 
Manchester Ship Canal. In regard to the 
"INIirimachi' a telegram received just be- 
fore going to press acquaints us of the re- 
grettable fact that Chinese have definitely 
been engaged to work the vessel. All we 
can hope is that if either of the companies 
referred to should apply to the Govern- 
ment for any transport work that those in 
authority will see to it that some explana- 
tion should be forthcoming as to why 
British labor should be pas.sed over in favor 
of Chinese. The British seaman is today 
offering his life for his country. Thousands 
of the best men of our mercantile marine 
who were members of the Royal Naval Re- 
serve, directly the call was made, rushed to 
the Board of Trade offices in Great Britain, 
and to the Constil Offices in foreign coun- 
tries, ready to be taken over without no- 
tice, regardless of their home ties, regard- 
less of all risk, willing and anxious to 
serve their country in time of danger. 
Others of them volunteered for the army, 
their one desire being to be of service to 
the nation in her hour of trial. In face of 
these facts is it any wonder that we feel 
indignant at Chinese being prefrered to 
Britishers? At the present moment there 
arc numbers of our own seamen and fire- 
men in all parts of Great Britain only too 
willing to find employment, but in spite of 
all their sacrifices in the past, in spite of 
their traditional bravery, we find certain 
British shipowners unpatriotic enough to 
pass over their fellow subjects in order to 
secure cheap Chinese labor. 

"We think the time has arrived when the 
British public should take this matter in 
hand. Large numbers of the wives, chil- 
dren, and other dependents of our British 
(Continued on Page 9.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 5, 1914. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., C. y\. Albrecht presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull. Quarterly Finance Com- 
mittee reported having examined the Union's 
accounts for the third quarter and found same 
correct. The next meeting of the Sailors' Union 
will be held Tuesday, October 13, 1914, Monday 
being Columbus Day, a legal holiday. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 28, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
518 Yates St. Phone 1325. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 28, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastmgs St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

Tacoma Agency, Sept. 28, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 28, 1914, 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



.'\berdeen .\gency, Sept. 28. 1914. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 28, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 44 Union Ave. North. Tel. 
East 4912. 



Eureka .\gency, Sept. 28, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 
JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 28.. 1914. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN. Agent. 
128^^ Septilveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 21, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal.. Oct. 1, 1914. 

Regular meeting was called to order at 7 p. m., 
Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping improving. Nominations of officers for 
the ensuing term and delegate to the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union Convention were pro- 
ceeded with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle .Agency, Sept. 24, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. Box No. 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 24, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping very poor; plenty of 
men ashore. HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 

P. O. Box 54. 

DIED. 

Olaf Olsen, No. 719, a native of Norway, age 
47, died at Portland, Ore., Sept. 30, 1914. 

Olaf Marius Olsen, No. 915, a native of Nor- 
way, age 31, died in New York, N. Y., Sept. 
21, 1914. 

.Albert Waiilstedt, No. 778, a native of Fin- 
land, age 32, died at San h'rancisco, Cal., Sept. 
29, 1914. 

Louritz Bernard Johancsen. No. 1188, a native 
of Norway, age 34, died at Los Angeles, Cal., 
Oct. 2, 1914. 

Eric Erickson, No. 888, a native of I'^inland, 
age 28. died at Seattle. Wash., Oct. 4, 1914. 

The following members were drowned in the 
wreck of the S.S. '"Francis H. Leggett," Sept. 
18, 1914: 

John Johnson, No. 983, a native of Norway, 
age 34, 

Carl Henri Kramer, X'o. 902, a native of Ger- 
many, age 39. 

Carl Johan Maro, No. 708, a native of Nor- 
way, aarc 36. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DETECTIVES IN UNIONS. 



When before the Industrial Relations 
Commission in Los Angeles Frances N. 
Noel, of the Women's Trade Union League, 
said that one of the gravest dangers the 
trade unions have to meet today is the de- 
tectives. These vermin are slick talkers, 
they are picked men, selected by a dozen or 
more agencies whose special graft is the 
furnishing of assistance to the employing 
class by weakening the unions and keep- 
ing the bosses posted about what is going 
on and who the active members are. 

These spies are selected for their low 
cunning and ability to talk. They work 
themselves into the unions by being given 
employment at the dififerent trades. And 
once in the unions they begin their ne- 
farious work. 

The power of unions is implied in the 
very name itself — unity. -V union is a 
body of workmen joined together for a 
specific purpose and their strength and 
success lies in the compactness of their 
union — the oneness of thought and action 
with which they go about the work they 
have in view. 

It is plain, therefore, that the main w-ork 
of the stoolpigeon is to break down that 
unity and so far as possible get the mem- 
bers at loggerheads with each other. A 
general outline of the work is mapped out 
for the crooks by the "strategists" at the 
head of the "agencies," who have studied 
the question thoroughly. The "operative" 
— that's the official title of the skunk who 
is detailed to undermine your union — goes 
to work quietly. He gets a dollar a day 
from the "agency" in addition to the wages 
he draws where he is employed. He is 
given a number and reports every day, sign- 
ing with the number. This precaution is 
taken to protect his identity from any mis- 
hap in the mails. 

He notes everything that goes on among 
the men in the shop. The "agitators" for 
unionism are reported promptly to the 
"agency," who report back to the boss. 
For this service the boss pays the "agency" 
from three to five dollars a day. 

Rut it is in the union where the skunk 
does the most dastardly work. The union 
is the workers' only defense. Without the 
union the toiler is as helpless as a new- 
born baby. Individually he is as powerless 
to influence the order of things as the little 
stranger just arrived. 

There are two things that bring power in 
this world — money and many. The em- 
ployers have the money. They have 
through divers means got possession of the 
earth and everything thereon and, as a con- 
sequence, dictate the politics, the religion 
and the economies of the world. With 
their money they buy men in every avenue 
of life, of which the stoolpigeon and his 
"agency" of finks are not the most danger- 
ous to society as a whole, while, of course, 
they are the greatest annoyance to the 
unions because they attack them direct. 

The power of wealth lies in the organiza- 
tion of the individual dollars. A man with 
a million dollars has an organization a 
million strong, all co-operating together, al- 
ways a unit in whatever direction directed. 
Everyone knows that a man with a million 
has twice the power of a man with half a 
million. Why? Because the man with 
the million has twice as large an organ- 
ization with twice the strength. 




So the employers especially know and 
appreciate the power of organization. It is 
thus that money gets its power — organiza- 
tion and co-operation of the individual dol- 
lars. 

Now, what of that other source of jjower, 
the many? The individual man is the unit 
here. The worker is the unit in the organ- 
ization of labor. A million workers acting 
as one with a single purpose, all moving 
in one direction, that constitutes the power 
of many. 

This is the workers' only power. The 
power of union is the only power that has 
ever risen to compete with the power of 
money. Is it any wonder the money power 
uses all its efforts to stem the rising tide of 
organized labor, whose power threatens to 
equal if not surpass their own? Is it any 
wonder that they should spend wealth 
freely in an eflfort to disrupt the only power 
that was ever started to give them battle? 
It can easily be understood then why the 
employers avail themselves so freely of the 
finks and stoolpigeons that compose the 
"agencies." 

Vou can see also that their concern is not 
the individual in the shop, but the union 
that combines the power of the individuals. 
The individual can always be handled with- 
out danger to the dollar, and crushed, ruth- 
lessly, by blacklist or faked up criminal 
charges. ]'>ut llic union cannot be so 
easily handled, and its power is beyond 
measure when permitted to grow. 

To prevent that growth and to destroy 
it, where it has developed, is the main 
work assigned to the stoolpigeon. 

The first work of the spy in the union is 
to get a line on things. He finds out who 
the best union workers are and what are 
the principal and most important proposi- 
tions before the organization. When he se- 
cures this information he starts to "operate" 
on the members. 

The most eflfective way to destroy a 
union is to .spread and create suspicion and 
distrust among the members. The stool- 
pigeon is wise to all this, and after picking 
out the victims to be attacked he begins 
the button-holing act. He will pick you 
out on the sidewalk after the meeting and 
in a smooth manner inject a dose of poison 
into your mind. He will insinuate that so 
and so is crooked; the victim always being 
an officer of ability and honesty, whose en- 
deavors are bringing results for the union. 
He will attempt to get one member pulling 
against another. 

He will attack the payment of high dues 
and assessments, insinuating- and charging 
that the only object of such is to create a 
pork barrel for the use of the officers, 
whose only purpose, he will assert, is to 
live in ease and luxury at the expense of 
the rank and file. 

He will be especially strong on this mat- 
ter of union funds, for he has been in- 
structed that the most eflfective way to 
weaken a union is to keep its treasury 
empty, so it can't pay strike benefits nor 
put organizers in the field to agitate for 
new members. 

His attack on the officers has a two-fold 
purpose : First, to destroy the confidence 
of the men and weaken the unity of action : 
second, to improve his own chances of 
getting elected to office. 

The goal of the stoolpigeon is to get into 
office in the union ; there he can do the 
most good for his union-wrecking em- 



ployers and increase his pay from them. 
.\nd he not infrequently gains his object 
in this respect, for his oily tongue and 
willingness to do things for the union, com- 
bined with his systematic knocking, soon 
gets him a standing. 

Once in an important office he has influ- 
ence and opportunity to work his master's 
will. This is the danger every union has 
to contend with to-day and it is a dififerent 
matter to guard against the intrusion of 
these snakes into the ranks of organized 
labor. 

The best way to protect ourselves is to 
look out for the fellow who pursues these 
tactics and watch him. Watch the fel- 
low who endeavors to sow the seed of 
disruption in your local. Make him pro- 
duce the goods. 

The honest member who has some im- 
provement he wishes to introduce will not 
pursue his aim in a manner that will tend 
to weaken the strength and unity of the 
organization. He will not pursue the rule 
or ruin policy. He will work for the best 
interests of the union, always careful to 
take no step that will in the slightest de- 
gree lessen the confidence of the member- 
ship in the organization. 

Watch the underhanded knocker and 
brand him with the mark of Cain when 
you get him; he is a stoolpigeon, a scoun- 
drel .sent into your ranks to destroy your 
only protection. — Jay Fox, in the Timber 
\\'orker. 



SLAVES TO MONEY. 



"There is not a man in the city of New 
York with genius enough, with brains 
enough, to own five millions of dollars. Why? 
The money owns him. He becomes a key 
to a safe. That money will get him up 
at daylight ; that money will separate him 
from ids friends ; that money will fill his 
heart with fear; that money will rob his 
days of sunshine and his nights of pleasant 
dreams. He cannot own it. He becomes 
the property of that money. And he goes 
right on making more. What for? He does 
not know. It becomes a kind of insanity. — 
Robert Ingersoll. 



The English Court of Appeals has upheld 
an award of £2.500, made by the President 
(Sir Samuel Evans) in favor of the com- 
mander, officers, and crew of H. M. S. 
"Melpomene" as remuneration for salvage 
services rendered to the steamshij) "Domira." 
It appeared that on May 6, 1912, the "Do- 
mira," a vessel of 3,113 tons, while bound 
from Philadelphia to \'era Cruz with a cargo 
of coal, stranded on the Alacran Reef and 
remained fast, sustaining severe damage tcj 
her hull. News of the mishap was con- 
veyed through the P>ritish Consul to the 
cruiser "Melpomene," which was lying at 
Puerto, Mexico, and the warship promptly 
proceeded to the assistance of the "Domira." 
After about 1,200 tons of coal had been 
jettisoned by the man-o'-war's men, the 
stranded vessel was towed oflf the reef, and, 
having been temporarily patched by the 
cruiser's divers, was able to proceed to 
Havana under her own steam. The Court of 
Appeal dismissed the appeal of the owners 
of the "Domira." 



To enable a person to make button- 
holes more neatly, a tubular metal clamp 
for holding textiles has been invented. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PEACE NOT WANTED. 



The Colorado coal operators have refused 
to accept President Wilson's proposition 
for a three-year truce and the strike which 
has resulted in seventy-five deaths may 
continue indefinitely unless the President 
takes over the mines or closes them down. 

John R. Lawson, Executive Board Mem- 
ber of the United Mine Workers, has is- 
sued the following statement regarding the 
operators' reply to President Wilson's let- 
ter outlining an adjustment of the coal 
strike : 

"Concerning the proposition submitted 
by the President of the United States to 
the miners and operators, it is unnecessary 
to say that some of the clauses, were, of 
course, objectionable to the strikers. 

"But the miners, after giving it due con- 
sideration, keeping in mind that it was 
backed by the influence of President Wil- 
son, in an effort to show the public they 
desired to be fair, accepted it. 

"The operators, who have taken the pub- 
lic into their confidence so often with 
statements which were not borne out by 
facts, continued this policy in their letter 
to the President when Mr. Welborn said 
his company was producing 70 per cent, 
of their tonnage. Records in the Colorado 
Fuel and Iron office show that that com- 
pany produced from Jan. 1 to Sept. 1, 
1914, but 57.99 per cent, of the amount of 
coal mined during the same period of 1913. 

"They tell the President that they 'con- 
scientiously did everything to prevent trou- 
ble with their employes and then to heal 
the breach.' Is it possible that they mean 
they tried to prevent the trouble by their 
importation from West Virginia of deadly 
machine guns and hundreds of vicious and 
unscrupulous Baldwin-Felts gunmen or that 
at Ludlow they were trying to heal the 
breach? 

"The operators have blundered miserably 
since the beginning. They have proven 
to the world who the real anarchists are. 
When Ethelbert Stewart, representative of 
Secretary of Labor Wilson, was in Den- 
ver they treated him with utter contempt. 
When Secretary of Labor Wilson was here 
in person his treatment was little better 
than that of his subordinate. He had hardly 
left the State before they began to malign 
him, casting reflections on his sincerity in 
trying to bring about an amicable settle- 
ment. Deliberate attempts were also made 
tf) deceive the Congressional committee by 
the introduction of irrelevant and mislead- 
ing testimony. 

"The Federal Commission of Concilia- 
tion, Fairley and Davies, was treated with 
equal discourtesy. 

"And now, to cap the climax, comes the 
monumental blunder of them all — they at- 
tempt to browbeat and bully-rag the Pres- 
ident of the United Stetcs " 



A comfort to the starving unemployed in 
war time : 

Every shot of a 4-inch gun costs. . . . £6 
" " 8-inch " .... £19 

11-inch " .... £98 

12-inch ' ....£210 

Not counting the damage every shot in- 
flicts ! If money was spent at such a rate 
for education, feeding of hungry children, 
etc., what an outcry there would be among 
the rich ! — Voix du Peuple. Genoa, Italy. 



THE YELLOW PERIL. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



seamen who are fighting the cause of right 
are unfortunately in straitened circum- 
stances just now — is it t(io much to ask 
that those of our comrades who are left 
behind (through no fault of their own) 
should be given what employment may be 
going? 

"The Yellow Peril has previously been 
referred to in these columns. Its effects 
have been proved to be detrimental to the 
interests of the nation at large. Against 
the yellow man we have nothing to say so 
long as he confines his operations to his 
own country, but that he should be mixed 
up with Western civilization seems to us 
unthinkable. Why should shipowners en- 
courage such a condition of things? Cer- 
tain firms call themselves patriotic ; they 
preach Tarift" Reform on the one hand, and 
employ Chinese labor on the other. Per- 
haps they would subscribe a few pounds 
to the Prince of Wales' Fund for the sake 
of securing a cheap advertisement, but 
where, we ask, does their patriotism come 
in if they refuse to encourage their own 
countrymen at a time such as the present? 
To such as these we would address but 
one term, 'Hypocrites.' 

"We intend in the near future to publish 
the names of all ships, together with the 
names of their owners, that have signed 
on Chinese crews since the Declaration of 
War by this country, and we shall certainly 
make a most strenuous appeal to the Brit- 
ish public in this regard. We shall want 
to know if British shipowners are to be 
allowed to man their ships with Chinese 
crews while a large number of our own 
competent countrymen are walking about 
the docks. We do not know what such 
'patriotic' shipowners will have to say for 
themselves in the event of any of their 
vessels being captured or mined on the 
high seas. Presumably they will apply for 
indemnities, but in such circumstances the 
question must undoubtedly arise as to the 
composition of the crews. When that time 
does arrive we venture to think that all 
fair-minded men will agree that cheap 
Chinese labor-seeking owners should be 
called on for explanations as to why Brit- 
ishers were barred from their ships." 



WHY? 

Why expect the Kaiser, who upheld mili- 
tary brutality at Zabern, to condemn simi- 
lar brutality at Louvain? Why ex])ect the 
Czar, who approved of Red Sunday and 
the Kishneff massacre to disapprove of 
Cossack criminality in East Prussia? When 
all the armies are through with killing 
foreigners they will doubtless be prepared, 
wdienever called upon, to deal the same 
way with their countrymen, who are now 
cheering, applauding or excusing them. 
They will deal with them even as they 
dealt at Dublin a few weeks ago, on the 
gun-running occasion, or as they dealt in 
1910 with the strikers at Berlin and suf- 
frage demonstrationists throughout Prussia. 
Why should one look for squeamishness in 
soldiers in dealing with vanquished for- 
eigners, when these same soldiers have not 
hesitated to fire on their own countrymen? 
—The Public. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street. East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, .N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS : 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 
BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 2295. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main street 

niOTROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

crncAoo, ill., Detroit, mich.. Cleveland, o. 

RELIEF STATIONS: 

A.sliland, Wis. ORdensburg, N. Y. 

A.ilitabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Rnffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich, 

Duluth, Minn. M.inltowoc, Wis, 

Rscanaba, Mich. Mnrquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. S.indusky, O. 

r.'- iington, Mich. S.nilt Ste. Marie, Mich. 

M;inisfep, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

i:iie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Monomlnee, Mich. Tnledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURXAI.. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



the time expires, it is l)elieved that "s<jbei- 
second thoui^ht." made possible by ex- 
tended conferences, will make impossible 
an outbreak like the one at present in 
Europe, and will also do much to minimize 
the danger of war at any time. 



Percentage of Workers Organized. 

It is a favorite statement of trade-union 
opponents that the unions represent but 
three per cent, of the wa.i^e earners and that 
therefore ihey are not entitled to speak for 
labor. 

The statement that but three per cent, of 
.American workmen were organized into 
trade-unions has l)een made so frequently 
and asserted with such a show of authority 
that many have cmie to believe that it 
contained' a measure of truth. President 
Gompers analyzed this statement recently 
before the sub-committee of the Commit- 
tee on the Judiciary of the Tnitcd States 
Senate. 

He showed that the twelfth census report 
on "Occupations" (page 86, table 21) stated 
that in the year 1909, the whole number 
of persons (men, women and children) 
engaged in gainful occupations was 29,073,- 
233. 

These occupations were grouped in- five 
grand divisions, namely: 

Agricultural. 10,381,765. or .V?. 7 per cent. 
of the whole. 

i'rofessionai services, l,258,.i38, or -l.j 
per cent. 

Domestic and personal services, 5,580,- 
657, or 19.2 per cent. 

Trade and transportation, 4,766,964, or 
16.4 per cent. 

Manufacturing and mechanical, 7,085,309, 
or 24.4 per cent. 

Commenting on the first two divisions, 
President Gompers said : 

"In the first division, or those engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, some 3,000,000 per- 
sons are enrolled in the Farmers' Educa- 
tional and Co-operative L'nion of .America 
and the .American Society of Equity. 

"This shows that nearly 29 per cent, of 
the persons engaged in agricultural pursuits 
are members of industrial and economic 
organizations. 

"The second division, namely, 'profes- 
sional persons,' comprises those engaged in 
law, medicine, dentistry, academies, hos- 
pitals and ministers. 

"These are not eligible to trade unions 
because they are not w-age earners in the 
accepted sense, but are either distributors 
of wealth or have supervisory i)ositions 
in the creation of wealth. 

"The trade-union movement is largely 
recruited from the fifth, or 'manufacturing 
and mechanical,' division, with its 7.085,309 
persons. 

"In this list is included, as in the fourth 
division, vast armies of solicitors, traveling 
men, secretaries, confidential clerks, and 
men in supervisory and managerial posi- 
tions. 

"When the grand total of all these ele- 
ments is subtracted from the numbers 
listed as engag'ed in 'gainful occupations,' 
it will be found that of those 30,000,000 
persons, many millions of them could not 
belong to trade-unions, and neither have 



tlicv any need for trade-unions, as far as 
direct benefit is concerned. 

"While the exact number is unknown, 
it is safe to say that the .American Federa- 
tion of Labor and the allied railroad broth- 
erhoods, appnjximating 3,000,000 members, 
exclusive of the 3,000,000 organized farm- 
ers, not t;nly truly represent the .American 
wage workers, but these organizations have 
enrolled a greater percentage of eligible 
persons than any other American institu- 
tion, save, possibly, the organizations of 
liankers, doctors, and lawyers." 



l)oth parties in the event of a dispute. The 
decision of this committee is to be retroac- 
tive, starting frc^ni the day the dispute 
arose. This will make a prolonged continu- 
ance of the discussion of no value. 

WOrk is to be equally divided during the 
dull season, and the employers pledge 
themselves to maintain sanitary conditions 
in the shops. 



Cigarmakers Enforce Law. 

'I'lie -Massachusetts State law wliich de- 
clares it unlawful to make false statements 
in advertisements was taken advantage of 
Ijy union ci.garmakers in this city to end 
the practice of a non-union cigar manufac- 
turer who was deceiving the public. 

The manufacturer purchased a well- 
kn<n\n lO-ccnt brand, discontinued its use. 
and tlien placed the name on a cheaper 
grade. 

'I'he law makes it an offense to "know- 
ingly make or disseminate or cause to be 
made or dis.seminate any statement or as- 
sertion of fact concerning the quantity, 
the quality, the method of production or 
manufacture, the cost of production, the 
cost of the advertiser, the present or 
former price . . . which statement or 
assertion has the appearance of an ofTer 
advantageous to the purchaser and is un- 
true and calculated to mislead." 

L'nder this law, which was originally in- 
tended for the use of business men, the 
unionists secured the conviction of the 
jobber handling the non-union goods, and 
who was prohil)ited from handling adver- 
tising matter. He was also compelled to 
return all cigars to the manufacturer which 
bore the name of the defunct union cigar, 
the Court holding that this name had a 
value in Massachusetts, and its present use 
was intended to deceive the public, and 
tliat such action was a violation of the law 
of tlie State. 



Avert Big Garment Strike. 

Garment workers in l'hiladeii)hia have 
won an important victory by the signing 
of a joint agreement with their employers, 
and peace has supiilanted war talk and 
strike arrangements. 

Parties to the contract are officers of the 
Cloak Manufacturers' Association and Pres- 
ident Schlesinger. of the International La- 
dies' Garment \\'orkers' Union and Presi- 
dent Max .Amdur. of the joint board of the 
Cloak and Skirt Makers' L^nion. It is 
agreed that a peace protocol similar to the 
one operating in New York shall be estab- 
lished, consisting of representatives of the 
employers and workers, to which all griev- 
ances shall be referred. .A fifty-two-hour 
week will take the place of the present 
fifty-four-hour system. 

Substantial wage increases feature the 
new contract, w^hich provides that cutters 
shall receive a minimum wage ranging 
from $17 to $26 a week, instead of the pres- 
ent scale, which runs from $12 to $17. 
Trimmers are to receive $8 per week for 
the first two years, $11 the third year, and 
$12 for the fourth year; followed by a $13 
to $19 rate, according to skill. 

Piecework prices shall be settled by a 
committee consisting of representatives of 



Can Not Abandon Property. 

In a most remarkable decision, the Pub- 
lic L'tilities Commission of Ohio has laid 
down new ideals for the management of 
1 ail way and street-car companies in that 
State, together with other public utilities, 
which will ])e governed by the same prin- 
ciple. 

The decision was made in the case of the 
Hocking A'alley Railroad Company, which 
was ordered to restore electric service on 
its line between Jackson and Hamden. Be- 
lieving itself to be w-ithin its rights, that 
corporation abandoned electricity as a mo- 
tive power and substituted steam. 

The railroad purchased the Jackson and 
Hamden traction line, and on the claim 
that the property was in need of repair de- 
cided to abandon the electric service and 
suljstitute a few freight trains drawn by 
steam engines. The miners along the line 
appealed to the State Utilities Commission, 
which held, in effect, that after a railway 
has gone into a community, offered a serv- 
ice, supplied it for years, and the com- 
munity has developed to the modern trend 
of the service, it cannot at will withdraw 
and leave that developed community with- 
out the service. 

It also affirmed the decision that railway 
systems iiia}^ not abandon one section of 
property and discommode a community be- 
cause that particular section is unprofitable, 
when the system as a whole is prosperous 
and profitable. 

In deciding the case the utilities commi.s- 
sion went furtlier in directory control than 
it or its predecessors have ever gone. It 
not only ordered that a service be given to 
a community, but designated the sort of 
service and specified in particular just what 
was to be done. 

Because of the far-reaching effect of this 
decision, the railroad has started appeal 
proceedings in the State Supreme Court. 



OLD LIGHTHOUSES. 



Speaking of old lighthouses on the coast 
of Nova Scotia, the Halifax Recorder says: 
On June 19 the lighthouse on Coffin's Isl- 
and was completely destroyed by lightning. 
It is of interest to mention the fact that 
the old lighthouse was established in 1812, 
and at the period in question was, other 
than the light of Sambro Island, the only 
lighthouse on the whole coast of Nova 
Scotia. 

The Sambro Island light was erected in 
1858 — nine years after Halifax was found- 
ed. Then in 1815 a light was erected on 
Manger's Beach, east side of entrance. 
The tower — Sherbrooke Tower — was 58 
feet above high water, and the light could 
be seen for ten miles. The lighthouse at 
Cape Canso was erected in 1815. It was 
75 feet above high water, and the light 
could be seen for 15 miles. The Digby or 
-Annapolis light was erected in 1817— that 
in Lunenburg Bay in 1832. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



ONE MAN'S VIEWS. 



"Rustem Bey Stands Pat. Will Resign 
Rather Than Retract." Thus a newspaper 
headline. 

Poor old Rustem Hey! He is evidently a 
firm believer in the wisdom of the obsolescent 
adage that those who live in glass houses 
should not throw stones. Being a Turk, and 
an ambassador to boot, he very properly 
resented the reiterated references in our 
newspapers to "Turkish massacres of Chris- 
tians." What eflfrontery! Hadn't Rustem 
Bey, good man, read in those very same pa- 
pers about our "lynching bees," our "Ludlow 
mas.sacre," and similar national pecadilloes? 
Didn't he know that poor "wops" and "hunk- 
ies" — "illiterate foreigners" — were almost 
daily shot and beaten up by our highly pol- 
ished private gunmen? Hadn't he read in 
our own prints how our gallant soldier boys 
in the Philippines were converting the natives 
into good citizens by means of the "water 
cure"? To be sure he had. And it made 
him sore to tiiink that we should find fault 
with his people because, forsooth, they are 
no better than we are. Had he stopped at 
that all wouUl have been well. But, not 
being a diplomat, albeit an ambassador, Rus- 
tem Bey made no bones about telling us how 
sore he felt. I'^or which he is to be politely 
asked to resign. That humiliating blot on 
our foreign diplomatic escutcheon, George 
Fred Williams, had to be offset somehow. 
With Rustem Bey safely sequestered amidst 
the placid enjoyments of his harem and his 
hookahs, Uncle Sam probably figures that he 
will be about horse and horse with efifete, 
monarchic Europe on the score of ambassa- 
dorial misfits. 



Those Ltold-you-sos who now so vehe- 
mently criticize the Socialists for their inabil- 
ity to prevent the present war are in the class 
of tiie scab in his attitude toward the union 
of his craft. As long as the union success- 
fully maintains a fair wage scale and reason- 
able hours of labor, the scab philosophically 
accepts the good things which the (union) 
gods provide. But if, perchance, the union 
sufifers a reduction in wages or an increase 
in working hours, Mr. Scab is Johnny on the 
spot with a howl that can be heard in the 
next county. 

"There, now," he cries with unholy glee; 
"there's your union for you. Didn't I always 
tell \ou that the unions were no good? They 
don't amount to a hill o' beans in hell, 'cept 
to get a feller in trouble. Don't talk to me 
any more 'bout your unions" — and so forth, 
and so on. 

Thus with the critics of Socialism. All 
their lives have they opposed it, belittled it, 
done their little damnedest to weaken it to 
the point of utterly destroying the move- 
ment. Then when a world crisis comes along 
of a magnitude never known before, these 
same kind critics hypocritically bemoan the 
fact that the Socialists proved themselves un- 
equal to the task of averting it. Talk about 
"colossal nerve"! The expression fits the 
critics of Socialism "like de paper mit de vail, 
Ikey." 



A bourbon has been defined as one who 
never learns and never forgets anything. 
Judged by that standard Mr. Roosevelt looms 
up as a bourbon of the first magnitude. All 
that sickening welter of blood and decaying 
corpses in Europe has not widened his out- 
look upon life by one single new idea. Rather 



has it made him more set than ever in his 
preposterous gospel of the big stick. He is 
still as unalterably and voluminously (at one 
dollar a word?j of the opinion that "pre- 
paredness for war is the surest guarantee 
of i^eace." Some bourbonism, eh? And to 
think that Mr. Roosevelt seriously poses not 
only as a progressive but as the leader of 
all tlie progressives ! Well, we have heard 
of Satan dressed in the livery of heaven, but 
this thing of a congenital bourbon masquer- 
ading as a progressive is decidedly "a new 
one." 



Say, suppose you had worked yourself up 
into a patriotic frenzy and shouted for war 
till you got hoarse ; and that war had been 
declared and was in full swing; and that then 
you found that the prisoners taken from the 
enemy were put to work for the State while 
you were tramping around half starved, vain- 
ly looking for a job — say, wouldn't that jar 
you? Well, that's ju.st what's happened in 
Germany according to Vorwaerts, the famous 
Socialist paper published in that country. As 
an illuminating instance of adding insult to 
injury, it is pretty near the limit even for 
modern capitalism. Hut, sad to relate, there 
are still enough mutts left in the world for 
cai)itali.sm to get away with that sort of thing 
for (|uite a while yet. 



Years ago some one — I think it was Inger- 
soll — said, "He who is satisfied with the 
world as it is to-day is not a good man." 

To which I wish to add that for the man 
who is satisfied with the world as it is at 
this present day, September, 1914, there is 
no adjective in the English language oppro- 
brious enough to do him justice. And yet, 
judging from the prosperity twaddle of the 
cai)italist press, there must be legions and 
legions of such men. I suppose, though, 
that, if only we knew the truth, they were 
meant to serve some useful purpose, just as 
fleas and bedbugs probably were. 



L'ntil both men and women learn to op- 
pose war effectually, the ruling class will con- 
tinue to force it upon us as often as it suits 
their purjiose. — J. Keir Plardie. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATfORN. 



I'Vom "independent" newspapers, Hearst 
loop the loops, political snipers, profit mon- 
gers, and the long ballot, good Lord deliver 



us. 



Swat the poll tax. While you're about it 
boost the Single Tax by voting right on the 
home rule in taxation amendment. 



"Peace on earth, good will to men." Who 
was it said something about a voice as of 
one crying in the wilderness? 



When in doubt vote for the eight hour 
and minimum wage bills. You can't go 
wrong there. 



War is business in uniform. Ihisiness is 
war in a sack coat. — Ex. 



War seldom enters but where wealth al- 
lures. — Dryden. 



Who wouldn't sell his farm and go to war? 



.\ rara avis — The dove of peace. 

F. H. Bl'KVKSON. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408'/2 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTL-^ND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54, 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



The "Union l<"(>rwaiil \[ovcmcnt" 
in Phila<lelpliia, Pa., is bringing forth 
gratifying results, in organizing a 
large number of workers in various 
crafts under the banner of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. 

By a vote of 125 to 13^ the con- 
vention of the Maryland State Fed- 
eration of Labor endorsed the liter- 
acy test section of the immigration 
bill, pending in the L'nited States for 
action. 

Opponents of child labor in Penn- 
sylvania claim that this is tlie only 
big industrial State wliich has refused 
to limit the working day of children 
to ciglit liours; that it employs more 
children under 16 years than any 
other State, and that its stand on 
child legislation is affecting the entire 
country. 

The Central Trades and Labor 
Union of St. Louis, Mo., has pro- 
tested against the European war in 
strong preambles and resolutions. 
The ruling powers are condemned 
for unloading the burdens of mili- 
tarism upon the working people, and 
the war is stigmatized as the great- 
est crime in civilization. Arbitration 
is favored as a method of settling 
international disputes. 

Brakemen and conductors cm- 
ployed by the Delaware and Hudson 
Railroad have received back pay due 
them through the agreement for 
higher wages that was secured after 
the strike of several months ago. 
Tt is claimed that the firemen and 
engineers received their awards re- 
cently. For some time after the 
strike the company failed to pay the 
increased wages, but the demands 
of these workers finally brought re- 
sults. 

Secretary-Treasurer Donnelly of 
the Ohio State Federation of Labor 
has issued a call for the thirty-first 
annual convention of that body, to 
be held in Youngstown, starting 
Monday, October 12. The call says: 
"We have a new Legislature to elect 
at this fall election, and the work of 
preparing labor's program of legis- 
lation for this new Legislature, 
which meets January 1, is the work 
cut out for this convention of the 
State Federation." 

Testifying before the Federal In- 
dustrial Relations Cotnmission, Mrs. 
Katherine P. Edson, a member of 
the California State Industrial Wel- 
fare Commission, declared that there 
are more women in Los .Angeles 
working outside their homes than 
there should be. Married women 
are not working because they want 
to, but to help husbands pay for 
homes, because the wages of the 
husbands will be inadequate. She 
says that while wives are working in 
stores their children are roaming the 
streets. 

The child labo'r law initiated by 
the Arkansas State Federation of 
Labor has been adopted by the voters 
of Arkansas after a campaign that 
attracted national interest. This act 
provides that a child, to work in 
any occupation, must have attended 
school four years and be more than 
fourteen years of age. Children under 
sixteen cannot be employed in any 
hazardous occupation, and the State 
Board of Health is authority to 
rule on the hazards of various lines 
of work. Children under sixteen are 
limited to eight hours work a day, 
while for those between 16 and 18, 
nine hours is the limit. Children 
under sixteen are barred from pro- 
fessional theatrical performances. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 

DAY AND NIGHT 



202-4 GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DOCK 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE. Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by tlie Seattle 
Postoflice, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to 
call or have their mail forwarded during 
that period, they should notify the Agent 
to hold mail until arrival. 

Matson, Eric 
MoPherson, Rolurt 
Mikkelsen. K. -1620 
Moen, Robert 
Mon-son. Martin 
Muir, James 
Muins, F. W. P. 
Muller, Willie 
Ma.TS, R. 
Marx, Rhor\'ald 
McDonald. Wni. 
Manson, Sven 
Nelson. Rernt 
Nielsen. H. J. 
Ness. I.ouis 
Ness, Carl 
Nielsen. P. I>. 
Nashis, P. 
Norlin, Geo. 
Orstad, Christ 
Osterman. Oscar 
Olsen. P.. -.■>!>7 
Olson, C. -5S4 
Olsen. A. M. 
Olsen, Martin 
Olsen. O. P. -1141 
Paaso. A. 
Petterson, Harry 
Petersen, John 
Petersen. Olaf B. 
Peterson. Victor 
Primrose. H. T... 
Onisley. R. K. 
Rasmussen, Rasmus 
RnsmuRsen. E. S. 
Rasmussen. Ol.ii 
Rolime. Otto 
Rolide. Fritz 
Rose. W, H. 
Samiielsen. Hugo 
Shepard. Peter 
Rimmlnghjem. O. 
Saimders. R. 
Stover. >Tarrv 
Stuhr. TI. 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Svensen. Ted 
Samiielsen Harold 
Smith. Talne 
Soderberg, A. 
Staff. C. 
Strand. C 
Strauss. P 
Talhom. .T. 
Thorsen, Toneer 
Thorsen. Jo'innnes 
Thompson. Willie 
Totz. n. 
Tabline". M. 
T.^bti. Hialmnr 
Tomis. F'-anVt 
A'aldlev. P. 
■U'enik'^e. A. 
"\\'ee. ^W. 
TBViler T. J 
W^ilkhelm. E 
■U'iekstrom. /*"ton 
Zimmerman, Thos. 



Alirahamosn. Berner 
Allen, John 
Alonzo, J. 

Anderson, A. -1S21 
Andersen, Ragnvald 
Aylward, J. 
Alfredsen. Andrew 
Albers, Geo. 
Anderson. Julius D. 
Benter, Henry 
Bruce, Robert 
Bode. Fred 
Bye. Sigurd 
Backman, F. J. 
Bahr, 'Walter 
Brodie, W. G. 
Carlson, J. -861 
Campbell, Frank 
Daly. W. O. 
Dekk:er, O. 
Die Christ O. 
D. M. 

Davis. F. A. 
Doddy, C. W. 
Engstrom, Carl 
Engstrom, Carl 
Erfltsen, C. 
Erikson, Erik 
Eriksen, .John 
Fenes, Ing\ald 
Foss, A. F. 
Frammis, Ivar 
Oar.lner. .Tames 
Gundersen, D. 
Geiger. .Toe 
Graae. P. C. 
Hacklin, C. E. 
TIag.strom. Victor 
Uae.ster. Otto 
Halversen. Hans 
Hansen, Nils -2072 
Helstrom, J. A. 
Hansen. Henry 
Hellisen, H. 
Herman. Axel 
Hager. P. B. 
.Tohnson. Julius 
.Tohansen. Arvid 
Johanrsen. Geo. W, 
Jacobsen, Johan 
.Tneobsen. Oscar 
.Tohnsen. Ernest 
.Tnhanson. Kniit 
.Tobnson. Jacob 
.Tortrensen. Agge 
Kallio. F. 
Kroiiss, Ernest 
Kristiansen, Tryg\'e 
Kruger. .1. 
T.arsen. Hans -1505 
T.iune'strom. Steen 
T.uwold. Nils 
T a nib Herbert 
T,of. Oscar 
T.orentse". John 
Too. E Van 
T.underen. Carl 
T ntten. T. 
Markman. H. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
cominunicate with his sister Minni, 
who has iinportant news from home. 
Address, Mrs. Minni Hall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Walter Jorpeson Clanp, born in 
Aaland Yetta. Ostro Yetta, is in- 
quired for by his uncle. John Clanp. 
Address Coast Seainen's Journal. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS. HATS AND SHOES 
At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

( 220-222 ) 

Two StoreS| 103-105-107 J ^*' Ave. So. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



H. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

SEATTLE, WAi^H. 

Next door to Master Mates and Pilots 

Conducted by CAPT. H. S. SMITH, 

Who for four years was Assist. Ins. of 

Steamboats in Seattle 

Tacoma Letter List. 

Anderson, John I^ine. Wiktor 

Almkvist, Emil Melgail, M. 

Corty, Casar Murphy, Daniel 

Dobbin, Harry Nllsson, Teodor 

Doering, E. W. Nielsen, C. V. 

Englund, Gust E. Olsen, Martin E. 

Hansen, Johannes Paterson, John 

Iversen, Iver Pettersson, C. H. 

Johansson, Charles Voss, H. 
Johannsen, Christian Whermann, William 

Karthauser, Otto Wilbrandt, Harry 
Linca, W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuana" in September, 
1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Littra B. Nystrama St., Goteborg, 
Sweden.— 5-13-14. 

Carl Julius Carlson, born in Swe- 
den in 1877, is inquired for by his 
mother. There is about $2000 due 
him from his father's estate. Last 
heard of in September, 1902, on the 
Atlantic Coast. Previously sailed on 
the "Cliflford" between St. Johns and 
New York. Address Fru Sophia 
Carlson, Klubbegard, Hallands Lan, 
Heberg, Sweden. 

Samuel Dickson, a seaman, aged 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Oscar Osolin, John Lind, M. 
Elone, John Anderson, Thomas Puk- 
ki, Alex. Tuominen, Chas. Grouberg, 
who were on board the steamer "Fi- 
fild" April 7, 1913, please communi- 
cate with the Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

Willy Blunel, a native of Germany, 
is inquired for by his uncle. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify W. Stieglitz. Central Hotel, 
Hoboken, N. J.— 9-30-14. 



EureKa, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ^ Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY &. YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
•Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
I.ager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE~MEAL 

eureka" CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAIIAMSEN. Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms. Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspa[)ers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D, St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eu eka, Cal., Letter List 



Ereksen, Anton 
Ellison, Sam 
Englund, Gust 
Hansen, Harald 
Hansen. Harry 
-1827 (Photo) 



Haldorsen, Adolf 
Ingebrethsen, Alfred 
Lawrence, Harry 
Lomas, Richard 
Thorssen, Fred'k. N. 



STATEMK.N'T <JF THE OWNERSHIP, 

m.\nai;kment. riRcrL.\TiON. etc.. 

REQITIKKD BY THE ACT OF AUGCST 
L'4. 1!U2. of Ciiast Seamen's Journal, pub- 
lished weekly at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, for October 1. 1914. 

Name of Editor. Paul Scharrenberg, 
San Francisco. Cal. 

Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, 
San Franrlsco, Cal. 

Business Manager, T. M. Holt, San 
Francisco. Cal. 

Publisher, Sailors' Tnlon of the Pa- 
eifiic. San Francisco Cal. 

Owners: (If a corporation, give Its 
name and the names and addresses Of 
stockholders holding 1 per cent, or more 
of total amount of stock. If not a cor- 
poration, give names and addresses of 
individual owners.) Sailors' Union of the 
Paelflc, San Francisco. Cal. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other speurit.v holders, holding 1 per 
cent, or more of total amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities: (If there 
are none, so state.) None. 

Average number of copies of each 
issue of this publication sold or dis- 
tributed, through the malls or other- 
wise, to paid subscribers during the six 
months preceding the date shown above. 
(This information is required from dally 
newspapers only.) 

T. M. HOLT. Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 
21st day of September, 1914. 
(Seal) CHARLES P. O'CONNOR, 

Notary Public. 1217 Market Street. 

My commission expires April 12, 1917. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



Portland, Ore. 

wTTToIhnson 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office : 
41 UNiON AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



A. -1645 
Gust. 



Anton 

Mike 
Karl W. 
Ed. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 
FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Karlson, August 
Kluge, Frank 
Kelly, Palric 
l^aine, Frank 
Larson, John 
Lewik, Karl 
Uutzen, Wald. 
Matlison, Nils 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Maass, R. 
Meckerman, Ernest 
Marx, Tliorwald 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Moberg, Karl 
Nelsseii, C. J. 
Nilsson, Axel 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Narbeig, John 
Ulsen, Artliur 
Olsen, Ansgar 
Olson, J. W. 
Olsen, John Andreas 
Phillip, Max 
Petterson, Einar 
Peterson, Hans 
Petersson, M. 
Pettersson, W. H. 
Pelz, Gottfried 
PolUand, Max 
I'etersen, Jolm 
Rautio, Jacob 
Keincke, Herman 
Rhodes, F. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Simens, O. Li. 
Scott, James 
Schulz, Alfred 
Wieprecht, Ernest 
Welsen, J. 
Walter, John 
Woldhouse, John 



Anderson, 
Anderson, 

-1808 
Andresen, 

-1635 
Andersen, 
Bergman, 
Berglund, 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Biun, Mathias 
Bulls, Ernest 
Bakkersen, Peter J. 
Carlsen, J. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Carlson, C. Brland 
Campbell, Frank 
Dahl, Henry 
Deswert, William 
Day, Aca 
Danielsen, Nils J. 
Edstrom, John 
Erinan, A. 
Ekham, Frans 
England, E. 
Freitag, Franz 
Fristrom, S. 
Geiger, Josef 
Gordia, Piet 
Gynther, John 
Gravier, Eugene 
Greil, Ben 
Hansen, Max O. 
Henriksson, William 
llellaian, Albin 
Henricks, Woldemar 
Hedlund, Albert 
Holm, Aage 
Huneig, Hans 
Hansen, H. F. C. C. 
Johansen, Chris 
Jansson, L. -21G6 
Johansson, Arvo 
Jacobson, A. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
tlie same as a postage stamp, li a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 




filftTL 



him. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, -1118 
Arnell, John 
Behn, Alfred 
Bowen, J. J. 
Butler, J. E. 
Bergman, L. J. 
Christensen, Albert 
Carlstrom, John 
Debus, F. 
de Dange, Ingolf 
Doyle, W. 
Ernandes, Frisco 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Forde, S. C. 
Graf, Otto 
Gronros, Oswald 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Husche, H'y 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
Jacobson, Arthur 
Johansen, Hans 
Johansen, A. H. 
Jeutaft, Sigurd 
Kallas, Alek 
Kristiansen, -1093 
Koski, Chas. 
Kustel, V. J. 
Loining, Hermand 
Lengtssen, Gottfried 
Lorsin, G. L. 
I.,arsen, Hans 
McLean, H. 
Martin, James 
Mackenzie, Hector 
G. 



Munsen, Fred 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nilsen, Alf. W. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsen, Oswald -1059 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olasen, Chas. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Pettersen, Olaf 
Peterson, Nels 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Roberts, I. 
Sim, Gunder 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Sormato, Matti 
Strom, C. 
Schultz 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Vilen, T. 
Walder. Olsen N. 
Zebe, G. V. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Solberg, Peter 
Stanners, W. S. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, age about 44, is en- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
"i^rancisco, Gal. 7-22-14 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand; 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News Q Drug Co. 

Headquarters 
SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. WISKAH STREET, ABERDEEN 
SMOKE 

"ThinK of Me" and 
"White Squadron" 

CIGARS 

Made by 
L. L. MALEY, Aberdeen, Wash. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Headquarters for 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 
401 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

420'/2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS. 



LEADING JEWELERS 



Have Moved to 

318 E. HERON STREET 

Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

ABERDEEN - - WASHINGTON 



Phone 342 



Box 843 



HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 




•■">^- 



fNAVMTlON 



'1 



LL_ 



iMmmum 



This Book Free 

If you want to know more 
about Navigation, we will 
send this book free to you. 
It tells how young men have 
advanced to better positions 
— how they have climbed 
from small beginnings to 
the highest positions of 
master and officers of sea- 
going craft. It is an inspir- 
ing booklet. 

Mark and mail this coupon 
today. 



international correspondence schoois * 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. * 

I'Ic.TSC send me your lrc<? booklet. expUlnlne * 
Courses In Ocean, Coast, and Lake Navieation. ^ 



♦ Name_ 



I * St.& No.^ 

i ♦ c^^y 



Home News. 



. Siaie_ 



When 11. Amick of Shiro, Tex., 
cut into a plug of chewing tobacco 
he found a human finger which had 
evidently been cut off in the factory 
which manufactured the tobacco. 

According to Stephen Birch, man- 
aging director of the Morgan-Gug- 
genheim Alaska Mining Syndicate, 
the greatest gold field in history has 
been dicovered in Alaska at Broad 
Pass. The ledges are from 100 to 
2,000 feet wide and assay from $15 
lo $250 a ton. 

Just before the Red Cross steam- 
ship was about to sail from New 
\'ork protest was received against 
her crew, which was composed 
mainly of Germans. As a result of 
the complaint a new crew was ob- 
tained after a wait of several days, 
and when the Red Cross sailed she 
Iiad a full complement of Americans 
on Ijoard. 

Representatives of every large 
railroad in the country have appealed 
to President Wilson to aid the rail- 
roads to tide over the financial dif- 
ficulties arising from the war in 
luirope. The executives are also 
anxious to overcome the prejudice 
against railroads among the people. 
Postponement of consideration by 
Congress of the railway security bill 
is particularly asked. 

By a decision of the Supreme 
Court of Massachusetts, the Institute 
(if Technology will receive a be- 
<iuest of $750,000 made by the late 
Cliarles II. Pratt, a lawyer of Bos- 
ton, to found a school for naval 
arcliitecture and marine engineering. 
The will was contested by cousins 
of Mr. Pratt, who claimed that it 
was not executed according to law. 
Instead of writing his name at the 
•Ijottom of the will, Mr. Pratt wrote 
it on the margin. 

California now ranks fifth among 
all the States in volume of postal 
savings deposits. According to a 
Postoffice Department statement, 
there is now $3,074,347 postal savings 
funds on deposit in California post- 
offices. New York, Pennsylvania, 
Ohio and Illinois are the only States 
with larger deposits. Final figures 
arc not available for San Francisco, 
but the indicated increase is approxi- 
mately $65,000, The total deposits 
for all the States are $40,000,000. 

Roger Sullivan, opposed by Sec- 
retary Bryan and Governor Dunne, 
won the Democratic nomination for 
the United States Senate from Illi- 
nois by a plurality of 60,000. The 
Republicans renominated Senator L. 
Y. Sherman. James T. McDermott, 
who resigned while under a cloud, 
was nominated by the Democrats 
of the Chicago stock yards district. 
"Uncle Joe" Cannon was nominated 
y the Republicans in the eigliteenth 
district. William B. McKinley and 
George K. I'"oss, former members, 
were nominated. 

Five out of the 120 enlisted men 
who took the first examination un- 
der the new law permitting enlisted 
men to enter Annapolis, passed the 
mental examination. The law pro- 
vides that fifteen enlisted men, to be 
selected by competitive examination, 
shall enter the Naval .Academy each 
year. This law was enacted June 
30, and the examination was or- 
dered for August 3, giving only 
about a month for preparation for 
the examination. The five men who 
passed this year, four seamen and a 
musician, will be examined physical- 
ly, and if found qualified will at once 
enter the Academy as midshipmen. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

52 EAST STREET, Opp. Ferry Depot, San Francisco 
JOE WEISS Telephone Kearny 3771 



Union Made Shoes 

FOR MEN EXCLUSIVELY 
STORE! NEW GOODS! 

NEW MACHINERY! 

Call and Inspect our new up-to-date quarters 



By the posting of a $50,000 bond 
by August Belmont, American repre- NEW 
sentative of the Rothschilds of Paris, 
the steam yacht "Eros," which was 
recently seized by U. S. Marshal Repairing done while you wait by the latest machinery 




Phone Douglas 198 



under a writ of attachment, is now 
at liberty to leave liiis country. The 
yacht was chartered l)y Eugene Hig- 
gins, a l)anker, for a trip around the 
world, but on the outbreak of the 
war the French crew left the yacht 
to return to France. Mr. Higgins 
was compelled to charter another 
yacht. He applied for a writ of at- 
tachment against the "Eros" pending 
his suit for $46,000 damages. 

It is impossible from the accounts 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company for the twelve months 
ending June 30 to ascertain exactly 
what the company's steamers have 
earned. It would appear, however, 
that, apart from the company's Pa- 
cific coast steamers, its ocean steam- 1 5^^ Francisco Letter List. 

ers earned last year $783,678, the net ' ,. ^ »i, o ^ , ^ c-„n„ .• 

•' I Letters at the San Francisco Sailors 

earnings of the Pacihc coast steam- ^-nion Office are advertised for three 
ers being included with the earnings months only and will be returned to the 
of the hotels, etc. The company's Post Office at the expiration of four 

ocean, lake and river steamers stand "^°"^h«, ^^"^ f-"^^ °' delivery 

., Members whose mail is advertised In 

in the books at $24,171,162, while ^^^^^^ columns should at once notify 
advances to lines and steamers under i. m. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
construction stand at $35,571,960. |san Francisco, to forward same to the 

A new steamship f..r the New ^ f""-^ °f their destination. 
York-Mediterranean .service of the -\abatos. W. O.-1780Anderson, A. -1447 
Cunard-.\nchor Line 



Work called for and delivered 
We use only the best leather market aflfords 
We can save you money by purchasing your next pair of shoes from us. 




Paulsen, Alex. 
Paultln. Martin 
Pearson, Victor 
Pedersen, Carl 
Pcdersen, Elllf 
Pedersen, Hans 
Pedersen. O. -1392 



Petersen, S. A. 
Peterson, Johan 
Peterson, L. -1398 
Peterson. Soren 
Pettersen. F. -1526 
Pettersen, Karl 
Pettersson. E. -1437 



Pedersen, Petter A.Petz, Fritz 
Pederson, Sofus R. Plllson. Eduard 
Peru. Gust Porath, Ben 

Peters. .T. Prannels. W. 

Petersen, -1564 Prinz. Carl 

Petersen, John A. Ptnron, J. E. 
Petersen. Olav -1595 Puze, A. 
Petersen, Otto 

Raalsen. Fred Roberts, John 

Ramberg, B. A. Robinsboom, E. 

Rasmussen. Andrew Rosenblad, Axel 
Rasmussen, John Rosendahl, Knud 
Raymond. Frank L. Rosenthal, John 



UNION LABEL USED 



NOVELTY TAILORING CO. 

Third Floor Phelan Building 



760 MARKET STREET 



WORKSHOP 

Room 325 



CUTTING DEPT. 
Room 327 



SALES DEPT. 
Room 329 



Represented by F. SELANDPIR, Assistant Secretary 



, Abolin, Chris. Anderson. E. -1781 

was launched Abniliamsen. Anton Anderson. Edvard 



•Vdulfsson, F. H. 



September 3 from the yards of Alex- iClbertlon.' Chris 



ander Stephen & Company, on the AIIjoos, Arne 

„, , ' , , , f 1 Alexander, James 

Clyde, and as the vessel left the Allen, James 

"Tnc Amundsen, Albert 
^""'Andersen. A. 

Andersen, Andrew 



ways she was christened the 
cania." She is of 14,000 tons bur- 
den, 548 ft. long, 66 ft. wide and 
has a depth of 45 ft. She will have 
accommodation for 2(X} cabin, 250 
second cabin and 2,000 third-class 
passengers, and is a sister ship of 
the "Transylvania," which was 
launched in May. Both ships will 
have geared turbine machinery. 
The number of ships which 
tered Lisbon in 1913 was 2,884 
ing only 



.Xndf rsen, 
Andersen, 
Andersen. 
Andersen. 



Anton 
Ariiieldt 
Nela 
Peter 



en- 
be- 



Baars, Hans 
Backman, Paul 
Bakkenson, P. J. 
Bakmyhr, Gustav 
Baro, Severin, S. 
Bauer, Andrew 
Beck Johannes 

I Behr. H. 
Behrend, Fred 

I Beimeir, Peter 
Benson, Gus 
Benson, Severin 

' Berg. John 
slight increase on the Berghalm, Edward 
1 u- 1 . J • inn Tu Bertelsen. Alf. 

number which entered in 1912. Ihe Bjorklund, Eric 

total tonnage, however, went up very BJorseth, Knut 

I Blanco, D. 
being 6,398,025 tons, nuvnert, Willy 
with 5,375,511 tons, Gallon Josh. 

Campbell, D. C. 
which shows that the size of steam- 1 Campbell. Geo. 

. J.] • • r>c ii Cariera, Pete 

ers is steadily increasing. Of these, carlson, A. A. 

2,675 were steamers and 209 sailing Carlson. H. 

, Carlson, John 

vessels. Forty more German steam- Carlson, Joseph 

Carlson. P. S. 



considerably, 
as compared 



ers called in 1913 than in 1912, and 
8 British steamers less, the total 
numbers and tonnages of the two 
countries (steam and sail) being as 
follows: British, 838 vessels of 2,- 
232,091 tons; German, 730 vessels of 
2,045,223 tons. 

Commander J. Foster Stackhtjusc, 
R. N. R., now in Washington, is 
seeking American co-operation in a 
seven-year ocean charting expedi- 
tion in the "Discovery," the vessel 
in which Captain Scott made his 
ill-fated .\ntarctic tri]). It is pos- 
sible that one or more naval of- 
ficers representing the Hydrographic 
Office will be detailed to accompany 
the expedition. Its purpose, Com- 
mander Stackhouse explained, is to 
remove from the 



Carron, Edward 

Carry. Peter A 

Christensen. Albert 

Dalen. Wm. K. 

Dauhbs, Paul 

Pavis. Frank A. 

Davis. Gala 

Debus, Fredrick 

De Roos. J. 

Eaton. William H. 

Eby, Ivar. D. 
i Eckhoff, Otto 
I Edolf, K. 
I Kggers, John 

Ehlert. Ernest 

Kinardt. John 

Ellis, E. 

Rll.sworth. James 

Elofson, John 

Farnen, M. S. 

Fiedler, Emil 

Finn. Chas 

Fischer, Wilhelni, 
-707 

Gabrilsen, Edling 
(!ahy, Jim 
Gasch, William 
Geary, Albert 
Gilholm, Albin 
l< 



t).,„:fi,. .,„,! «»i,„, ' Ciars, Petrus 
Pacific and other cjasdal, Elling 



Anderson, Emanuel 
-Anderson, Johannes 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, S, M. 
Anderssen, H. -1477 
.Vndcrssen, S. P. 
Andersson, A. -1819 
Andreassen, Morgan 
Antonsen, Herman 
Asp. Gus. J.,. 
Attel, Alf 
Blucker, John 
Boers, M. 
Bohn, Franz 
Borgen, John 
Bowman, William G. 
Brander, William 
Brandt. Birgpr 
Brandt, Oscar 
Bravieh, Johan 
Brennan, Patrick 
Brennet, Waldemar 
Brennon. I^eo 
Brushard, Ewalt 
Bryan, John 
Brynjulfson. Halvar 
Burndez, Charles 
Buse, D. 
Bye, Sigurd 
Bynum, Joe 
Christiansen, Peder 
Cherniawski, M. 
Classen, Henry 
Clausen. Chr. 
Cockell, Rrank 
Connolly, Obirt 
Connolly, Stephen 
Conlreras, ,Julius 
Costa, Casimiro 
Cord, P. 
Crosman, Geo. 

Deswert, William 
Digman, Carl A. 
Douglas, George 
Dowe, John 
Dreyer, Carl 
Durhalt. Harry 
Elone. Emanual 
Ericson, Gust. 
Eriksen, Bernhard 
Erikson. -880 
Erikson, E. 
Erikson, G. 
Eriksson, Artur 
Eskildsen, Lars B. 
Eskildsen. Nils P. 

Fisiher. I.ars B. 
Fitzpa trick, P. 
Folvik. Lewis 
Eraser, Thomas 
French, Jack 

Griffin. Jas. 
Grlgolelt, Ed. 
Gronnevick, Isack 
Gulbranson, BJorn 
Gunder.=pn. Christ 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gustafson. Gus 
Gustavsen, Olaf 



Hogan, A. 
Hogelund. Andrew 
Hollen, Carl 
I tollman, Al.irtin 
Holm, Carl 
Holm, S. 
Hoist, K. 
Ikivalko 
Illig, Gus 
Jacobsen, Jolin 
Jacobsen, Martin 
J ago, C. 

'.(akolisen, Jakob 
Jamisch. Ed W. 
Jens, Otto 
Jensen, c 
.lensen, Fredrick 
Jensen, Halvor 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Harry 
Jensen, Just 
lensen, William 
Johannesen, Einar 
Johansen. Alf. 

Johannessen, Anton Johnson 
Johansen, Carl -804 John.son 



Holtberg, Ernest 
Hovring, H. J. 
Hubertz, Emll 
Hultberg, ICrnest 
Hubner, C. F. W, 
Hyde, Carl 

Isakson, Kail 
Iversen, Iver 
Johansen, S. W. 
Johansen, Thos. W. 
.lohanson, Edwin 
Johanson, Nathanael 
.lohanssen, Carl 
Johanssen, Emll 
Johnsen, G. -950 
Johnson. A. R. 
Johnson, D. 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, F. 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnsen, John A. 
Johnson, Pete 
Johnson, Robert 

R. W. 

Steve 



Johansen. Eduard John.sun, William 
Johansen, Johan Jokstad, Sigurd O. 
Johansen, John -2309 Jones, Berthon 



ocean charts the numerous P. D. if-ordon, Geo. _....^ •,-'•':' 

,,.„„„ , Granstrom. Nestar Gutman, Charles 

and h. I), marks, which indicate Gravit Carl 



I 



"position doubtful" and "existeiK-e Haave. Norvald 

doubtful" in regard to rocks 

and small islands. With changes in 



rfsfc ' "aE^sar. Fred 
■^^^'^ Hall. S. C. 



Hansen. Oscar 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hanson, Olc R. 
Hallen, Victor Han.son, O. 

, t • , , I tfalvarsen, H. Harmening. Fred 

trade routes resulting from the open- >inlvorsen, Olaf Hartog, John 

ino- nf the P-inama Taml Tom Hammargren, Oscsr Ha.skins, C. 
ing 01 tne 1 anama canai com- ^ j:fj,„^ ^ p, Hafgaard. Hans 

mander Stackhouse said that it was Hannus, Alex. fj^^^-. Arthur 

, , , Hansen, Bernhard Heckel, Max 

important to have every rock and Hansen C. T. Heidai. Trvgve 

reef in the Pacific charted. The J^«--; ^;J^,^, 

expedition will set out next March Hansen, Jerry 

' ... , • , , , Hansen, J. -2156 

and will cover about two hundred Hansen, Marlus 

and fifty thousand miles. Hansen. Olaf''" 



Helpap, August 
Henry. H A. 
Hensen, J. 
Herman. Jack 
Hermansson, Gustaf 
Hiks, Gustav 
Hiike, Karl 



Johansen. Louis 
Kalber, Albin 
Kalkin, Fred 
Kallio, Frans 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kallos, Alex. 
Kalnin, E. 
Kalot, A, 
Kargen. Fred 
Kaiisen, Hans 
Karlsen, Martin 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Kasen, Frudu 
Kaspersen, 
Kayser. C. T. 
Kearns, Nic 
Keating, R. 
Lacy, Thos. E. 
Lahke, J. J. 
Lala, August 
Lapschies, Edward 
Larsen, A. L. 
Larsen, Alf 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, Georg L, 
Larsen, Hans 
Larsen, T. 
Larson, Axel 
Larson, C. 
r.a.rson. H. P. 
Lass, Johan 
Laws, Harry 
Leckscher, Henry 
Macrae, Alexander 
Magmussen, 
Maimstrom, 
Maltti, J. 
Manss, Fred 



Jorgensen, Aage 
Kelly, Edward 
Kiesow, Paul 
Kindlund, Otto 
Kine, Conrad 
Klebingat. Fred 
Klette, Ernst 
Knudsen, Lauritz 
Kohne, Ernst 
Kolhe. Albin 
Kolberg, Arvid 
Konopacki, Martin 
Kristiansen. L. P. 
Henrik Kroeger, Henry 
Krutman. K. 
Kuhlmann, Louis 



Reoil. J. W 

Kegan. John 

Reine. G. 

Kicbardson. E, O. 

Richter, Niels 

Kimmer, Chas. 

.''aarinen, Werner 

Saderlund. Uno 

Sager, Ed. 

Salger, Julius 

Salvesen. S. 

Sancherd, Vincent 

Sander, Robert 

Sandsepp, O. 

Sandstrom. O. H . Standquist. Louis 



Rosenquist, A. 
Ruise. — 
Rundquist, O. 
Rutte, Peter 
Ryersen, Geo. 

Snell, Adolf 
Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Sorby, Olaf 
Sorensen. C. J. T. G. 
Sorensen, James 
Sorensen. Peter 
Speller, H. z 

Stallbaum, Eberhard 



-1684 
Lee. Ernest 
Lewis, Roy B. 
Lidsten, Chas, 
Lindgren, Richard 
I.indrotli, Carl 
Line, W. 
Llnhqulst, G. 
Lohne, E. 
Lolning, Herman 
Lorense, W, 
Love. S. C. 
Luberg, Willem 
Lunilberg, Thort-lcii 
T-iuid, Wiliam 
Lundblad, iSrnst 
McKeatlng, R. 

Magnu.sMcMahon, J. T. 

C. A. McMalo, Victor 
Mever, W. 
Miller. Christ 



Markley. Paul Miller, Fred 

Markman, Harry Miller, Herman 
Markmann, Heinrich Mogelberg, Harry 
Markus, Gotfred Mohr, Ernst 

Martenz, Paul -2262Monsen. Martin 
Martens, Paul Moore, C. C. 

Masters, C. Morris, Benjamin 

Martensen. T. C.-2191 Morrison, Wm. 
Mathlsen, Charley Moure, Peter 
Mathlsen. Christian 
Matsiin, O. -204fi 



R. 



Mayes, J. B. 
McConnell. David 
McCort, Jop 
Nar, P. Niels 
Narup, Carl 
Nelsen. Ernest C. 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson, W. 
Neumann, J. 
Newbert, Herman 
Nlel.^en, Carl 
Nielsen, Harald 

.John 
Nielsen, Ingolf 
Oberg, C. W. 
Oberg, Mauris 
O'Connor. W. F. 
Olmann, P. 
Olsen, Alfred 
Olsen, Charles 
Olsen. Ferdinand 
Olsen, Geo. 
nison. Geo. W. 
Olsen, Gus 
Olsen, Olai 
Olsen, Olav 
Olsen, O. -1283 
Olsen. Otto 
Olsen. Oswald 
OKsen, Robert -1221 
Palm, A. 
Palmer, P. 



Mueller, A. 
Mudda. A. 
Muircheek, W. 
Muller. Fred 
Murray, C. P. 
Nielsen, L. 
Nilsen, J. A. 
Nilson. Kaenard 
Nllsson. Johan 
Nilsson, -1141 
Nordin. Gus 
Nordstrom. Wiotor 
Nurken, H. 
Nurml. Victor R. 
Nylander, Edv. R. 
Nyman. A. 
Nyman, Oskar 
OKson, E. G. 
Olson, Janies 
Olson, M. 
Olson, Marlus 
Olson, S. 
rilsnn. S-im 
Olsson, B. O. S. 
Olsson, G. B 
Olsson, N. -502 
Ondrasek, Ralph 
O'Nell, James 
Osalin, Oscar 
Osman, T. B. 
Osterhoff, HHinrirh 
Ovarnstrom, H. 

Parrell. William 
Partaner, Johan 



.Sanlos, Ben 

Scheffler, Samuel 

Srhmidt, Berhard 

.■-^.liroder. E. W. 

Scliultz, F. J. 

Sihulze, Paul 

S.<jU, Emil 

SeidPl, Willi 

Kiiffert, Johannes 

Shallgreen, John 

Shem, A. 

Sherry, J. H. 

Shields. J. J. 

Skoglund, Harry 

Skellerup, A. 

Slenning, Joseph 

.SnialmbPrg, Otto 

Smith, D. 

Smith, Percy S. 

Tamanen, Erland 

'I'amman, Krlspin 

Tasnase, E. 

Thearin. John E. 

Tho, Johan 

Thomas. Edward 

Thompson, E. 

I'dekull, C. Ulmar, John 

Uhlman, Axel 

Vanderberg, Geo. Velson, Frank 

VangoUler, William Verfard, Frank 

Van Katwijk, J. W.Voorhies, Firman 



Stein, Emil 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Sterling, H. 
Strasdin, Hans 
Strauss, Walter 
Strom, Kahl 
Swansen, O. 
flwanson, Ben 
Swanson, Jack 
Swanson, John 
Swansson, Oskar 
Swarllev. Norman 
Sund. Aleks 
Sundl, Oscar 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Snndharm, Fred 
Sweeting, J. B. 
Svensson. S. E. -2675 

Thompson. Thomas 
Thoren, Gus 
Tliksman, Chas. 
Tdllefsen, Hans 
Tommala, Vaino 
Tuchel, Gustav 



Wagner, W. 
Waidhouse. John 
Wald, Olaf 
Wallgren. I. M. 
Walsh. B. 
Wanderli.l, J. 
Welson. R. 
Welure, J. 
Westgaard, John 
Westman. A. 
Weyer, Paul 

Zankert, Karl 
Zechel, Walter 
Zoerb, Walter 

PACKAGES. 
Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Anderson, A. Laas, J. 

.Anderson, Andrew Laydon, D. 
Anderson, Axel Lundberg. Oskar 

Athanasele, DemetreMehrtens, H. K. 



Wlback, Walter 
WMf kstrom, .Antone 
Wilhelmsen. C. 
Wi Harts. Fred 
Wlllert, Charles 
Wilsen, Billy 
Wimmer, Geo. 
Winblad, Martin 
Winter, Harry 
Wittenborn, Hans 
Wortman, Wm. 

Zornlg. Harry 
Zwakten, Ruflolph 



Beling, Oscar 
Carter. H. 
Ceelan, John 



Miles, I. P. 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen, Carl -1101 



Christoffersen, Olaf Olsen. Marlnus 



Rllefsen, Otto 
Kriksnn, E. 
Finnelly, Wm. 
Hansen. Karl 
Hansen. Marlus 
Hendriksen, Hag- 
bart 



Olsen, W. S. -1229 
Raasch, O. 
Rarly, Frans. 
Rasmussen. Emll 
Rathke, Relnhold 
Relursen, A. L, 
Roslln. Robert 



Heningway, George Schroder, Aug. 



Hoffman, J. 
Iversen, Iver 
Johansen, Emil 
Johnson, R. W. 
.lorgensen, Oluv 
Klette, E. F. 
Knappe. .\d. 



Sorensen, Pete 
Summers, J. J. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Wakely. R. E. 
Walters, Albert B. 
Wurthman, W. L. 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to 1. N. HYLEN, 49 Clay St. 

TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET, near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen. No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT -LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and IVIarket Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of tlie Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches tor Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere street. 

June 30, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,857.717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office Hours. 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

For the six months ending June 30, 
1914, a dividend to depositors of i% per 
annum was declared. 

Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washingfton 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open ail night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Telephone Kearny 1534 

'Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



\ 
"Ale 

AND 

Porter 



Union 

MADE 

5eer 




<T«4S^) Of America ^^c^ 

COPTRICHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^r» m /f ^'•^V W ^^ W^ r^ g> See that this label (in light 
A*^ 1^/ 1 ■ #1^. i~^^B^t ^^^blue) appears on the box in 
^^-'-''^ *^— ^■^*— **^ ^^-^ which you are served. 



Issued by Autliocity of ine Cigar MmeiS lm«fnational Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

Shrt Snlif if;S "« u^ o^jn cwitjin.d mthu vb hm bw nxM b)t MiS-Ocs mnM 

amilBCflortHtaGAfiMMEra'lNTlBIIAIIWULWOIIrfAm/xj, jnwjjiizaWBlJevotedhittiejd 

vdncauent ol tiie MORAl MATUilAljnd INIUIICTUAI WllfAM Of IHC OWX ISt>i(iw« •• rjcoMtt 

UieM Ci^u^ to all siTNAfln l^[OMho</t Um miiU 

' AUWiugaaMUiwontluUM ail twpuubtdKcodnj tola* 



nc 
»»■ siaiiE 



* ^iHuaw m-/.*mti^f w ■■■•■ 

y ctfru<ii 



ofMmeheA 



i:^iur.^tOi'Jifia>, ^ «»u.\'«*»*89%;S?B»y*«9Siiai»ii«s«^ 



toe At. 



8TAMF 



PATRONIZE HOIV1E INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 

Plione Garfield 7833 E. Benvenuti, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: .25, .30 
and .50 per day. $1.25 per Week and 
up. Special rates for Housekeeping, 

Single or Connecting Rooms. 
This Place Must Be Seen to Be Appre- 
ciated. Nothing Like It In the City. 

1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

205 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

M. WICKS 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

60 STEUART STREET 

San Francisco 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 

DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 5390 

ANCHOR HOUSE 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUEACTURERS 



S. PETERSON, Prop. 

495 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

J. MILLER 
Seamen's Outfitter 
Union Made Goods 

General Merchandise 



Suits Steam-Cleaned $1.50 
Phone -Sutter 767 124 EAST ST. 



133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"EL 




)^ 



Clear Havana Cigars 
of Highest Type 

UNION MADE 

ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Albertsen, Hans 

Christian 
Andersen, E. W. 
Andersen, Gus 
Boers, J. G. 
Bloom, A. A. 
Bernhard, Oscar 
Colbert, M. J. 
Cohn, W. R. 
Ericksen, Earl 
Erickscn, O. E. 
Findlay, J. 
Hans, Nick 
Herno, Fred 
Hallcn, Victor 
Happmer, H. 



Jacona, Carmelo 
Janssan, Axel 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson, Jolm E. 
Kathy, Albert 
Lundquist, Fritz 
Magnussen, Magnus 
Nieman, August 
Olson, John 
Orabrovae 
Petersen, Chas. F. 
Roelfs, J. 
Roelfs, J. 
Rinta, Carl 
Schultz, F. .1. 
Wallen, E. 



Seattle, Wash. 



Abolln, Adam 
Borgen, K. Sigurd 

sen 
Dalil, Ben. 
Fister, Johannes 
Finnlgan, I. H. 
ITagen, Gunder 
Jensen, Gustav 
Johnnsen. Ingvald 
Johnson, Axel 
Nelson. Nels Wll- 

helm 
Larsen, Fred 
Magnuson, P. A. 



Osterlund. Albert 
Olsson, Sigfrid 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phlster, Albert 
Polhome, Mr. 
Ridderstaff. Ernest 
Rye, F. M. J. 
Selback, Chris. 
Slinnlng. Rasmus O 
Spellman Tom 
Starks, John 
Stein, George G. 
Stlxrud, Jack 
Stromsness, Oscar 



News from Abroad. 



The .steamer "Oceanic" of the 
White Star Line, once the greatest 
of ocean greyhound.s, was wrecked 
off the west coast of Scotland. All 
on board were saved. 

.\s a result of the Australian gen- 
eral elections tiie Labor party will 
l)e in power. In the House of Rep- 
resentatives Labor has 41 members. 
Liberals ZZ. and one Independent. 
In the Senate Labor has 7,2 and tlic 
Lilserals 4 members. 

James Gordon Bennett, owner of 
the New York Herald, who makes 
his home in Paris, was married a 
few flays ago to the Baroness de 
Reuter, widow of Baron George de 
Renter, son of the founder of the 
Pcuter Telegraph Company. Mr. 
Ik-nnctt is 73 years old and only a 
few montiis ago his life was de- 
si)aired of. 

.\ccording to Government investi- 
gations foreign tourists to Japan 
during 1913 numbered 21,886, an in- 
crease of 4,922 over 1912. Great 
Britain sent 4,123; the United States, 
5,077; Germany, 1,184; France, 363; 
Russia, 2,755; China, 7,786; Italy, 59; 
Austria-Hungary, 88; Netherlands, 
86; Belgium, 42; Spain, 74; Norway, 
45; Sweden, 50; Switzerland. 30; 
Portugal, 70, and Denmark, 19. 

The French Journal Official pub- 
lishes a ruling of the Minister of 
.Marine which requires every trading 
vessel entering a French port to 
make a declaration tn the military 
.luthorities setting forth the nation- 
ality ()t the vessel and the citizen- 
ship of her passengers and crew. 
This is in order that steps may be 
taken for the transportation of 
aliens. Masters failing to make this 
declaration will not be permitted 
entry and will he regarded as coming 
with hostile intentions. 

Vice Admiral Koichi Fujii, who 
was accused of bribery in connection 
with the Japanese naval corruption 
case, has been sentenced to impris- 
onment for a term of four years and 
six months. .Admiral Fujii was at 
one time Japanese naval attache at 
lierlin. lie was ordered before a 
court martial in February of this 
year. It was charged that he re- 
ceived illicit commissions for influ- 
encing the allotment of admiralty 
contracts in favor of a German firm 
of electrical contractors. 

Protests have been filed against 
Turkey's formal notification to the 
nations of the world that she has 
abrogated the series of conventions, 
treaties and privileges, originating as 
early as the eleventh century, where- 
by foreigners in the Ottoman Em- 
pire have been exempt from local 
jurisdiction in civil and criminal 
cases. l'"or the present foreign sub- 
jects will no longer enjoy what is 
known as extra-territorial rights, 
through which they have been tried 
by their own judges, diploni.ilic rep- 
resentatives <ir consuls. 

Trooi)S Continue to How from 
Canada, .Australia ami India. The 
British Parliament voted UTianimously 
on re(|uest of Premier .\si|uitli to 
add atiollier h.alf million men of all 
ranks to the regular army. This 
brings the total to 1,854,000, an un- 
precedented figure for Great Hritain. 
The regular army will comprise 1,- 
200,000; territorials, 300,000; re- 
serves, 214,000; Indian contingent, 
70,000; Canadian first and second 
contingents, 40,000; Australians, 20,- 
(K)0, and New Zealand, 10,000. This 
contemplates placing 1.200,000 men 
in the field. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"So that infernal tailor has been 
calling again with my bill. Did you 
tell him I was out?" 

"Yes, sir, and I told him I thought 
he was, too." 



Paying Teller— You must get some 
one to identify you before I can pay 
this check. Have you any friends in 
this town? 

Stranger— Not one. I'm the dog- 
catcher. 



"Do you believe, sir, that on elec- 
tion day the women should be at the 
polls?" 

"Yes, sir," the crusty bachelor un- 
expectedly replied — "at both of 'em — 
north and south." 



"Is there anything, mother, a 
woman may do, which a man can't 
do?" 

"There are two, my child: No one 
but a woman can look at a woman 
without seeing her, and no one but a 
woman can see a woman without 
looking at her." 



A "funny man" thought he would 
break up a sufTrage meeting, so from 
the audience, he called out to the 
woman speaker: 

"Say, madam, would you like to 
be a man?" 

Back instantly came the reply: 
"Yes, I would; would you?" 



The justice had fined the auto 
owner $7 for speeding. 

The victim pulled out a ten dollar 
bill. 

The justice stared at it. 

"It's th' smallest you've got?" 

"Yes." 

".^in't I a chump!" muttered the 
justice. 



Arthur was passing a day with his 
aunt. 

"I am going to do something to 
please yoii on your birthday," she 
said to the little boy, "but first I 
want to ask the teacher how you be- 
have at school." 

"If you really want to do some- 
thing to please me, auntie," said the 
boy, "don't ask the teacher." 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 IVIARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OI..D AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
.ind teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent II. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN &t CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING CO. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



jKTtllNimDNAL ■ LIVIOIV 

UNion, 







Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 








ONE BIG STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, WatchmaKers, Opticians 

No purchase too small to be appreciated. To prove this, we sell: 

ALARM CLOCKS, 45c UP WATCHES, $1.00 UP 

EYE GLASSES, 50c UP 



Begin Saving Your 

CHRISTMAS MONEY 
NOW 

Here's a $1 Savings Bank for 50c 
That WiU Help You 

Every one wants money for Clirist- 
nias — and three months are little 
enough time for saving it. Begin 
now. 

There is surely some friend or loved 
one yi)U wish to present with a token 
of your friendship on Christmas morn; 
or possibly you wish to buy for your- 
self some lon(? desired object. 
Here is the easiest way: 

Secure one of 
those One Dollar 
Banks that we 
sell for 50c. Tlien 
practice a little 
;^.lf -il.-nial by 
■ 1 ro ppl ng your 
• xtra change into 
the Bank. We 
venture to say 
you will have 
more than enougii 
to buy the desired present. 

You keep the Bank — we keep the 
key. There is no temptation to open 
it at home. Bring it to the Store 
wlion you want to open it — do what 
you like with the money. 

On sale at Transfer Desk — Main Floor 





Market at Fifth 



V^^'VWWW^WN^^WW^^'WVN/VSi'N^^^Ni^Ni^'VSf'VN^W 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
72 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMIEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Opp. S. p. Depot at Third & Townsend 

Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



CJBfrBusrtu 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 






S2^1^^.N s-^.^^.^s:yp::^:^::?: 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVIII, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1914. 



Whole No. 2299. 



GAGING TRADE UNION PROGRESS. 



An Analysis of "Revolutionary Reformers" Theories— By Wm. Z. Foster. 



Of all the contradictions in which I. W. W. 
thinkers labor, perhaps the most glaring is their 
two-faced attitude towards the so-called "law of 
economic determinism." They claim, on the one 
hand, that economic conditions are the driving 
forces that shape all social institutions. With 
much "scientific" ado they demonstrate that the 
I. W. W. is the inevitable result of these forces 
and in full harmony with their dictates. But, on 
the other hand, they won't extend their law of 
"scientific" Socialism to the trade unions. These 
organizations, for some mysterious reason, are 
exempt from its influences. They are altogether 
out of harmony with modern conditions. As 
Vincent St. John, general secretary-treasurer of 
the I. W. W., says, they learn nothing from their 
defeats. The I. W. W. thinkers take the very 
"scientific" position that the trade unions are 
gigantic conspiracies against the working class, 
founded and engineered by Gompers, Hanna, 
Carnegie, Belmont, et al. For policy's sake, they 
conveniently ignore the fact that although the 
many affiliated and unaffiliated national and local 
trade unions have the necessary autonomy to 
freely develop in response to the dictates of 
their economic environment they are neverthe- 
less, roughly speaking, all on the same plane 
of development. One is tempted to hazard the 
wild theory that this common status prevails be- 
cause economic conditions and the worker's 
mind are in a corresponding state of develop- 
ment. But no, that would not be "scientific." 
To be "scientific" one must always bear in 
mind the fundamental principle that the I. W. 
W. is the only labor organization justified by 
modern conditions. For some unexplained rea- 
son it alone is influenced by "economic deter- 
minism." 

Consequent on the above contradiction the 
bulk of the I. W. W. flatly deny that the trade 
unions are making any progress. But there is a 
newer element. 

As an illustration of this autonomy — since its 
inception, the International Shingle Weavers' 
Union, now the International Union of Timber 
Workers, has not received even one suggestion 
from the A. F. of L. as to how it should be 
run. 

They can't altogether blink this evident prog- 
ress. But laboring under the same contradiction 
as their fellows they proceed to explain it by 
still more and wonderful intellectual flights. 
According to them this progress is due to the 
activities of the I. W. W. Thus the I. W. W. 
stands as a sort of connecting link between the 
trade unions and "economic determinism." The 
trade unions learn nothing from their own ex- 
perience directly. All wisdom must filter 
through the I. W. W. to them. To the novice 
this may seem a marvelous theory, but to any 
one familiar with I. W. W. dogmas there is 
nothing extraordinary about it. 

For the benefit of those who deny al! trade 
union progress we will briefly cite a few of their 
more important advances. Then we will respond 
to those who believe that the I. W. W. is the 
source of all progress. 

In the A. F. of L. proper, far reaching 



changes are taking place. One of these is the 
growing sentiment in the conventions for indus- 
trial unionism. All indications point that the A. 
F. of L. will soon be dominated by it. The foun- 
dation of the various departments was a big step 
in advance. The departments serve to break 
down the old craft spirit of the unions, and are 
tile beginnings of industrial unionism. The 
growth of the A. F. of L. also shows progress. 
It is a significant fact that the "perfect," 
"modern," "ideal" I. W. W. has decreased in 
membership from 40,000 (1905), to 7,000 (1914), 
while the "decrepit," "antiquated," "dying" A. 
F. of L. has increased in membership from 
1,.S00,000 to 2,200,000 in the same period. 

The individual unions also show innumerable 
signs of progress. In the mining industry the 
U. M. W. of A. is growing like a weed. It is 
daily becoming more militant. At its last con- 
vention it declared in favor of meeting a declara- 
tion of war with a general strike. The affiliation 
of the W. F. of M. has been secured. A plan 
is on foot to amalgamate the two miners' unions. 
In the building trades everywhere the unions are 
developing more solidarity and power. The 
building trades councils are being extended and 
strengthened. The two factions of carpenters 
have been combined and the wood workers 
amalgamated with them. The steamfitters and 
plumbers have joined forces. The two factions 
of electrical workers are being brought together. 
The stone cutters and the bricklayers have 
formed an "offensive and defensive" alliance. A 
big move is on foot to combine the three unions 
of stone workers. It is also proposed to join 
the plasterers and bricklayers to this combina- 
tion, etc. 

In the garment trades the tailors have ex- 
panded into an industrial union, and are working 
to amalgamate the three garment worker unions. 

In the printing trades, as in all others, the 
principle of having all agreements expire at the 
same time is being ever more widely adopted. 
Strong efforts are being made to bring all the 
I)rinting trade unions into one union. 

Among the railroad unions the signs of prog- 
ress are innumerable. First in importance is the 
wide expansion of the epoch making federations 
of shop organizations. These federations are 
performing wonders in breaking down the old 
craft spirit that has held the American move- 
ment back so much. At their last convention 
a strong effort was made to amalgamate them 
all into one union. Among the operating em- 
ployes the spirit of federation and solidarity is 
also spreading rapidly. Of this growing soli- 
darity the brilliant strikes on the D. & H. and the 
S. P. are examples. The engineers and firemen, 
for years the bitterest enemies, have decided to 
henceforth make joint agreements and to fight 
as one union. The brakemen and conductors 
have done likewise. .System federations among 
the Brotherhoods are becoming common. A 
national federation of all the Brotherhoods is 
now inevitable. Later on the shop men will 
doubtless be included. 

In the metal trades it has been decided that 
hereafter all contracts shall expire at the same 



time. Various of the unions are widening out 
to take in the unskilled. The recent convention 
of the officers of the machinists endorsed amal- 
gamation of all the metal trades unions into one 
union. This is now before the rank and file on 
a referendum. The machinists and electricians 
are now making joint agreements, etc. 

And so it goes on in practically all the unions. 
The Shingle Weavers have extended their juris- 
diction to take in all the workers in the lumber 
industry. The Cigar Makers are voting on a 
proposition to include in their union all the 
workers engaged in the making of cigars. The 
Longshoremen's and Water Front unions are 
federating and amalgamating. The women bar- 
bers are being organized and as never before 
attempts are being made to organize the un- 
skilled. 

The central labor councils are also waking 
up. They are beginning to demand the autonomy 
necessary to their growth and development. 
This was seen in the Electrical Workers' dis- 
pute. They are also furthering the labor move- 
ment — a method of organization which is per- 
haps the best yet devised in the world's labor 
movement. 

Numerous unions are adopting revolutionary 
preambles and repudiating the doctrine of the 
identity of interest. The contract has lost much 
of the sacredness that used to be attached to it. 
In a thousand ways the trade unions are re- 
flecting the growing intelligence of the working 
class. Only those who are stone blind with 
prejudice fail to perceive this. It is indeed a 
hardy "thinker" who can at this late date say 
with Vincent St. John that "There is no case 
in the history of bygone organizations in the 
labor movement where existing organizations 
have changed to meet new conditions." But 
then the I. W. W. is noted in denying all facts 
that do not agree with its theories and dogmas. 

Now for those other wonderful thinkers who 
consider the trade union progress they can no 
longer ignore to be due to the activities of the 
I. W. W. — those who consider the I. W. W. 
to be a sort of intermediary between economic 
conditions and common sense, on the one hand, 
and the trade unions on the other. These de- 
clare tliat it is only when the trade unions feel 
themselves threatened by the I. W. W. that they 
become progressive. According to their logic 
those unions that have been fought the most by 
the I. W. W. should be the most progressive. 
But tliis is not the case. The Barbers, Textile, 
Boot and Shoe, Hotel and Rubber Workers 
have been especially combated by the I. W. W., 
and none of them are showing any great prog- 
ress. On the contrary their wars with the 
I. W. W. furnished them with an incentive, nay 
even compelled them to adopt, in self-defense, 
the reactionary tactics the I. W. W. condemns, 
viz.. to remain at work while a sister union 
strikes. It may be laid down as a labor union 
axiom that where dual unionism exists "or- 
p,anized scabhery" becomes inevitable. The wars 
between the A. F. of L. and the K. of L.. the 
Brotherhoods and the A. R. U. and the U. B. 
R. E., the two Shoe Workers' unions, the two 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Carpenters' unions, the two factions of Elec- 
trical Workers, the Steamfitters and Plumbers, 
etc., amply prove this. However well inten- 
tioned, dual unionism does not prevent, but pro- 
motes reaction. 

The bulk of the progressive unions are in the 
building trades, metal trades, mining, railroad, 
and garment making industries. In all these in- 
dustries tile 1. W. W. has been a negligible 
factor. It has never threatened the existing 
trade unions. But this difficulty is easily gotten 
around by 1. \V. VV. thinkers. They assert that 
the progress of these unions is due to the prop- 
aganda of the I. W. W., but examination shows 
this argument to be fallacious also for the very 
good reason that the trade unions are not de- 
veloping along lines advocated by the I. VV. W. 
The development of the trade unions has been 
along the lines of joint agreements, federations, 
amalgamations, all contracts expiring at the 
same time, labor forward movements, autonomy 
of central labor councils, etc. Has the I. W. 
\V. ever advocated any of these measures? Most 
decidedly not. It has been a bitter enemy to 
them. They have ridiculed system federations, 
amalgamations and joint agreements as the most 
reactionary makeshifts. As for the contract, 
they have consistently advocated its complete 
abolition. They have never advocated that the 
various unions all have their contracts expire at 
the same time. As for the labor forward 
movement, most of them have no conception of 
what it is. Likewise with the central labor 
councils, they haven't yet discovered their ex- 
istence. The I. W. W. program has consisted 
simply of a blanket industrial unionism for all 
industries alike. The movements now agitating 
the trade unions are products of their daily 
experience. The dogmas born in the brain of 
DeLeon and propagated by the I. W. W. have 
had small influence upon them. This is proven 
by the fact that the peculiarly I. W. W. ideas 
regarding low dues, no strike funds, short 
strikes, no sick nor death benefits, unrestricted 
immigration, low salaries for officials, intermit- 
tent strikes, etc., are finding very slight echo in 
the trade union movement. 

Except in rare instances it can't be shown that 
the I. W. W. has helped the labor movement. 
On the contrary, with its constant campaign 
of knocking and preaching of raw and impossi- 
ble idealism, it has been a decided hindrance to 
it. Hun(lrc<ls, yes, thousands of the best and 
most effective militants this country has ever 
l)roduced have been discouraged with the slow 
progress of the trade unions, which keeps pace 
with the development of the working class. 
They have been led to either quit them or to 
become indifferent to their fate. The loss to 
the unions in this way has been immense. 

The I. W. W., with its Utopian program of 
creating a perfect union out of an imperfect 
working class is a sort of labor union measles 
that the labor movements of the Anglo-Saxon 
countries seem destined to experience. Only 
when this childish disease is lived through; only 
when the rebels quit measuring exerything w-ith 
their Socialist "science" and begin to more 
closely study the problem in hand and settle 
down to constructive work, will the American 
movement take a spurt forward like the English 
movement has since it has recovered from its 
attack of I. W. W.'isrn three years ago. 

For those who believe the I. W. W. to be at 
once the sum total and the source of all labor 
union progress perhaps the following fable may 
bear a lesson: 

Once a gnat alighted upon a chariot standing 
still in a Roman arena. Soon the chariot got 
under way and as it traveled around the arena it 
raised a great cloud of dust. "Goodness me;" 
cried the "scientific" gnat, "what a tremendous 
dust I am raising." 



It appears from a recent return that 306 
sailing vessels were em])loyc(l in the nitrate 
trade from the West Coast in 1913, tlie 
various nationalities being represented as fol- 
lows: French, 103: German, 78: Norwegian, 
53; British, 42: Italian 16: Russian. 12: 
Danish, 1 ; and Belgian 1. Tliese 306 vessels 
ranged from 13 to 37 years of age. and 
carried 970.000 tons of nitrate, of which five 
vessels were totally lost carrying 15,400 tons. 
The total value of the nitrate carried is put 
at £9,400,000, and the average premium 
3-)4 per cent, net to underwriters, or, sa\-. 
£258,500. The value of the nitrate totally 
lost was £148.000. which left £110,500 to 
meet all craft losses and general and par- 
ticular average claims. It is added that 
the figure of 15.400 tons for total losses was 
abnormal, and that the average for the past 
seven years works out at 10.400 tons per 
annum. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



EDITOR PERSON ACQUITTED. 

Despite the i)itter persecution conducted 
l)y States Attorney W illiams of De Witt 
County. States Attorney Everett Smith of 
l.ogan County, and special pro.secuting .At- 
torney Judge Lot H,errick, whom rumor 
has it is a special repre.sentative of the 
Illinois Central Railroad, retained to aid 
in silencing Editor t'er.son by sending him 
to tlie gallows, yes, despite all of this 
armed array of "legal" talent, Carl Person, 
the persecuted one, was accpiitted. 

.\ll of our readers are ac(|uainted with 
the history of this case and to them it is 
unnecessary to make any statement. But 
lo the few who may not be actpiainted 
with the facts, in brief it wnv be stated 
that Antone Musser, former chief of police 
of Clinton. III., a bitter union hater, as- 
saulted Carl Person, knocked him down, 
and stamped, kicked and was beating him 
to death when Person, after warning him, 
shot him down. 

When it is borne in mind that Musser, 
the thug, was a burly brute weighing over 
two hundred pounds, and Person a man of 
one hundred twenty-five pounds, the great 
disparity, and iuiec|iial contest can be seen 
at a glance. 

Comerford si)rang a sensation at the out- 
set of the trial by getting to the jury the 
fact that States .Attorney \\' illiams con- 
spired to railroad the defendant, by writing 
an article shortly before the trial under 
the name of S. Dean Wasan. The article 
was printed in the Lincoln papers and was 
so i)rejudiced against the defendant's cause 
that dozens of the jurors asked to be ex- 
cused because they coiUd not .give the 
defendant a fair trial after reading it. 

The camp of the prosecution was sup- 
l>orted by an army of Illinois Central spies, 
and private detectives. Excitement ran 
high. 

In the States .Attorney's opening state- 
ment he charged Person with being a cold- 
blooded murderer and demanded that he l)e 
dealt with according to law. 

The prosecutor dropped the mask when 
in the j^assion of his opening address to 
the jury, he assailed the editor of the 
strike Bulletin for his attack on the Illinois 
Central and its employes. He said that he 
woidd show that Person was of a malicious 
heart because he wrote up the men who 
look the bread out of the mouths of the 
strikers as "scabs." 

Attorney Comerford. in his opening ad- 
dress, accepted a challenge and demanded 
a reascm for the man-hunt be given to the 
jiu'y. He charged the existence of a con- 
spiracy of organized dollars to make a 
gallows-sacrifice of Person. Over a hun- 
dred witnesses were subpoenaed. 

I'ut on Monday. Oct. 5. Carl Person was 
ac(iuitted. the jury composed of represent- 
ative men. who could not be influenced 
by the biasefl prosectitor, firmly brought 
in a verdict of not guilty, and thus repri- 
manded the guilty county and State offi- 
cials who woidd have convicted an inno- 
cent man at the behest of a labor-crushing 
corporation. 



Africa is in third place in the amount of 
cotton goods consumed. In some sections 
of Africa 50 per cent, of the unbleached 
cotton trade is with the United States and 
only 10 per cent, w-ith England. 



TAFT VERSUS GOMPERS. 



l-'.ditor C'oAsr Ska.mkn's {(ji'kn.m.: 

■A recent issue of yt)ur valuable paper con- 
tained an article, signed by Chas. .M. A!- 
l)recht, criticizing Sainuel Gompers for cer- 
tain alleged prai.se of his i)olicy by William 
Howard Taft. in a recent issue of the 
■■.\merican Federationist." as follows: 

"I congratulate you on the hard fight that 
you have made, and up to this time the suc- 
cessful fight you have made against the 
s])read of Socialism among.st wage earns 
I'nder |)resent conditions of human nat 
the Socialist state is an imi)ossible one v.l 
out a tryanuy, in contrast with which ^," 
hardship or injustice of the present ifuAis- 
t'-ia! system will seem trivial." (}' 

-As stated, the foregoing is from an article 
contribtUcd to the September is.sue of the 
".Anurican I'"ederationist," by ex-President 
William Howard Taft, along with other mes- 
sages from ex-President Roosevelt and Presi- 
dent Wil.son. The presumed congratulations 
of Taft to Gonmers seems to have brought 
vials of wratli down ui)on the latter froiu 
Socialist:.- sources and the article referred to 
which api^eared in your paper is one of the 
many efforts of the self-styled radicals to dis- 
crcflil and belittle the grand old man of the 
.American Labor movement. It is rather .sur- 
prising that a paper like the Co.\st Seamen's 
JofK.N.M.. which has always been conducted 
along sane lines, and imder the responsible 
editorship, can afford space for the wretched 
howls and dismal vaporings of the grand 
army of destructionists and knockers. 

Ihe attempt to ])ut Sanuiel (iompcrs in the 
>;ime category as William Howard Taft be- 
cause he has the misfortune to receive con- 
gratulatory mes.sages from the latter is ridicu- 
lous, (iompers has devoted a life of energetic 
and able effort in behalf of the men who toil : 
while Taft is well known as a reactionary of 
the first order. I-'or further light upon the 
matter of the Taft congratulations I respect- 
fidly call attention to the Taft-Gompers cor- 
rcs])ondence appearing in the October number 
of the ".American Federationi.st." 

Trusting that you will find space for these 
few lines, I remain. Respectfully, 

M.\RI N E E NGI N EER. 



Tile seamen of the Ilamburg-.American 
and .\orth German Lloyd steamship lines, 
whose vessels in New York were tied uj) 
at the beginning of the war, held a meet- 
ing recently at Imperial Hall, Hoboken, 
imder the auspices of the seamen's sec- 
tion of the German Transport Workers' 
Union, to hear a report of a committee 
which conferred with the authorized rep- 
resentatives of the two lines. At the time 
the vessels were tied up the seamen were 
not discharged, as they had signed at the 
home ports for the round trip, and the 
committee at the conference refused to en- 
tertain the proposition to accept reduced 
rates of wages during the tie-up and de- 
manded that full wages be paid for the 
time they are detained in this port. The 
conuuittee reported that the demand for 
full wages had finally been granted by the 
two companies. One-half of the wages, it 
was agreed, is to be paid to the seamen 
here and the other hall to their relatives 
in Europe. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Science Blighted by War. 

The Medical Record ex]jresses the cipin- 
ion that a long-drawn-out struggle in Eu- 
rope will retard the progress of medical 
science abroad for many years. 

"It may be premature," says the editor, 

^o attempt to prophesy the ultimate effects 

r Vie insane struggle in luirojie upon the 

■ess of medical science, but there can 

i)> • I ) doubt that in Europe, where the 



i)> • I ) doubt that i 
tort. . of science has 



tort, '.'of science has been carried high, the 
ecom nic losses resulting from a long-con- 
tinued war would dim its radiance for 
many years to come. Attainment in science 
and in the liberal arts is favored by unre- 
stricted leisure and freedom from the 
stresses and cares of daily life, and the 
dissipation of a country's resources cannot 
but react unfavorably in halting the on- 
ward march (jf science. 

"In addition to the diminishing endow- 
ments for research which will ])resumably 
follow the war, there is aucjthcr imi)ortant 
tactor that will hami)er medical investiga- 
tion. The mobilization of the large Juiro- 
l^ean armies must drain the laboratories 
and the clinics of their brilliant young 
workers, who, as reservists, \'olunteers, t^r 
members of the Red Cross, will be added 
to the medical corps of the respective 
armies. ( )n the other hand these men, or 
such of them as survive, will return with an 
e.\i)erience which may i)erhaps more than 
comjjensate for the interru])tion in the or- 
derly ])rosecution of research ; but even re- 
search is not altogether paralyzed bv war." 



Cigarmakers and Stogiemakers Agree. 

The Seattle Convention of the .\merican 
Federation of Labor instructed the Execu- 
ti\e Council to continue efforts to bring- 
about the amalgamation of the National 
Stogie Makers" League and the Cigar 
Makers' International Union. In compli- 
ance therewith, a conference was called by 
vSamuel Gom])ers, President of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, of the representa- 
tives of the two- organizations primarily in 
interest, to be held at Cleveland, O., Sep- 
tember 18, 1914. The participants in the 
conference were (i. W. Perkins, Thomas F. 
Tra(;y, and W'm. Strauss, representing the 
Cigar -Makers' International L'nion of 
.America: W. II. Riley, Charles Huggins, 
and F. W. Sonderman, representing the 
National Stogie Makers' League, and Sam- 
uel C,om])ers, rei:)resenting the .\merican 
i'"cderation of Labor. 

.After a thorough discussion of terms and 
conditions of the amalgamation by which 
the National Stogie Makers' League would 
become amalgamated with the Cigar Ma- 
kers' International Lnion. the following 
declaration and terms and conditions of 
amalgamation have been agreed to: 

The necessity is recognized for the thor- 
ough organization of all persons enii)loyed 
in the cigar and stogie industry, so that 
the best interests of all the workers therein 
may be the better ])rotecte(l and promoted. 

That all stogiemakers who are in good 
standing in the Stogie Makers' League 
shall be admitted into the Cigar Makers' 
International Union of .America and placed 
in full fellowship therein without the ]iay- 



ment of an initiation fee, provided the local 
union of which they are members shall 
|)lace its funds in the general funds of the 
International Union. 

( I'or the information of all parties in in- 
terest and who may be unacciuainted with 
the fact, it is here stated as a fact that the 
general funds of the International Union 
are held 1)\' the local unions in trust for 
the general purposes and benefits of the 
members of the International Union, and 
are not forwarded to the International 
headquarters.) 

If. the funds of the vStogie Makers' 
League amoiuit to five dollars ($5.00) per 
capita, the members shall be immediately 
entitled to strike benefit and to $50.00 
death benefit. If the funds of the Stogie 
Makers' League shall amount to $10.00 per 
ca])ita, they shall be immediately entitled, 
in addition to the foregoing, to a sick bene- 
fit, as provided in the laws of the Interna- 
tional Lnion. It is agreed that the mem- 
bers shall be entitled to all of the Jjenefits 
as scon as they have been members of the 
International Lnion the length of time pro- 
vided in the laws thereof. That an organ- 
izer shall be appointed for a term of at 
least two years, in the elTort to organize 
stogiemakers. Not less than half of the 
organizer's time shall be devoted to this 
herein declared jjurpose. The organizer 
shall be familiar with the stogiemaking 
l)rancli of the industry, and. all other things 
being etpial. the preference shall be for a 
stogieniaker to act as such organizer. 

That stogies, cheroots, tobies, or cigars, 
or anything coming within the jurisdiction 
of the Cigar Makers' International L'^nion 
shall be defined as follows : 

First — All cigars shall be known as such 
wdien made of long fillers, or scraps, (jr 
both, with or without a binder and a paste 
head, whether pasted down around and 
smooth, twisted on or cut oH. 

Second — .\ stogie shall be defined and 
known as follows: When made with curl 
or twist head, in which no paste is used in 
sha])ing or fastening the head, and wdiich 
is generally known as a stogie. 

That the President of the C. M. I. U. of 
.A. shall ha\'e made and printed a lal)el for 
stogies as follows: 

"Issued by Cigar Makers' International 

Union of America, , President. 

The Stogies contained in this package are 
the product of Union .Stogiemakers, mem- 
bers of the C. AI. I. U. of A." 

In no case shall the Stogie Union Labels 
be issued or allowed to 1)e used on stogies 
made for less than $3.50 ])er thousand. 

Tliat the whole question and ])lan of 
amalgamation be ])ublished in four consec- 
utive issues of the Cigar Makers' ofificial 
journal and one copy of each issue be fur- 
nished to each member of the Stogie Ma- 
kers' League: these issues of the journal 
to be also open for letters and articles, on 
the subject of amalgamation, to the mem- 
bers of the Stogie Makers' League. 

In all respects, other than in this agree- 
ment provided, the laws of the International 
Lnion shall govern all local unions and 
members, regardless of the branch of the 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union nf America. 5/0 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime BIdg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus. 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
titne Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards. Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs.. 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. En.gel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General .a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbnndet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova. Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transpo -t, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Repostcros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marincros, Calle ingia- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

I-'cdcration Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

,'\ss(iciaca() de Marinhciros e Reniandore.s, Rua 
Barai) de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Doniingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictines 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

.'vrnalgainatcd Society of South .^fricaIl Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The committee representing the 
New South Wales unions organized 
on an industrial basis has decided 
that wages boards or courts with a 
purely craft basis are a reactionary 
step, which should be resisted by the 
industrial unions. 

According to returns supplied to 
the Danish Satistical Office, 5.1 per 
cent, of the 114,400 members of trade 
unions reporting were unemployed at 
the end of April, as compared with 
8.8 per cent, at the end of the pre- 
ceding month, and 4.5 per cent, in 
April, 1913. The average number of 
days lost through unemployment in 
April was 1.3 per member, as com- 
pared with 2.0 in the previous month 
and 0.9 in April, 1913. 

The number of paupers relieved 
on one day in June, 1914, in the 35 
urban districts of the United King- 
dom corresponded to a rate of 186 
per 10,000. Compared with May, 1914, 
the total number of paupers relieved 
decreased by 1,005 (or 0.3 per cent.), 
while the rate per 10,000 remained 
unchanged. The number of indoor 
paupers decreased by 2,538 (or 1.5 
per cent.) and the number of out- 
door paupers increased by 1,533 (or 
0.9 per cent.). There were increases 
in 14 districts, the greatest being 
in the Leicester district (11 per 10,- 
000); in 16 districts there were de- 
creases, the greatest being in the 
Cork, Waterford, and Limerick dis- 
trict (12 per 10,000). All the London 
districts showed small decreases. The 
remaining 5 districts showed no 
change. 

All emigrants landing in Canada 
between March 1 and October 31 
must possess $25 and children $12.50 
each, and between November 1 and 
the last day of February $50, and 
$25 respectively, and sufficient travel- 
ing money, except that the following 
need have sufficient traveling money 
only: (1) Farm laborers and female 
servants, if going to assured em- 
ployment as such; (2) certain rela- 
tives of residents in Canada. Em- 
ployment has somewhat improved in 
several places; but there are still 
considerable numbers, both of skilled 
and unskilled laborers, out of work, 
and several factories are running 
short time. According to the British 
Labor Gazette the above restrictive 
regulations, therefore, are being rigid- 
ly enforced, and no mechanic or la- 
borer should go to Canada now, 
unless he goes to assured work. 

The total number of cases of 
poisoning and of anthrax reported to 
the British Home Office under the 
Factory and Workshop Act during 
June, 1914, was 40, of which 37 were 
due to lead poisoning, 1 to arsenic 
poisoning, and 2 to anthrax; none 
of these cases was fatal. In addi- 
tion, 32 cases of lead poisoning (6 
of which were fatal) were reported 
among house painters and plumbers. 
During the six months ended June, 
1914, the total number of cases of 
poisoning and of anthrax reported 
under the Factory and Workshop Act 
was 298, as compared with 330 dur- 
ing the coresponding period of 1913. 
The number of deaths in 1914 was 
20, as compared with 16 in 1913. In 
addition, there were 110 cases of lead 
poisoning (including 18 deaths) 
among house painters and plumbers 
in the first six months of 1914, as 
compared with 135 cases (including 
21 deaths) in the corresponding pe- 
riod of 1913. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BROWN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

■437 PROINT 8XRBET SAIN PEOKO 



CLOTHES SATISFACTION 

IS THE RESULT WHEN YOU CONSULT 

S. G. SWANSON 

For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postofflce 

Established 1904 at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Andersen, A. -1645 Kremer, Sigurd 
-Andersen, Rasmus Kalnamm, Andvey 
.\ndersen, Martin Kolodzie, George 
Anderson, Axel Kristlansen, Nils 

Andersson, E. -1762 Karstin, Hugo 
Anderson, H. -1883 Leldeker, K. 
A., Mr. -1504 Lang, Chas. 

Andersen, Edward Lindner, J. -1750 
.\nderson. Gust Lundberg, T. 

Alin, Emil Lyngard. Jorgen 

Anderson, David C. Mesak, E. 
Bensen, Severin Mikalsen. Andreas 



Berndt, Hugo 



Martinelli, Walter 



Bringsrud, Marald Mennlcke, Fritz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Kupfer, born February 9, 
1890, at Coburg, Germany, is in- 
quired for by the German Consulate, 
201 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johannes Puun, born in Oesel, 
Arensburg, Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 84 Embarcadero, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

$10.00 reward will be paid by 
Johnson & Higgins, 244 California 
street, for information locating John 
Anderson and George T. Nelson, 
who were members of the crew of 
the steamship "Asuncion" in Octo- 
ber, 1908. 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister. Miss Lucy Wood, 108 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
.Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Anybody knowing the where- 
abouts of Arne Johnsen please 
notify O. M. Johnsen, Mosby, 
Christiand S., Norway. 

Richard Ryan, who left the British 
steamship "Candida" at San Francisco 
in July last, is inquired for by the 
British Consul-General. 

Fritjof Ellingsen, age 32, a native 
of Drammen, Norway, he was short, 
heavy set, dark hair, parted in the 
center, and good looking. Anybody 
knowing his whereabouts please noti- 
fy Ed Knach, 171 Clipper street, city. 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



A SAILOR'S BANK 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-FARING MEN 

— in the — 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service'' and courteous treatment to al! its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In lyiO it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. hank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



Berg, S. 
Brogard, N. 
Bergqvist, Wm. 
Boy, A. 
Cirul, M. 
Christensen, A. 

-1095 
Cotter. .T. 
Carlson, Kalle 
Ceelan. John 
Clausen, .T. 
Chilton, Harry 
Caddel, Adolf 
Carlson, Carl 
Dreger, Jack 
Essen. Carl 
ElUngson. Ivar 
Fasholz. nan 
Folvik, Lewis 
Grigoleit, E, 
Gunther, Dick 
Gustafson, Alf 
Gusek, B. 
Gronlund, Oskar 
Holmborg, Frank 
Hansen, Marius 
Holm. Arthur 



Miller, Wm. 
Mayers, P. M. 
Michaelsen, A. -1105 
Morris, M. H. 
MaUson, J. -1320 
Makinan, K. 
Nilson, Edon. C. 
Olsen, A. O. -759 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Ole Wilh 
Osterberg, S. B 
-1284 1. 

Olsen, O. Mart' 
Paader, Hugo ^ 
Paulson. Gustf," ' 
Perez, Antonia 
Plant. Blllle ' 
Peterson, C. E. -903 
Rutel, Ernest 
Robbins. Jack 
Sandstrom. Ivar 
Svensen, Nick 
Svendsen, S. -1717 
Steen, J. C. 
Sandy, Oskar 
Samuelsen, Victor 
Schultz, Albert 



Hansen, H. T. -1446Schultz, Axel 
Hansen. Johannes Sanseter, Paul 
Hakonsen. P. O. 
Haro, Aarp 
Harrold. Henry 
Hermanson. Fritz 



Schmidt, George 
Schager, E. 
Svenningsen, S. N. 
Schultz, Robert 



.lohan.sen, Ed. -2240 Tell. Olaf 



.Tohansen. Emil 
Johansson, N. A. 

-280 
Jensen, Osrar M. 
Johnson, John A. 
Jorgensen. H. P. 
■Tohnsen, George 
Karlson. Richard 



Tvedt. Olaf 
Thomas, Joseph W. 
Vohs, Heinrich 
Wagner, Billy 
Zlmmer, Walter 

Packages. 
Johansen, Nils A. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, Anton 
Anderson. O. 
Anderson, Edvard 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Gusz, Henry 
Hansen, Eugen 
Hansen. Jens 
Jorgensen, C. M. 



Johanson, John -880 
Kosklnen, Suttro 
More, Walter 
Silver, Salln E. 
Ivertsen, Sigvald B. 
Sperkman, Mae 
Tomkin, Frank 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 
which is entirely different from the 
mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

We Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAU. 

San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealer In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



ALEX. KANE 



C. A. BRUCE 



GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 



CIGARS, TOBACCO, SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Bellenot, who last sailed on 
the S. S. "Mariposa" out of Seattle, 
Wash., about November, 1912, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Mrs. Bel- 
lenot, 1406 Second street, West 
Berkeley, Cal. Anyone knowing of 
him kindly write at the above ad- 
dress. — 6-24-14. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the 
mother, Fru Thorin, Hegagata 7, 
Goteborg, Sweden. 9-23-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Tlie Canadian Marine Court has exonerated 
Captain P. J. Hickey of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway liner "Princess Victoria" of blame in the 
collision recently with the "Admiral Sampson/' 
when eleven lives were lost. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway announce that 

as their transpacific steamers have all been 

taken over by the British Admiralty in the 

'lit, unless they can charter suitable steamers 

service to the Orient is entirely suspended 

jc time being. 

, Benson and Hammond logging companies 
havil^ announced that no more log rafts will be 
sent from the Columbia to California this sea- 
son. Each company has a raft ready to go, but 
both will be held until next sinnmer. The Ben- 
son Company has sent three and the Hammond 
Company two rafts south this season. 

Word was received from Commissioner of 
Navigation Chamberlain at Washington by Col- 
lector of the Port Davis that American registry 
had been formally granted to the former Kos- 
nios steamship "Alexandria," now the "Sacra- 
mento," of the Northern and Southern Steam- 
ship Company, and that her ofiicial certificate 
number would be 212,688, 

Tt is admitted by the Great Northern people 
that "English interests" are negotiating for the 
big liner "Minnesota," but whether these inter- 
ests are the Canadian Pacific, the Grand Trunk 
Pacific (which is thought to have ambitions in 
the direction of establishing a transpacific line 
from Prince Arthur) or agents of the British 
Admiralty is not known. The "Minnesota" 
would make an excellent troop ship. 

According to reports, extensive improvements 
are to be made on the Miner fill (San Pedro) 
at the instigation of Andrew Weir, the London 
shipowner, who is now on his way to the Pacific 
Coast. The property consists of 157 acres of 
land reclaimed by the Outer Harbor Dock and 
Wharf Company, which is now owned by the 
Union Oil Company. Over a mile of wharves 
have already been built and new warehouses and 
tracks are to be built. A system of electric con- 
veyors and trucks has been installed. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway Company, owner 
of the steamer "Princess Victoria," has filed 
counter charges, of neglect of maritime regula- 
tions on the part of the officers of the steamer 
"Admiral Sampson" and made denial of re- 
sponsibility or blame of the "Princess Vic- 
toria" for the collision in which the "Admiral 
Sampson" was sunk. The petition constitutes 
the company's answer to the $670,000 libel suit 
filed by the Pacific Alaska Navigation Com- 
pany, owner of the lost vessel. The Court is 
asked to limit the liability of the company for 
damages to the extent of the company's interest 
in the "Princess Victoria," and blame for the 
collision is shifted entirely to the officers of the 
"Admiral Sampson," 

Damages in the sum of $31,000 have been 
awarded to the Puget Sound Tugboat Com- 
pany by the Federal Court at Seattle, against 
the Coast Shipping Company, of San Francisco, 
for the sinking of the tug "Sea Lion" by the 
schooner "Oceania Vance." The "Sea Lion" 
was sunk ofif the Strait of San Juan de Fuca 
June 19, 1909, "Oceania Vance" rammed the 
"Sea Lion" in a dense fog, sinking her in 72 
fathoms of water. No lives were lost. In a 
written opinion Judge Neterer stated the evi- 
dence indicated the "Oceanic Vance" was sailing 
before the wind, with most of her canvas spread, 
and that she was making nearly seven knots, 
although in a dense fog. She was proceeding 
through a fog at a dangerous rate of speed and 
showed carelessness, the opinion holds. 

Confirmation of the published report that at 
the time of the bombardment of Papeete (Ta- 
hiti) by the German cruisers "Scharnhorst" and 
"Gneisenau" an American schooner was moored 
at the dock and in the direct line of fire, has 
been received in a letter from a friend at Pa- 
peete to Captain Walter H, Ferguson, The let- 
ter states that the schooner "William Olsen," 
Captain McDonald, which arrived at Papeete 
from Seattle on September 19, was moored at 
a wharf directly in front of the American Con- 



sulate and a number of mercantile establish- 
ments. During the bombardment a number of 
shells from the German vessels damaged the 
"Olsen's" rigging and one passed through her 
bows. The position of the vessel, it is stated, 
saved the consulate and other buildings from 
Ijeing demolished, acting effectively as a shield 
to them. The "Olsen," which is owned by the 
local firm of Hickman, Masterson & Co,, was 
being repaired at the time the letter was dis- 
patched, and it was expected that she would sail 
for Seattle on October 1. 

Shipping along the western coast of South 
America has been almost suspended owing to 
the reputed presence in these waters of the 
German cruiser "Leipzig," which is reported to 
have sunk several British ships during the past 
few weeks. British lines operating ships from 
Balboa to the south have withdrawn their sail- 
ings, thus delaying the mails from Santiago, 
Chile and points beyond. Only Chilean and 
Peruvian boats are now plying to the ports on 
the west coast. According to reports reaching 
here, the "Leipzig" is sailing north, but it is 
impossible to verify these rumors. Nor is there 
any confirmation of the reported sailing around 
Cape Horn of British men-of-war, which are be- 
lieved to have orders to destroy the "Leipzig." 

The Danish East Asiatic Company's new 
motor-ship, the "Malakka," a vessel of 10,000 
tons, got away from Genoa about September 
15 for San Francisco and other North Pacific 
ports. The vessel is a sister ship of the Siam, 
which created much interest in shipping circles 
during her visit here several months ago. The 
motor-ship "Malakka" was loading at Antwerp 
for Pacific Coast ports at the time the Euro- 
pean war started, but was unable to finish 
loading, consequently the owners placed the 
steamer "Kina" on berth at Copenhagen, Goth- 
enburg, Christiania and Genoa. Since then they 
have replaced her with the "Malakka," The 
"Malakka" is a twin-screw motor oil propelled 
vessel, 425 feet over all, 55 feet beam and 38,6 
depth of hold. She is of the shelter deck type, 
with four masts, six hatches and twenty-four 
derricks of steel tube type. The vessel's pro- 
pelling machinery consists of two eight-cylinder 
Diesel oil engines developing 3200 horse-power. 

Reports received from the west coast of South 
America indicate that conditions worse than 
anythine known in many years now prevail, as 
a result of the European war. The conflict 
which is now occupying the attention of the 
world has virtually halted marine traffic along 
the Pacific Coast of South America, thus put- 
ting an end in large measure to the importa- 
tion of many necessities of life. There is rea- 
son to believe that many persons in the coast 
towns are in actual want as a result of the 
stagnation of business and that, thousands are 
out of employment. Business in all ports as far 
south as Antofagasta, is declared to be virtually 
at a standstill, and a number of the largest im- 
portant export houses are said to have ceased 
doing business while they await a resumption 
of better conditions. The proclamation of a 
partial moratorium at Lima, permits banks to 
refuse payments in excess of 5 per cent, of their 
deposits weekly, while the Peruvian Govern- 
ment has ordered the stopnage of the exporta- 
tion of gold. Conditions at Guayaquil and other 
Ecuadorian ports, as well as ports in Colombia, 
are believed to be equally bad, judging from 
reports received from these localities. Ships are 
clearing from Balboa, the Pacific end of the 
Panama Canal, with little cargo and few pas- 
sengers, and several vessels are being laid up at 
Balboa pending better traffic conditions. The 
business situation in Central America is believed 
to be a little better than further south. 



PILEMEN WANTED BY STATE HARBOR 
COMMISSION. 



The California State Civil Service Commission 
announces that applications for employment as 
pilemen in connection with the State Board of 
Harbor Commissioners in San Francisco will be 
received at the office of the Commission, State 
Capitol, Sacramento, on or before October 31, 
1914, The salary is $5 per day. There are now 
several vacancies to be filled. 

Further information and application blanks 
may be secured from the State Civil Service 
Commission, State Capitol, Sacramento, Appli- 
cations must be properly executed and filed with 
the Commission on or before October 31, in 
order to be considered for this examination. 



F, R, WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco, He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention, 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg,, Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St,, near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt,) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 

ERATION. 

THOS, A. HANSON, Secretary. 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, HI, 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md„ 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St, Telephone 5153 
Chelsea, 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass,, 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S, Commerce St 
PHIDADELPHIA, Pa,. 227 Sansom St. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters (temporary): 

BOSTON. Mass., ly^A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa„ 129 Walnut St 
NEW YORK, 51 South St, and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 S, Broadway 
NORFOLK. Va„ 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala,, 104 S. Commerce St. 

HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, 214 West St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III,, 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N, Y„ 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA ^lARBOR, 0„ 21 High St 
CLEVELAND. 0„ 1401 W, 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis,, 133 Clinton St 
N, TONAWANDA, N, Y„ 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St 
ERIE, Pa„ 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich,, 7 Woodbridge St„ East 
SUPERIOR, Wis,, 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich,, 108 Fifth Ave 
OGDENSBURG, N, Y„ 70 Isabella St 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111,, 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 

Shk^co^tu' °/i.^^*^ J\ Eleventh St. 
l^HlCACiO, III., 445 La Salle Ave 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave 
MILWAUKEE, Wis,. liFReed St 
.SUPERIOR, Wis,, 1814 Fourth St 

R^v'^^T^n^^"^,?-' u^- ^- 70 Isabena St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. ""^""^ ^^ 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N, Y., 55 Main St„ Tel, Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O,, 1401 West Ninth c!t 
MILWAUKEE, Wis,, 151 Reed St 
CHICAGO, III., 406 N. Clark St 
A.SITTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St 
TOLEUO, 0„ 54 Main St 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St 
PT, HURON, Mich,, 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT. 0„ 922 Dav St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y,, 70 Isabella St 
N. TONAWANDA, N, Y.. 152 Malin St 
SUPERIOR, Wis,,' 1721 N, Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich,, 108 Fifth Ave 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E, Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111,, 9142 Mackinaw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal„ 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
yi^J£?^^' ^- C., 518 Yates St. 
VANCOUVER, B C, 213 Hasting St., B. corner of 

"^A^'cO^M^r ^S*s^'„^22?8 ^^rt^^lkh-^'^^i^™^ ^^"^ 

i^"E£SN!^^^sh.!V^^"o^'=^Bof 6 ^- "^^ ^- «^ 

lORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave,,' Box 2100 
EUREKA. Cal„ 227 First St., P O Box 64 
SAN PEDRO, Cal„ P, O. Box 67 

P,"o.'^Box^314'. "• '^■' ^°'"- '^"^®" """^ Nuuanu Sts„ 
(Continued on Pac» 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Establiihed in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montlis - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and aecomp.Tnled by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14. 1914. 



CRIMIXWL CARELESSNESS. 



'IMie Sailors' I'nion of the Pacific has 
formally rcc|uested the l\ S. Steamboat In- 
sj)ection Service to make a thorough inves- 
ti,l:,^-^ti()n into the causes which led to the 
sinkin.i^ of the steam-schooner "Francis H. 
l,e.t;.y;ett." off the Oregon coast on Septeni- 
l)cr 18. 

Runicr has it that the "Leggett" and 
other vessels of that class have, for years, 
by degrees, increased the size of their deck- 
loails. until e\'en amateurs could plainly 
sec tliat safet}- had become a second con- 
sideration — that, in fact, safety recei\'ed 
no consideration at all if it interfered with 
the deckload. 

It is re])orted also that in the pro\-erl)ial 
hurry to get the siii]) to sea and to "make 
time" at all hazards, the battening down 
of hatches has been gradually disi)ense'l 
with, because it was held that the deckload 
woidd hold down the hatches much better 
than ;ill battening. Of course, this prc- 
sum|)tiou does not take into account the 
fact tliat deckloads have to be jettisoned 
occasionally, and when that is done, as was 
evidently the case in the "Francis 11. Leg- 
gett." it is too late to batten flown hatches. 

Surely, it is high time to begin making 
haste slowly, and the Steamboat Inspection 
Service cannot afl'ord to let the "Leggett" 
disaster pass by without a most thorough 
and searchin.g investigation into all phases 
of the wreck. 

Steps should also be taken to definitely 
ascertain whether the normal, ])resent day 
deckload of lumber can be carried in all 
kinds of weather, consistent with safety. 
.Xnd if it has become the custom to con- 
\cniently f( rget about battening down the 
hatches before taking on the deckload. the 
men in authority ought to be held person- 
ally responsible for criminal negligence. 

The "Leggett" disaster snufTed out some 
seventv lives. .And while we shall never 
ha\e conclusive evidence that those seventy 
human beings were sacrificed because of 



the heavy deckload, all signs indicate that 
such was the case, and everything within 
our power ought to be done to ])rc\-ent a 
similar occurrence. 



L XnoR C.OXl^KXS .\rSTR.\M.\. 



Another great national political contest 
ii; .\ustralia has been concluded and the 
Labor party has won a magnificent victory. 

'i'he Labor party will have forty-one 
members in the House of Representatives 
and thirty-two in the Senate. The Fusion 
Liberal-Conservative representation in the 
1 louse will be thirty-three and in the Sen- 
ate four. The Labor ])art\'. therefore, made 
a net gain of four seats in the 1 louse and 
three in the Senate. 

It is said that .\ndrew l-'ischer. the miner, 
will a.gain officiate as I'rime Minister of 
.\ustralia, and with a safe working majority 
of eight in the House and overwhelming 
odds in the Senate it is likely that he will 
be able to put through considerable con- 
structive legislation, as ])romised in the 
Labor party program. It will be recalled 
that a new election was ordered on the 
issue of the government giving jireference 
to union labor in employing workers, the 
(.])l)osing Fusion i)arty — headed b}- Cook, 
a renegade labor-man — believing that the 
anti-union sentiment was still strong 
enough to return him to jiower with an in- 
creased w< irking majority, as he had a 
margin of but one in the former House. 

\A'hile this "preference" issue was kept 
well to the front and denounced as rank 
discrimination by the Cook crowd, the 
lireaking out of the war in Europe ga\e 
them additional encouragement to belie\'e 
that the Fusion administration would be re- 
turned by a substantial luajority. Ibit the 
l')ritish-Jap alliance never was poi)ular in 
.\ustralia and the electorate of .Australia 
did not look with kindly eyes upon the 
injection into the campaign of war issues. 
The Labor party made its own issues and 
stuck to them throughout the cami)aign. 
notwithstanding the most strenuous eft'orts 
if the F'usionites to switch ])nl)1ic discus- 
sion to other subjects. 

( )ne of the big items in the program 

submitted by the Labor i)arty provided for 

the establishment of "national steamships," 

i. e.. a go\ernment-owned steamshi]) line. 

\\"e (piote from one of Mr. Fischer's 

s])eeches : 

We propose to establish a line of steamers 
between the mainland and Tasmania and also 
overseas. The latter should be of increased 
speed, with resultant advantage to the passen- 
gers, sliippcrs, and the general public alike. 
I'ierce and unfair criticism of .State enterprises 
lias too long deterred a progressive people from 
taking steps to protect their own interests 
against overcharges and monopolistic influence. 

In view of the fact that the L'nited 
States Congress is considering legislation 
along similar lines we shall watch develop- 
ments in .\ustralia with added interest. It 
is a certainty that steamers owned by the 
Commonwealth of .Australia will not be 
manned bv coolie labor. .\ (loxernment 
that refused to .give "i)reference to union- 
ists" has been ousted and its successor 
will not be found wanting in that respect. 

Here's to .Australia's Labor fiovernment. 
May it long remain in power. .And may 
it alvvavs be true to Labor! 



In practice, "piece-work" and "part i)ay 
ment" are svnonvmous terms. 



CREATING A MERCHANT MARINE. 



The recent issue of the "Pacific .Marine 
r<eview" is esjiecially devote<l to the up- 
building of an .American Merchant Marine. 

Among the contributors are Mr. R. 1'. 
Schwerin. of the Pacific .Mail Steamship 
Company: Cai)tain Robert Dollar, of the 
Dollar Steamship Company: Mr. C. W. 
Dickie, the shi|)builder ; and others. 'I'he 
plans for rehabilitating a Merchant Marine, 
as advanced by these gentlemen, originate 
with the building of Noah's .Ark and w 
developed and f(\stered during the ^ 
when galley slaves furnished the nn^ 
power for most of the larger crafts afloat. 

In brief, these i)illars of modern society 
submit the following plans: 

1. .\'o C/overnmental restrictions of any 
kind whatsoever, i. e., a further sacrifice 
of the present inadequate safety regulations. 

2. I'ermitting .American vessels to carry 
the chea])est available crews. They enjoy 
this privilege at present, but "labor agi- 
tators" sometiiTies interfere — so they would 
like to have "labor leaders" either muzzled 
or wholly eliminated. l'])on this point 
their ])lans are not (|uite clear. 

?>. Subsidy, subvention and a general 
mulcting of the National treasury to put 
the ixiverty-stricken shipowners on their 
feet and enable them to give successful 
battle to all nati\e or naturalized .American 
seamen who want to earn a decent liveli- 
hood upon the sea and banish the pauper 
labor of the Orient. 

l'])on this basis, we are told, it will be 
])ossible to build an .American Merchant 
.Marine. l'i)on this basis, and no other, 
may we have the pleasure to see the Stars 
and Stripes wave from a fleet of fast and 
commodious foreign-going ships! 

We do not know how many .Americans 
want a Merchant Marine under those con- 
ditions, but we do know that no .American 
worthy of the name will ever go .into 
spasms of joy o\er a fiect of foreign-built 
ships, manned exclusively by alien crews, 
from skipi)er to deckboy, even though the 
llect be labeled ".\merican"! 



Attention is called to the corres])ondence 
ai)])earing in this issue under the cajition, 
"Taft versus (Kimpers." .\s stated at the 
head of the editorial page, the Joirnai. 
welc(Mnes c( nimunications from seafaring 
readers but is not responsible for the e.x- 
pressi(jns of correspondents. The JofRN.M. 
did not endorse the views of the corre- 
spondent who reflected unfavorably upon 
the President of the American Federation 
of Labor. The Jour \ at, does, however, be- 
lieve in giving both sides a hearing. 



When we reflect that one of the chief 
pur])oses of the trade union is to restrain 
the aggressiveness of the Government the 
idea of the compulsory arbitrationist that 
the Government should be vested with, au- 
thority to sujiersede the other chief i)nr- 
poses of trade unionism is a striking in- 
stance of incousistencw 



Conciliation and arbitration are, of 
course, v\-ell worth seeking. In the present 
imperfect state of industrial morals, how- 
ever, it is apparent that the hope of attain- 
ing these ends lies chiefly in the power 
of either or both parties to fall back upon 
the sterner alternative. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LABOR CRUSHERS EXPOSED. 

Organized labor is on the eve of a com- 
plete victory in the war started by the 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Employers' 
Association of Stockton, Cal. 

J. P. Emerson, with several sets of ini- 
tials and a number of aliases, who for 
many weeks was the ])et sleuth of the 
" iiants. Manufacturers and Employers' 
•;-iation, has made some interesting' 
roulessions. 

Emerson is about as prolific with con- 

fessir)ns as he was with reports to his em- 

rs — copies of which have, for some 

wii..., been in the possession of the union 

labor officials. 

In his first confession, he implicated 
IL C. Brokaw and a number of "higher- 
ups" in the labor crushing combine. Bro- 
kaw and his attorneys then spent two hours 
in Emerson's cell in the Martinez jail, and 
after this visit John P. Irish Jr. and Mrs. 
Emerson called, with the result that Mr. 
Emerson made another confession wherein 
he exonerated A-Ir. Brokaw from any guilt 
or connection with the dynamite frame-up 
and plot against the unions and labor offi- 
cials in this State. 

In all of his confessions, Emerson ad- 
mitted that the whole dynamite plot was a 
frame-up on the unions, and that no mem- 
lier of union labor had any knowledge of 
what the perpetrator was doing. Of course, 
in this he makes a mistake, because copies 
of his reports portraying his operations are, 
and have been for weeks, in the possession 
of trade union officials of the State. These 
have all been turned over to the Stockton 
and vSan Joaquin County authorities, to- 
gether with a large amount of evidence 
which is fast being accumulated every day 
against the directors and managers of the 
M. M. & E. 

'I'he labor officials of Stockton and the 
authorities of San Joaquin County are not 
satisfied with the way Sherifif Veale of 
Contra Costa County handled the case. 
They believe he has been trying to pro- 
tect the high officials of the Merchants, 
Manufacturers and Employers' Associa- 
tion — notably John P. Irish Sr. and John 
P. Irish Jr. They claim to have evidence 
which tends to prove their contention in 
this regard. A further expose which will 
show up the wonderful ramifications of this 
case may be expected any day. At any 
rate, it is understood that Emerson will 
])lead guilty to the three charges placed 
against him and take his medicine. 

It is alleged that the Merchants, Manu- 
facturers and Employers' Association will 
take care of his family, and also that Mr. 
Emerson, after he serves a short prison 
term, will receive an easy berth. How- 
ever, no one can tell when Emerson will 
make a new confession which may upset 
the M. M. & E.'s program. This is the 
essence of the confession he first made, 
while the tears were rolling down his 
cheeks : 

J. P. Emerson, acknowledged In' 11. C. 
Brokaw of the Merchants, Manufacturers 
and Employers' Association to be an oper- 
ative in the employ of the M. AJ. & E., 
made a complete confession in the Martinez 
jail late Eriday afternoon of the alleged 
facts of his connection with the associa- 
tion and the bringing of dynamite to 
Stockton to be "planted" here and later 



"discovered," the blame for the presence of 
the explosive to be laid at the door of the 
labor unions. 

As a result of the disclosures made by 
Emerson, Richard Carlisle and Fred Wil- 
son, other operatives employed by the M. 
M. & E. through H. C. Brokaw, who had 
charge of the strikebreakers and so-called 
"gunmen," were also taken into custody. 
They were questioned at length by Dis- 
trict Attorney Foltz and Chief of Police 
Briare, and finally locked in the county jail 
by order of District Attorney Eoltz. 

Warren Atherton, an attorney who states 
that he is employed by the Merchants, 
Manufacturers and Employers' Association, 
remained at the jail with Carlisle and Wil- 
son throughout the rest of the night. 

Emerson, in his confession, declared that 
H. C. Brokaw told him that members of 
the M. M. & E. were becoming dissatisfied 
and were beginning to complain. Brokaw 
said, according to Emerson, "We've got to 
pull ofT something or we won't be able to 
hold our jobs." 

Emerson stated that he was given in- 
structions Ijy Brokaw to rob boxcars con- 
taining dynamite and to bring the explo- 
sives to Stockton. Brokaw told him, he 
said, that it would be best to rob the cars 
"in transit." According to Emierson, the 
dynamite was to be brought to Stockton 
and planted in four places, to wit: The 
Sperry flour mills, the Hotel Stockton, the 
Samson Iron Works and Totten & Brandt's 
mill. The men were instructed, Emerson 
says, to place no dynamite caps in the 
stocks of powder, but they were to provide 
fuse so that it would appear that the dyna- 
mite had been planted and was ready to 
be touched off. Emerson said he was in- 
structed to be very careful and have no 
dynamite caps, as they didn't really want 
any explosion to occur. Emerson said a 
sensational expose of the dynamite plants 
was to be made, and the unions were to be 
accused of doing the jobs. 

The foregoing are some of the sensations 
sprung by Michael Casey and Olaf Tveit- 
nioe at a labor mass meeting held at 
Stockton in the Yosemite Theatre, when 
Casey and Tveitmoe made a dynamite con- 
si)iracy charge against the Merchants, 
Manufacturers and Employers' Association. 

The evidence, reports, affidavits and con- 
fessions, written, signed and sworn to by 
paid sleuths and gunmen in the employ of 
the M. M. & E. were read and submitted 
by Michael Casey. 

There were also exhibited by Casey a 
Colt automatic revoh'er, the property of 
L. S. Calkins, secretary of the association, 
with which Calkins armed one of the de- 
tectives in his employ : and blackjacks and 
one of the twelve revolvers purchased by 
the M. M. & E. for use by the army of 
"sluggers," sleuths, detectives and gunmen 
in its employ. 

Then there was presenlcd to the audi- 
ence, as "Exhibit .A," Hans Le jeune, re- 
siding at 44.T Franklin street, San Fran- 
cisco, one of the sleuths employed by the 
M. M. & E., who submitted a written con- 
fession, sworn before a notary pid)lic, 
which was read by Michael Casey. 

Casey challenged any member of the M. 

-M. & E. to deny the truth of any statement 

contained in the confession, and ofTered to 

turn o\'cr to them their property, consist- 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Hcad(|uarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 1914. 

.V .synopsis of the minutes of the regular meet- 
ing held on the above date will he published in 
next week's issue. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 

Victoria, B. C, Oct. 5, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 

R. TOWNSKND, Agent. 
518 Yates St. Phone 1325. 

Vancouver, R. C, Oct. 5, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

Tacoma Agency, Oct. 5, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 5, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 440,3. 



.Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 5, 1914. 
Shiijping slack; prospects uncertain. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 5, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 44 Union Ave. North, Tel. 
East 4912. 



Eureka .Agency, Oct. 5, 1914, 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553, 



San Pedro Agency, Oct, 5, 1914, 
Shijiping fair; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepdlveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel, 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept, 28, 1914. 
.Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San h'rancisco, Cal,, Oct. 8, 1914. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slow, 

EUGENE STEIDLE. Secretary. 

42 Market St, Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle .Agency, Oct, 1, 1914, 
Shipping slow; plenty of men ashore. Nomi- 
nated officers for the ensuing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. Box No. 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 

San Pedro Agency, Oct. 1, 1914. 
Shipping better; shipi)ing improving. Nomi- 
nated officers for the ensuing term. 

HARRY POTHOI'I', .Agent, 
P. O, Box 54, 



Portland Agency, Oct. 5, 1914. 
.Shi])ping improving. Nominated officers lor 
the ensuing term, 

THOM.AS BAKER. .Agent. 
27/2 Second St., Rickle Bldg., Room 10. Phone 
.Main 0731. 



DIED. 

The following members were drowned in the 
wreck of the steam-schooner "Francis H. Leg- 
'Tett," Sept. 18, 1914: 

,'\utrust .Allen, No. 1900, a native of Russia, 
age 29. 

.\r^•ul Kollgrcn, No, 1073. ;i native of Sweden, 
age 26, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE PROBLEM OF PROPERTY. 



There is more trouble in the world over 
the division of property than flows from 
any other source; to the discerning it can 
be traced from the multiplied miseries of 
the slum districts to the divorce court 
troubles of the over-rich. It is the great 
foundation social problem. 

There are just two kinds of property in 
this country to-day. One is property made 
by law, and the other is property made 
by labor. The first is called real property 
by the lawyers, probably to conceal its ar- 
tificial character. The second is called per- 
sonal property, and improvements upon 
land lumped together with land and called 
real estate, which also adds to the mental 
confusion of people, and keeps them from 
recognizing the fundamental difference be- 
tween the two things which are in their 
nature wholly dissimilar. 

One reason why law-made property is 
called real is because its possession enables 
the owner to get personal property easier 
and in larger quantities than by any other 
method. In this sense it is very real in- 
deed. 

In a wholesome and rational society 
there would be but one kind of property, 
and it would consist of the things made 
by labor alone. Xo other kind of prop- 
erty would be tolerated in a truly civilized 
state. 

The reason for this is apparent when 
the real nature of law-made property is 
candidly and carefully considered. Prop- 
erty in land, franchises and patent rights is 
law-made. These things depend for their 
validity wholly upon the law. * * * 

More than half of the national wealth 
enumerated by the statisticians, totaling 
120 billions, is purely fiat property; it is 
tribute-levying power capitalized into un- 
thinkable sums, made by pure fiat of law 
and upheld by it. 

This is not true of the othear half. Law- 
made property does not pay insurance. 
There is no fire risk. It does not rot and 
rust and melt away like labor-made prop- 
erty. It is not perishable. 

When a city is destroyed by fire, the 
owners of labor-made property lose every- 
thing. The owners of law-made property 
lose nothing. 

Not only do they not lose by the fire and 
earthquake, but they gain enormously. 
Ask any real estate man in San Francisco 
what effect the fire had on land values, 
and he will tell you that in many cases it 
doubled the value of the land in many 
quarters before the ashes were cold, be- 
cause the very prospect of a newer, finer 
and more modern city, built by labor out 
of steel, concrete, terra cotta, brick and 
stone, made building sites more valuable. 
Such is the power of land monopoly 
backed by the law. 

Now, the only real reason why law- 
made property is valued by its owners is 
because it enables them to take an enor- 
mous amount of labor-made property from 
those who produce it, without giving any- 
thing in exchange. This is the real al- 
chemy that transmutes base metal into 
gold in the twentieth century. 

Were it not for this peculiar quality, this 
toll-taking capacity, law-made property 
would have no advantage whatever and no 
one would want it. And it is precisely 
because it has this power that investors 
seek it everywhere. * * * 



Wealth is made by labor, not law. The 
law cannot make wealth. The law can only 
take it. This is the chief function of the 
law: to first take it and then safeguard it. 
This is the big thing in investments. 
Great is the law. 

Our whole civilized society revolves 
around the idea of conserving investments 
rather than conserving men, and when the 
major portion of property holdings are 
law-made and law-sustained, it follows in 
logical sequence that, in order to maintain 
the integrity of investments, as they are 
recognized today, men must be sacrificed 
by the million. And so they are, and the 
women and children of the poor are thrown 
in together for good measure. And it 
must be so; it cannot be otherwise while 
law-made property exists on the scale that 
it does today. 

If society continues to guarantee the 
integrity of law-made property, it can do 
so only at the expense of labor-made 
property and the producers thereof. There 
is no other way of doing it. 

This is the true explanation of the high 
cost of living, and no other explanation 
fits the case, in the face of the colossal 
productive powers of the twentieth cen- 
tury. 

The tribute-levying power of law-made 
property is limited only by the tribute- 
paying capacity of the makers of labor-pro- 
duced property. 

This is the true reason why the unskilled 
laborer's life is a nightmare instead of a 
doubt the naval record of this plan that 
holiday, as it should be, with science at 
his beck and call, as it is today, and this is 
why the skilled man feels every day more 
insecure, and the whole world of labor 
is groaning under the burdens heaped up 
by the certain but intangible processes of 
the law. 

Law-made property is the foundation 
evil of modern society. It is subterranean 
in its operation, all-powerful, irresistible 
and mysterious. To the uninitiated it is 
complex, but to any one who can analyze 
a problem and separate in logical fashion 
its several elements, the matter has an easy 
solution. 

The problem is wholly economic. It is 
not a war of classes. * * * 

The friction is between men and an in- 
stitution, woven into the very warp and 
woof of our industrial civilization. It is 
an irrepressible conflict between property 
I)r()duced by men and property produced 
by law, and nothing short of its utter neu- 
tralization will avail us of the twentieth 
century anything; nothing short of this 
heroic and yet necessary treatment will 
save our social lives, and individual lives 
as well, in many cases. 

We cannot avert national destruction if 
we permit property to cover its present 
enormous territory. It is too expansive 
Its boundaries are too wide. It must be 
contracted to fit its proper sphere and ful- 
fill its proper mission. It must be limited 
and fixed. Only that is property that is 
produced by human toil. 

This is the simple, scientific, just, ob- 
vious, logical, defensible and necessary 
limit upon property. Until we fix such a 
limit we shall always be confronted with 
the certainty that property will devour 
mankind. — Henry H. Hardinge, in Reedy's 
Mirror. 



AN ENGLISH VIEW OF THE WAR. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



It is a sad reflection that nations which 
are the leaders of European culture should 
be involved in a brutal and devastating 
conflict. Everyone feels that it is wretched 
to be engaged in warfare against a nation 
which has made so great contributions to 
science, art and literature as Germany has, 
and on all sides the sentiment is heard: 
"We have no quarrel with the German peo- 
ple; it is Prussian bureaucracy that has 
forced us into this." 

This is in part an explanation, but it is 
not enough. There remains the question, 
why did the common people of Germany, 
France, and Britain, who will pay for it in 
blood and suffering, permit their rulers to 
declare war? In a great measure because 
the common people, if not actuated by hos- 
tile feelings to the common people of other 
countries, are filled with suspicion of them 
through ignorance, and that ignorance is 
due to the fact that they are all exploited 
by unrighteous economic adjustments which 
concentrate wealth in the hands of a few 
and leave the masses poor. A degree of 
economic emancipation which would per- 
mit the ordinary citizen of one country to 
become acquainted with the citizens of 
other countries in their own homes, and 
become acquainted with their literature and 
their ideals, would make war an impossi- 
bility, for no ruling class could get the 
popular support necessary in order to carry 
it on. . . . 

Swiftly and surely war will exact its 
tribute of money and blood and suffering 
from every family in the country; and they 
have grounds for saying so who say that 
war is madness; but there are other mad- 
nesses — the economic madness, which day 
after day takes its toll of wretchedness and 
suffering. If only the casualties in the 
battle of life were all collected and pub- 
lished day after day in an Official Gazette! 
Then we should read : Killed by evil hous- 
ing conditions, so many ; killed by long toil 
and low wages, so many; killed by starva- 
tion, who could not get enough bread to 
keep them alive, so many. And then the 
long list of the wounded — those blighted 
and careworn lives ! And the women and 
the little children. 

It is natural that humanity should be 
moved by the vivid sufferings of war, but 
it is eternally wrong and sad and unjust 
that so little should be done for the suf- 
ferings of peace. Little is done to relieve 
them, still less is done to eradicate the 
causes of suffering. Let not more spec- 
tacular things withdraw too much attention 
from the main object that all should have 
in view — to put an end to economic ex- 
ploitation. In order to put an end to war 
madness we must put an end to economic 
enslavement. Territorial aggrandizement 
will not be an objective of peoples who 
are allowed to make use of the land of 
their own country. Culture and leisure 
too will come when mankind are allowed 
to use to the utmost the kindly earth which 
is the source of all wealth. And with cul- 
ture and leisure will come that international 
solidarity which all must desire, the mu- 
tual understanding, trust and forbearance 
which will make war impossible. — Land 
\'alues (London). 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DISRUPTED. 



We have often asserted that an organ- 
ization of workers, once fairly established, 
can safely meet all attempts to defeat its 
purpose that may be directed from the 
outside. 

Disruption, if it comes, must come from 
within. Disappointed office-seekers; revo- 
lutionists in a hurry — men who can not 
wait for the slow but necessary processes 
of evolution ; plain crooks masquerading as 
advanced union advocates — these are the 
disruptive forces that may bring about the 
dissolution of any or all of the great organ- 
izations of the toilers. 

A case in point is the situation at Butte, 
Montana. Whether those who are respon- 
sible for the complete smashing of the 
powerful organization there had any real 
grievance we are not prepared to say. If 
they had they themselves have destroyed 
every ground on which they might have 
based their grievances. 

They claim that a small clique ran the 
affairs of the union to their own liking and 
to the detriment of the great majority. To 
admit their claims to be just would mean 
that the great majority were careless, cow- 
ardly, or both. 

If they had real grievances the courts of 
their organization were ever open for them. 

It was* to find out whether their com- 
plaints were meritorious that brought Pres- 
ident Moyer of the Western Federation of 
Miners, and President James Lord of the 
Mining Department of the A. F. of L., to 
Butte. 

What was the evidence presented to 
them ? 

Destruction of the union hall ; the loot- 
ing of the safe in which might be expected 
to be found all evidence bearing out or 
contradicting their contention. A cowardly 
attempt upon the lives of the officials of 
the organization who had come to the city 
to investigate the grievances. These ac- 
tions spoke louder than words that they 
could not bring forward record of facts to 
bear out their complaints. 

But the situation as it exists at present ! 

The contention of the disruptors is that 
they expected to build on the ruins of the 
union that had done so much for them and 
for humanity, a better, fairer organization. 

But the men who had sacrificed and suf- 
fered in the u])building of the wrecked 
union will have none of them. They only 
see the ruin and the destruction wrought. 
They do not believe, nor can they be ex- 
pected to believe, the ultimate benevolence 
of the intentions of these wreckers. 

A labor organization must have the con- 
fidence of nearly all the workers e'er it can 
expect to become a force for good. 

The union men of Butte, they who have 
built up the reputation of that city as the 
"Gibraltar of Unionism," will never repose 
confidence in the so-called leaders, whose 
only claim for consideration is the havoc 
they have wrought. 

And so we behold the workers hope- 
lessly divided. The employers who were 
once favorable to organized labor, forced 
to appeal to the Government for protection 
from the contending factions. 

Butte, Montana, must stand as a warn- 
ing to honest impossibilists of the havoc 
that can be brought about by ill-advised, 
unreasoning violence. It will also be con- 
sidered bv the enemies of organized labor 



as an object lesson, pointing the only way 
by which the forces of labor may be hope- 
lessly divided, and thus left helpless to 
their tender mercies. — United Mine Work- 
ers' Journal. 



MAGNETIC COMPASS DOOMED. 



The magnetic compass — the "needle" of 
the sailor — is doomed. In warships and 
the great liners, it is now being replaced by 
the gyroscopic compass whose governing 
principle is that the axle of a rapidly rotating 
disc tends always to align itself with the 
axis of the earth. In fact, the shaft of every 
flywheel, of every dynamo and motor, is 
striving vainly, against the restraint of its 
bearings, to turn to the geographic north. 
This directive action of the earth is very 
feeble, but, in the gyroscopic compass, it is 
reinforced by electric power, so that it shall 
act instantly at any change in the ship's 
course and thus keep the axle of the disc 
always pointing northward. In effect, then, 
this axle is now the "needle." 

In 1851 Foucault, the French physicist, 
while demonstrating the rotation of the earth, 
detected this effect of terrestrial action on 
the gyroscope which he was using. His dis- 
covery is the basic principle of the gyroscopic 
compass as perfected sixty years later by an 
American engineer, Elmer A. Sperry. Thirty- 
five of our battleships and 20 of our sub- 
marines are now equipped with it; it is used 
also by many foreign navies. In battleships, 
the standard magnetic compass must be 
placed in the cage ma.st to reduce the effect 
upon it of the tons of steel in the hull. The 
non-magnetic gyroscopic compass is located in 
a protected position below the water line, 
and, by electricity, actuates auxiliary repeat- 
ing compasses at the wheel and in the con- 
ning tower. In a submarine, the magnetic 
compass is subjected to many disturbing in- 
fluences and is almost useless, while the gyro- 
scopic compass is unaffected. 

"True as the needle to the pole" is poetic 
license, since the needle points to the mag- 
netic, not the geographic, pole, and it is 
deflected from the magnetic north by the 
amount of the "variation" diie to local mag- 
netic conditions and by that of the "devia- 
tion" due to the fact that a steel ship is itself 
a magnet. In changing his course, the navi- 
gator must allow for both these factors in 
his fairly complex problem. When all is 
said, however, the passing of the magnetic 
needle from its long and noble service on the 
oceans of the world will bring a thrill of 
regret to many an old sailor. — Public Ledger. 



VERSATILE WILLIE HEARST. 



Says the New York Herald : Our dis- 
tinguished friend, Mr. Hearst, is "all things 
to all men." He is the only original neu- 
tral, and he defies any one to offer a better 
brand of neutrality than he does. In his 
various English papers he is the greatest 
friend of the allies, while in his German 
sheet they receive scant courtesy. 

On Wednesday the American published 
a ])icture with the line: "This is the type 
of English soldier who is doing such tre- 
mendous work on the battle-front in 
France." 

But on the same day the German edi- 
tion, publishing the very same "cut," 
marked it: "British troops who arc able 
to sprint so fast that German soldiers 
cannot catch up with them." 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman wrho finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAT CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 
BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG. N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 2295. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO. ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITAI^: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS: 
Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. T. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ceen Bay, Mich. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

R'ie. Pa. Superior, Wis. 

McTiomlnee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



industry of which tliey arc made u]) or in 
which they are employed. 

If the plan of amalgamation is ratified by 
])o])ular vote of each organization, tlie amal- 
gamation shall take effect April 1.^. l''l.^, 
and the National Stogie Makers" League 
shall in that event and on that date, name- 
ly. April l.T, 1'>L\ automatically disband 
and cease to exist as such, and all prop- 
erties and funds of the National Stogie 
Makers" League, not otherwise determined 
by the laws of the C. M. I. L". of A. and 
this agreement, shall be forwarded to the 
headcpiarters * f the Cigar Makers" Interna- 
tional I'nion of America. Chicago. 111. 

The referendum vote to be taken by each 
organization during the month of March. 



German Unions Helpful. 

It is gathered from scattering reports 
coming from war-lnnind countries that the 
German trade-unions are assisting in pro- 
viding for the families of those who have 
been drafted for service in the ])resent war. 
It is stated that the German trade-unions 
are also l)aying relief to the unemployed 
and in some cases war relief. For instance, 
the \drwaerts gives the following rates of 
relief being extended : 

Wood Workers. 6 shillings per week for 
married men and 4 shillings for unmarried 
or unemployed. For the support of fami- 
lies of those drafted for war. 3 shillings per 
week. Printers are paying unemidoyment 
benefits. The Textile Workers have re- 
duced their unemployment benefits to two- 
thirds the usual amount, and a cpiarter of 
this is granted as war relief. The Brewers, 
Millers, Stokers, Knginemen, and Trans- 
]>iirt Workers are paying out unem|)loy- 
ment benefits, but war relief is urgently 
needed, and the Miners ha\e voted $2.^0,- 
000 for war and relief purposes. Tobacco 
Workers are receiving (> shillings per week 
for unem])Ioyment and 2 shillings for sup- 
port of families of those drafted for war. 
Saddlers are paying a levy varying from 
.T to 10 i)er cent, iiicrease on their usual 
subscri])ti( ns. and unemployment l)cnefits 
are being i)ai(l out at the rate of 7 shillings 
per week for men and .^ shillings per week 
for women. 



1897. 
Feb. 9— Senate, 34 to 31. 
.Mar. 3 — House, 193 to 37 (over President 
Cleveland"s veto). 

1898. 
Ian. 17— Senate, 4? to 28. 

1902. 
.Mav 22 — House, Sf> to 7 (in cummiltcc). 
May 27 — House, Xo division. 

l')06. 
.May 23 — v^cnate. Test added by amend- 
ment. 
June — Senate, .\o di\ision. 

1912. 
A])ril — Senate, 'Pest added by amend- 
ment, .^7 to 8. 
April 1'^ — Senate. \d division, but only 2 

votes against. 
Dec. 18— House. 178 to ?2. 

1913. 
Jan. 17— House. 149 to 70. 
Jan. 2.^ — House, K/) to 71. 
Jan. 27 — House, .\gree to conference. 
'an. 27 — .Senate, .\grcc to conference. 
Feb. 18 — Senate, 72 to 18 ('over President 

Taft"s veto). 
Feb. 19— House, 213 to 114 (on veto). 

1914. 
l''el). .=^ — House. 2:^2 to \2fi. 

There have thus been seven record votes 
in tile House, and the average of these 
\-otes was 192 to 73: and five record votes 
in the Senate, the average vote being 52 
V< 19. 



DISTRIBUTION OF FISH. 



Record of Immigration Legislation. 
I'^or years the .American Federation ol 
Labor has persistently advocated the pas- 
sage of an immigration l)ill which will re- 
strict immigration. The Congressional 
Commission, ajjpointed in 1907, made a 
thorough investigation of the immigration 
(|uestion, and its main recommendation was 
that a literacy test be incorporated in a bill 
regulating immigration. It is interesting 
to note that in the last eighteen years there 
have been nineteen xotes in Congress in 
favor of the reading test for aliens. Three 
of these were votes in Committee of the 
Whole House on the State of the I'nion 
and sixteen were votes jjassing a bill, of 
which two were votes to pass over a Presi- 
dential veto. The dates and the \f>tes are 
as follows: 

1896. 
May 20— House. 195 to 2h. 
Dec. 17 — Senate, ?2 to 10. 



KILLING THE BOYS. 



The German, like the French, standing 
Jirmy is. of course, composed of boys be- 
tween the ages of eighteen and twenty- 
four. Each year a third of the army goes 
back to cixilian life and a new third is re- 
cruited. Xone of these are. of course, mar- 
ried : hence there are few widows being 
made b_\- the German fighting around Liege. 
if this is any compensation for the loss of 
the flower of the country's youth. It is 
unly when the I'rench and German reserv- 
ists join the first line that married and 
older men are in action. This is. by the 
way, (luite unlike the record of our own 
\olunteer regiments in which so many <if 
the men were married. .\s for the I'rcnch 
and Cierman ncju-commissioned officers, 
they arc. of course, in large part profes- 
sional soldiers and family men, like their 
officers. Put their soldiers are too often 
mere boys just out of school, without the 
faintest a])i)reciation, i)crha])s, of what the 
war is all about. In a sense, these armies 
are democratic, because the sons of rich 
and ])oor alike serve : the educated for a 
year only, and ])erha])s in crack regiments; 
but there is no class in France or Germany 
that will not pay a terrible price in young 
men for the inhumanity that is .going on 
to-dav. — .\'ew York Evening Post. 



Secretary of Commerce Redfield has just 
been informed by the Commissioner of 
Fisheries that advance reports received 
from the fish-cidtural stations of the Bu- 
reau if Fisheries in all jiarts of the coun- 
try indicate that during the fiscal year 
which closeii June 30, 1''14. the mimber of 
food and game fishes propagated and dis- 
tributed by the Bureau was considerably 
in excess of that of any previous year. The 
outi)ut was approximately 4,000,000,000, of 
which 48.\000.000 represented the migra- 
tory food fishes of the .Atlantic Coast 
streams. 1,000.000,000 the commercial fishes 
of the Great Lakes, 2,2,^0,000,000 the im- 
]M rtant food fishes of the .North Atlantic 
Coast, over 200,000,000 the salmons of the 
Pacific seaboard, and the remainder the 
fishes of the minor interior waters. 

I )istributions of fishes suitable for stock- 
ing barren waters, or for restocking public 
waters which have become depleted, were 
made in practically every State of the L'n- 
ion aufl in .\laska, while tiiousands of small 
inland ponds and lakes, the majority of 
them located on farms, were stocked with 
black bass, crappies, sunfishes, catfishes, 
and other desirable species. 

( )f the enormous output for the year, 98 
per cent, represents the commercial food 
fishes and a very large percentage of these 
were hatched frt)m eggs which would have 
been entirely lost had it not been for the 
acti\ities of the Bureau of Fisheries. 

Coincident with the augmented output 
there has been a decided improvement in 
the effectiveness of x'arious branches of the 
fish-cidtural work, as an example of w'hich 
may be mentioned the rearing to the finger- 
ling and yearling stages of many millions 
of fish formerly distributed as fry. This 
feature of the work is to receive even 
greater attention hereafter, as most decided 
ad\ ances may be made along this line. 



He is indeed a bold i)ro])het wlm pre- 
tends to forecast either the probability or 
improbability of future usefulness of any 
raw material. As has been illustrated by 
the radium mineral carnotite, the mineral- 
ogic curosity of one decade may become 
the valuable ore of the next. .Again, the 
principal ore of aluminum, bauxite, was 
not even mentioned in a list of useful min- 
erals published by the I'nited States Geo- 
logical Survey 2.^ years ago. ('Bulletin 
.^99, U. S. (Geological Survey.") 



Owing to the fact that Sweden has enor- 
mous peat deposits, many attempts have 
been made during the last few years to in- 
vent and develop devices for utilizing these 
deposits. Many ex]:)eriments have been 
m;ide in stoking stationary engines, and the 
results have apparently been satisfactory. 
Ouite recently experiments have been made 
in stoking railway engines, and it is claimed 
that these cft'orts have also been crowned 
with success. The heating power of Swe- 
dish peat is such that one and eight-tenths 
tons of clod peat are equivalent to one ton 
of English steam coal. .A young Swedish 
engineer has been conducting the experi- 
ments with railway engines under official 
control. With a device invented by him- 
self he has made trial stokings with pul- 
verized peat on one of the state raihva}' 
engines with coal and peat simultaneously, 
and has even made one and three-tenths 
tons of peat do the work of one ton of 
coal. .As a result of these tests ])eat- 
powder stoking has been introduced on 
the Halmstad-Nassjo Railroatl and the Kal- 
mar Railroad, besides which the Swedish 
.■-tate railways have procured a trial railway 
engine for peat-powder stoking. The Fin- 
nish government railways are now con- 
structing four railway engines to be stoked 
in this manner. 



i'or fair jiroducts of all kinds consult the 
oirn.al's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



LABOR CRUSHERS EXPOSED. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



int; of the exhibit of blackjacks and pistols, 
if they would step to the platform and 
claim them. The challenge was not ac- 
cc])tc(l. althoti.^h a number of members of 
the .M. -M. ('<: i{. were in the audience of 
oOOf) pcojile. 

T\eitm(;e and Casey chari^ed tlic M. M. 
iv ]\. with beini; res])(.)nsible for the jilot 
hatched by their emissaries to ])lant dyna- 
mite under a building in Stockton, to 
which J. J. Emerson has already con- 
fessed, in order to throw suspicion on and 
discredit the labor unions. 

There was also read the "hospital list" 
el' the ?\f. ]\r. & E., containing the names 
of twent}- i)rominent trade-unionists whom 
the liirelings of the I\T. M. & !•'. had been 
instructed to "get." For this work they 
were to be paid from $2.^ to $?0 per man. 
according to the importance of the "labor 
agitator." 

Tx'eitmoe announced that the information 
gi\'en to the jDublic was onh' ])reliminary 
to the expose of the tactics of the Al. M. 
I.S.- E. to be made at the trials of its i)aid 
emissaries now under arrest or for whom 
warrants ha\'e been issued. 

Tvcitmoe said that it had been planned 
l<i make a fidl expose at the mass meeting 
but since the arrest of Emerson and Car- 
lisle the authorities had requested that the 
most incriminating evidence be withheld 
until such time as the men shall be brought 
t(j trial. 

Here is the statement sworn to b\- one 
of their gun men : 

Affidavit by Strikebreaker. 

City and County (if San Francisco, State of 
California — ss. 

The undersigned, lieing first duly sv\orn, de- 
poses and says as follows: 

My name is Hans Le Jeunc. I am ;i native of 
Germany and have been in the United States 
for about eight years. My residence at pres- 
ent is 44,S Franklin street, San Francisco. I 
have been employed off and on by the Mer- 
chants, Manufacturers and Employers' Associa- 
tion of Seattle and Portland as a strikebreaker 
and a director of strikebreakers in those cities 
for the last seven years. 

On or about August 1st 1 was sent by Mr. 
Francis of Portland to Stockton, California. 
There 1 reported to Calkins and Mr. Bailey of 
the Merchants, Manufacturers and Employers' 
Association of Stockton. Mr. Bailey directed 
me to get some more men and take charge of 
them, which I did. I engaged eighteen men all 
told. Among them being C. H. Miller, R. Car- 
lisle. A. D. Duncan, B. Stefifens, J. H. Chad- 
wick. William Roberts, Fred Wilson, J. A. Hill, 
A. Andrea, W. H. Weir, W. C. Gray, Frank 
Purfura, R. S. Fitzgeiald, J. J. Emerson; that 
these tnen with others reported to me in Stock- 
ton at the -Santa Fe depot, whereupon I took 
tliem to the Hotel Bronx and assigned them to 
their work, which consisted of protecting the 
non-union men at work, and also as members 
of the employers' slugging crew; that these men 
were all furnished with pick handles and a 
number of them with blackjacks, and some of 
them with revolvers; that I was given a special 
.^8-caliber Smith & Wesson and a 32-caliber 
Colt automatic, the latter being the personal 
I>roperty of Mr. Calkins; that I bought twelve 
38-caliber police special Smith & Wesson re- 
volvers on an order furnished by Mr. Calkins 
upon a hardware store located on the square 
near the Stockton Hotel; that T also bought a 
"umbcr of belts, holsters and cartridges; that 
I was directed by Mr. Bailey to issue the guns 
and the cartridges, belts and holsters to the 
men; that 1 was further instructed to order the 
men to go out on the different jobs and visit 
bui'dinrrs in course of construction, shops and 
mills; that Mr. Bailey said: "'One good turn 
ileservrs another.' If trouble occurs, dig right 
in and beat them up." This T understood to 
mean both for men and women, as the women 
particularly were making trouble by their pres- 
ence: that H. C. Brokaw. the general in com- 
mand of the M., M. & E. strikebreakers and 
^^higgine brigade, directed me to take a crew of 
four nien and beat up two union electricians; 
that I took with me Miller. Steffens and Wil- 
son; tint wc did not beat up the two men as 
directed; that we were later discharged because 



we did not beat up the union electricians; that 
upon the special direction of Mr. Bailey and 
the order of Calkins, I secured three known 
gunmen — namely, Chadwick, Wilson and Dun- 
can — about the 4th of August, to "get" Jo- 
hannsen; that I met Mr. Carlisle at Third and 
Market streets, San Francisco, who introduced 
the men to me, whereupon I told them to meet 
me .at the Ferry depot at about 2:30 o'clock; 
that wc went to .Stockton that afternoon to- 
gether on the Western Pacific Railroad; that 
upon arriving at Stockton I gave them $.S 
apiece, and one of them a blackjack, and told 
them to go and look for Johannsen; that I had 
an understanding to pay them $25 apiece to 
"get" Johannsen and make a good job of it, 
and that it was up to them to do it. I under- 
stand that at least one of them was armed 
with a revolver, and that all of them had black- 
jacks; that Brokaw told me to "get" all the 
members of the union strike committee, and 
especially "Tincan" Smith; that Carlisle has what 
lie terms a hospital list, which contains the 
names of union oificials and members aggregat- 
ing more than twenty in nuinber; that during 
my employment by the Stockton M., M. & E., 
1 paid out to the men $825; that this money 
was furnished me in various amounts by Mr. 
Bailey, Mr. Brokaw and Mr. F. J. Viebrock of 
the Austin Hardware Company; that Mr. Vie- 
brock of the Austin Hardware Company said when 
he gave me the seventy-five dollars ($75) on 
Thursday, August 6th, in the ofifice of the Aus- 
tin Hardware Company, that he did not want 
to be known in it or mixed up in the affair, 
and that I should forget that he ever gave me 
any money, or words to that effect; that the 
rnoney paid to me by Viebrock was taken from 
the cash register in the store of the Austin 
Hardware Company and was to pay the three 
men who were to "get" Johannsen; that Mr. 
\'iebroi.'k two days thereafter furnished me with 
two dozen pick handles; that on or about Au- 
gust 7th at the Stockton Hotel I had a con- 
versation with R. Carlisle, wherein he related 
to me that there was a plot by the unions to 
blow up the Sperry Flour Company's mill; that 
Johannsen and Mooney were instigating it; 
that Mooney was in Stockton at that time, 
looking for a flat-bottom motor boat wherewith 
to make his "getaway," as there was only one 
way to approach the mill, which was from the 
slough; that Johannsen and Mooney were each 
carrying a fuse in their pocket with which to 
set off the charge; that the unions had prom- 
ised $5000 to the man who pulled off the job. 
payable the next day; that Carlisle told me I 
had a chance to make $6000 to catch them and 
get the evidence: that Carlisle said Emerson 
wa> on the trail of Johann.sen and Mooney, 
arid th;il Emerson could have all the money he 
wanted from the Merchants. Manufacturers and 
Employers: that I met Carlisle in front of the 
Stockton Hotel Wednesday morning, September 
23d; that he asked me what I was doing in 
Stockton, if 1 was looking for a position, 
whereupon he told me that he would be able 
to put me in a good place, as there was a job 
to be pulled off in the Sperry flour mills: that 
1 told him that 1 would not go to work for 
the Merchants, Manufacturers and Employers 
aeain unless 1 received $15 per day and ex- 
penses, and a ninety-day contract; that Carlisle 
then said he did not know whether the Mer- 
cli.inls. Manufacturers and Employers would pay 
that salary or not. 

Tlial it is \u\ firm belief, best impression and 
stUlcd oniiiion. from these conversations had 
with Carlisle, that the agents of the Alerchants. 
Manufacturers and Emplovers' Association of 
Stockton were framing a dvnamite iob on the 
unions and the members of the unioiis' strikf> 
committee and other officials of the union labor 
organizations: that Fred Wilson, who drives an 
automobile, told me Saturdav morning, Septem- 
ber 26th. that he (Wilson) had been out on a 
jov ride "yesterday." Fridav. Seotember 25th. 

That on or about the 25th of August, I met 
Mr. Francis at thp Palace Hotel in San Fran- 
cisco; that T complained to hiin about the treat- 
ment T received in Stockton, and he asked me 
in what wav; that I told him that the Stockton 
neople had not treated me right; that Mr. 
Francis then said. "Whv did you not beat up 
those two union electricians that night?" Th-n 
T toM him the Merchants'. Manufacturers and 
Employers had a man on the iob unknown to 
me furnishing information: that there were 
rieoi)le at the denot watching us; that Mr. 
Vr-.nris Ihen said. "Whv did you not get them 
alP" 

Tlvt Mr. Bailev was sent from Portland bv 
Afi-. Fi""'ris to Stockton, and that he is a mem- 
1)ers of ihe firm of Bailev & Torrey. on Second 
stre'-i. Portland' th^it Mr. Brokaw came to 
Sto'-kto'i from San Francisco. 

That I am makiner this, affidavit of my own 
free n'iH. "ithout consideration, promise of nav 
or nnv other remuneration; and further affiant 

saith not. _ 

HANS T.E JEUNE. 

Snbscrih.Tl and <;worn <c) before me this tvvcn- 
<v-ei-'ht'i dav of September, in the vear of our 
T.ord' 1014. 

Wn.l.IAM B. BT'SH. 
Notar>' Pnblic in and for the Cit'- and Conn'.' 

of San T'rancisco, State of California. 



LA5u«':i aoNunic PLAiroKn. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Womc-^^n Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMCM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 6.) 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

.s.\X FR.ANCI.SCO, Cat, 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SK.\TTT,E. Wash., HOSVo Western Ave., P. O. Box 
873. 

PORTT.ANn. Ore., ini N. Front St. 

S.\N PEDRO. Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS" ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
S.AX FRANCISCO, Cat., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash.. Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
noek. P. O. Box USa. 

POR'I'T.AND. Ore.. New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110. Third and Flanders Sts. 

SA.N PEDRO. Cal., P O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
S.W I-RA.NriSro, Cil., 4fl Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., S4 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORL\. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

C;in hp procured by seamen at 
.nny of the above-mentioned places; 
,'il.so at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



L 


ab 


or 


N 


ews. 


II 



The New York State Commission 
on Workmen's Compensation granted 
to George Jones $11 a week for 
life. He was working for a gas 
company and was so injured that a 
hand and foot had to be amputated. 
Previously he had lost an arm. 

A 5 per cent, increase for tele- 
graphers along the lines of the 
Southern Pacific system is an- 
nounced, after a controversy that has 
lasted almost a year. .'\t one time a 
strike vote declared in favor of ceas- 
ing work between New Orleans and 
Portland, Ore., but continued con- 
ferences finally resulted in a satis- 
factory adjustment. 

Immigrant arrivals at Philadelphia 
fur the three months ended .\ugust 
31 show heavy decreases when com- 
pared with the corresponding three 
months of last year. .According to 
figures furnished by Immigrant Com- 
missioner Greenwalt, only 927 aliens 
came into this country by way of 
Philadelphia, as against 24,079 during 
June, July, and .\ugust of last year. 
Tlie war is responsible for this tem- 
porary condition. Observers declare 
that all immigration records will be 
broken when European hostilities 
cease. 

Journeymen Tailors' Union No. 39ff 
of New York is conducting an agi- 
tation for the abolishment of home 
work, the establishment of an eight- 
hour day and higher wages, as fol- 
lows: Minimum of $27 a week for 
first-class and $24 a week for second- 
class tailors; $24 and $22 for bushel- 
men, and $19, $17, and $15 for help- 
ers who are to be employed and 
paid directly by the employers; extra 
time for overtime. The union also 
demands sanitary conditions in the 
workshops. Meetings are being held 
for the prpose of strengthening the 
organization before these demands 
are submitted to employers. 

The scope of the Government's big 
clearing-house for laborers and home- 
seekers has been extended by the es- 
talilishmcnt throughout the country 
of distributing zones with head- 
(|uarters in eighteen cities. Informa- 
tion relating to the needs of em- 
ployers, the supply of workers, and 
opportunities for settlers will be ex- 
changed among the headquarters 
under direction of a division of 
information in the Department of 
Labor. More speedy distribution of 
labor will be accomplished under 
the system, officials believe, and give 
impetus to the movement to aid 
dwellers in crowded centers to find 
places of greater opportunity in the 
country. 

Machinists of Boston have signed 
a year's agreement with the United 
Metal Seal Company which provides 
for an eight-hour day and a minimum 
wage rate of $3.50. Overtime shall 
be paid for at the rate of time and 
one-half. Sunday work shall be 
double time, and outside work at 
the rate of $4 a day. Apprentices 
will not be less than sixteen years 
and not over twenty-one years of age 
at the beginning of their appren- 
ticeship term. They shall serve four 
years and be employed at day work 
only. None but members of the In- 
ternational Association of Machinists 
shall be employed, and a representa- 
tive of the association shall be per- 
mitted at all times to enter the shop 
and examine the books of its mem- 
bers. A thirty days' notice is neces- 
sary for either party to change or 
cancel the agreement. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 

DAY AND NIGHT 



PIER NO 1. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 



615-617 First Ave. 

SEATTLE, 



Opp. Totem Pole 
WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE. Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Bernor 



A. -1821 
Ragnvald 

J. 
Andrew 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the S.-iilors' XJnion Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to 
call or have their mail forwarded during 
that period, they should notify the Agent 
to hold mail until arrival. 



Matson, Eric 
McPherson, Robert 
Mikkelsen. K. -1620 
Moen. Robert 
Monson, Martin 
Muir, James 
Muins. F. W. D. 
Muller, Willie 
Maas, R. 
Mar.\. Rhorvald 
McDonald. Wm. 
Manson, Sven 
Nelson. Bernt 
Nielsen, H. J. 
Ness. TjOiiis 
Ness. Carl 
Nielsen. P. L. 
Nashis. P. 
Norlin, Geo. 
Orstad. Christ 
Osterman, Oscar 
Olsen, B. -S37 
Olson, C. -S84 
Olsen. A. M. 
Olsen. Martin 
Olsen. O. P. -1141 
Paaso, A. 
Petterson. Harry 
Petersen, .Tohn 
Petersen. OUif B. 
Peterson, Victor 
Primrose. H. L. 
Ouisley. R. E. 
Rasmusspn. Rasmus 
Rasmussen, K. R. 
Rasmnssen. Olai 
Rohme, Otto 
Rnhde. Fritz 
Rose. W. H. 
Ramuelson, Hugo 
Shepard. Peter 
Rimminghjem. G. 
Saunders. R. 
Rtover. Harry 
Rtuhr. H. 
Rimdherg. K K. 
Rvensen, Ted 
Ramuelsen Harnld 
■ Rmith. Talne 
Roderherg. A. 
Staff. C. 
Rtrand. C. 
Rtraiiss. P 
Talhom. .1. 
Thorsen. Toneer 
Thorsen. Johnnnrs 
Thompson. Willie 
TotZ. R. 
Tahlinen. M. 
Tahti. Hialmar 
Tomis. F'-ank 
V.aldlev. P. 
■WenikUe, A. 
W^ee. W. 
"W^eller. T. J. 
Wilkhelm. E. 
W^ickstrom. A "ton 
Zimmerman. Thos. 



Abrahamosn 
Allen, John 
Alonzo. J. 
Anderson, 
Andersen. 
.\ylward. 
Alfredsen, 
Albers, Geo. 
Anderson, Julius ] 
Renter, Henry 
Bruce, Robert 
Bode, Fred 
Bye, Sigurd 
Backman, F. J. 
Bahr, 'Walter 
Brodie, W. G. 
Carlson, J. -861 
Campbell, Frank 
Daly. W. O. 
Dekk:er, O. 
Die Christ O. 
D. M. 

Davis. F. A. 
Doddy. C. W. 
Rngstrom, Carl 
P^ngstrom, Carl 
Eriksen, C. 
Erikson, Erik 
Eriksen. .Tohn 
Fenes, Ing\'ald 
Foss, A. F. 
Frammis, Ivar 
Gardner, .Tames 
Gundersen, D. 
Geiger, .Toe 
Graae. P. C. 
Harklin. C. B. 
Hagstrom, Victor 
Harster. Otto 
Halversen. Hans 
Hansen. Nils -2072 
Helstrom, .T. A. 
Hansen. Henry 
Tlellisen. H. 
Herman. Axel 
Hager. P. B. 
.Tohnson. Julius 
.Tohansen. Arvid 
Johanrsen. Geo. 
.Tafolisen, .Tohan 
.T.'H'obsen. Oscar 
Johnsfn, Ernest 
.Tohanson, Knut 
Johnson. Jacob 
Jorgensen. Agge 
Kallio. F. 
Krouss. Ernest 
Kristiansen. Trygve 
Kruger. .T. 
T,arsen. Hans -1595 
T^iuns-strom Steen 
Luwold. Nils 
T amh Herbert 
T.,of. Oscar 
T.nrentsen. .Tohn 
T,oo. E Van 
T.undgren. Carl 
T.ntten, T. 
Markman, H. 



W 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni, 
who has important news from home. 
-Address, Mrs. Minni Hall. Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Walter Jorgeson Clang, born in 
Aaland Yetta, Ostro Yetta, is in- 
quired for by his uncle, John Clang. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS. HATS AND SHOES 
At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

( 220-222 1 

Two Stores) 103-105-107 P** ^^6- So. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



EureKa, CaL 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium in 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash, 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Next door to Master Mates and Pilots 

Conducted by CAPT. H. S. SMITH, 

Who for four years was Assist. Ins. of 

Steamboats in Seattle 

Tacotna Letter List. 



Anderson, John 
Almkvlst, Emil 
Corty, Casar 
Dobbin, Harry 
Doering, E. W. 
Englund, Gust E. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Iversen, Iver 
Johansson, Charles 
Johannsen, Christian 
Karthauser, Otto 
Linea, W. 



I..ine, Wiktor 
Melgail, M. 
Murphy, Daniel 
Nilsson, Teodor 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Paterson, John 
Pettersson, C. H. 
Voss, H, 

Whermann, William 
Wilbrandt, Harry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuana" in September, 
1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Littra B. Nystrama St., Goteborg, 
Sweden. — 5-13-14. 

Carl Julius Carkon, born in Swe- 
den in 1877, is inquired for by his 
mother. There is about $2000 due 
him from his father's estate. Last 
lieard of in September, 1902, on the 
Atlantic Coast. Previously sailed on 
the "Clifford" between St. Johns and 
New York. Address Fru Sophia 
Carlson, Klubbegard, Hallands Lan, 
Heberg, Sweden. 

Samuel Dickson, a seaman, aged 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to cominunicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Oscar Osolin, John Lind, M. 
Elone, John Anderson, Thomas Puk- 
ki, Alex. Tuominen, Chas. Grouberg, 
who were on board the steamer "Fi- 
fild" April 7. 1913, please communi- 
cate with the Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

Willy Blunel, a native of Germany, 
is inquired for by his uncle. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify W. Stieglitz, Central Hotel, 
Hoboken, N. J.— 9-30-14. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL, 



Herman Schulze 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eu eka, Cal., Letter List 



Ereksen, Anton 
Ellison, Sam 
Englund, Gust 
Hansen, Harald 
Hansen, Harry 
-1827 (Photo) 



Haldorsen, Adolf 
Ingebrethsen, Alfred 
Lawrence, Harry 
Lomas, Richard 
Thorssen, Fred'k. N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Andrew Wilne, native of Dundee, 
Scotland; about 28 years of age, dark 
complexion, last heard of about nine 
years ago, sailing as steward, also 
as fireman, is inquired for by his 
relatives. Address A. S. Milne, 1122 
Rose street, Grandview, Vancouver, 
B. C. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914. 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson & 
Co, at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderharm, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



Portland, Ore. 

wmTjohnson 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 
FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Tovjfnsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, A. -164B 
Anderson, Gust. 

-1808 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Andersen, Mike 
Bergman, Karl W. 
Berglund, Ed. 
Bjorkman, Clias. 
Brun, Mathias 
Bults, Ernest 
Bakkersen, Peter J. 
Carlsen, J. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Carlson, C. Erland 
Campbell, Frank 
Dahl, Henry 
Deswert, William 
Day, Aca 
Danielsen, Nils J. 
Edstrom, John 
Erman, A. 
Bkham, Frana 
England, B. 
Freitag, Franz 
Fristrom, S. 
Geiger, Josef 
Gordia, Piet 
Uynther, John 
Gravier, Eugene 
Greil, Ben 
Hansen, Max O. 
Henriksson, William 
Hellman, Albin 
Henricks, Woldemar 
Hedlund, Albert 
Holm, Aage 
Huneig, Hans 
Hansen, H. F. C. C. 
Johansen, Chris 
Jansson, L. -2166 
Johansson, Arvo 
Jacobson, A. 



Karlson, August 
Kluge, Frank 
Kelly, Patric 
L,aine, Frank 
L/arsun, John 
Dewik, Karl 
l^ulzen, Wald. 
Matlison, Nils 
Malhiassen, Sigurd 
Maass, H. 
Meckerman, Ernest 
Marx, Tiiorwald 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Moberg, Karl 
Nelssen, C. J. 
Nilsson, Axel 
Nielsen, Knslian 
Narberg, Jolin 
Olsen, Arthur 
Olsen, Ansgar 
Olson, J. \V. 
Olsen, John Andreas 
Pliillip, Max 
Pelterson, Einar 
Peterson, Hans 
Petersson, M. 
Pettersson, VV. H. 
Pelz, Gottfried 
Poliland, Max 
i'etersen, John 
Rautio, Jacob 
Reincke, Herman 
Rhodes, F. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Simens, O. Li. 
Scott, James 
Schulz, Alfred 
Wieprecht, Ernest 
Welsen, J. 
Waller, John 
Woldhouse, Jolin 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. ■ 




CJISTERt^ 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, -1118 

Arnell, John 

Behn, Alfred 

Bowen, J. J. 

Butler, J. E. 

Bergman, L,. J. 

Christensen, Albert 

Carlstrom, John 

Debus, F. 

de Lange, Ingolf 

Doyle, W. 

Ernandes, Frisco 

Eriksson, -333 

Evensen, Krist 

Forde, S. C. 

Graf, Otto 

Gronros, Oswald 

Hansen, Ove Max 

Husche, H'y 

Ingebretsen, J. A. 

Jacobson, Arthur 

Johansen, Hans 

Johansen, A. H. 

Jeutaft, Sigurd 

Kallas, Alek 

Kristiansen, -1093 

Koski, Chas. 

Kustel, V. J. 

Loining, Hermand 
_Dengtssen, Gottfried 
"Lorsin, G. L. 

Darsen, Hans 

McLean, H. 

Martin, James 

Mackenzie, Hector 
G. 



Munsen, Fred 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nilsen, Alf. W. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsen, Oswald -1059 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olasen, Chas. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Pettersen, Olaf 
Peterson, Nels 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Roberts, I. 
Sim, Gunder 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Sormato, Matti 
Strom, C. 
Schultz 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Vilen, T. 
Walder, Olsen N. 
Zebe, G. V. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Solberg, Peter 
Stanners, W. S. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, age about 44, is en- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
^'rancisco, Cal. 7-22-14 



fiUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS. SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings 



Headquarters for 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 
401 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

420(2 E- Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS. 



LEADING JEWELERS 

Have Moved to 

318 E. HERON STREET 

Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

A BERDEEN ,,,:,^,: WASHINGTON 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOVV, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $L50 up 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News S Drug Co. 

Headquarters 
SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. WISKAH STREET, ABERDEEN 
SMOKE 

ThinK of Me" and 
"White Squadron" 

CIGARS 

Made by 
L. L. MALEY, Aberdeen, Wash. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 
1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 

served as an apprentice in a British 

, ship, age about 21 years, medium 

,'heiglit, brown hair, last heard of in 

I San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 

anxiously inquired for by his father. 

Please notify British Consul-General 

at San Francisco. 

I George Alfred Hall, last heard of 

on tlie Sell. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
I . ... 

I ,. .11 --i_oep communiacte with his 

brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, 
last heard of at Melbourne, \ustralia, 
is inquired for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda. Cal. 



Home News. 





Xew York City has borrowed 
$100,166,617 in gold to pay off a 
foreign iiulchtedness of $80,000,000 
and other debts. 

By unanimous vote the House of 
Representatives bestowed the thank.-, 
of Congress upon Col. George W. 
(jnethals and those associated witii 
him in building the Panama Canal. 
Tile bill also makes Col. Goethals, 
who is Governor of the Canal Zone, 
a major-general. Tlie same bill 
would make Co!. William C. Gorgas, 
now a surgeon-general, a major 
general of the medical corps. 

By order of President Wilson as 
commander-in-chief of the Army and 
Navy, the wireless station of the 
Marconi Company at Siasconset, 
Mass., was closed on September 25. 
because it declined to recognize the 
right of the Federal Government to 
exercise a censorship over the plant. 
'i"he Navy Department took no cog- 
nizance of the fact lliat the Marconi 
Company had filed in a Federal 
Court an application for an injunc- 
tion to restrain the naval officers 
from closing or censoring the sta- 
tion. The wireless company finally 
decided to offer no resistance and 
the station was closed at 1 p. m. 
It is reported semi-officially from 
Washington that a fleet of seven 
square-rigged vessels' owned in Bos- 
ton but now sailing under the Brit- 
ish flag, is seeking to be admitted to 
American registry. The vessels com- 
prising this fleet, said to be one of 
the finest of the olden type now on 
the high seas are: The "Avon," 578 
tons; the "Brynhilda," 1502 tons; the 
"Pass of Balmaha," 1571 tons; the 
"Rhine," 1690 tons; the "Timandra," 
1579 tons; the "Gael," 1630 tons, and 
the "Snowden," 1112 tons. They are 
of steel construction and are now 
employed in carrying lumber from 
north Atlantic to South American 
ports and in bringing back cargoes 
principally of hides. 

With the recent action of the In- 
ternational Association of Bridge 
and Structural Iron Workers, the 
plan for a great central bank that 
has been discussed in labor circles 
for a year or more appears to be 
fairly on the road to complete real- 
ization. The iron workers, in con- 
\ention, adopted resolutions ap- 
proving a central labor bank in 
Indianapolis, and authorized the ap- 
pointment of a committee to confer 
with oilier labor organizations for 
working out the details of organiza- 
tion. Twenty-seven great interna- 
tional unions have headquarters in 
Indianapolis, and the deposits in the 
banks of thai city run into the mil- 
lions. 

The Postoffice Department has is- 
sued a special circular in whicii the 
iniblic is informed that the prompt 
payment of European money orders 
i-aiinot be guaranteed. It sets forth 
that the mobilization and movement 
of armies in the war in P'.iirope is 
seriously interfering with the usual 
methods of conimuuication and 
transportation, and that "until the 
restoration of peace and normal 
conditions persons who apply for 
international money orders payable 
ill any European country should be 
informed that the Postofiice Depart- 
ment cannot insure the correct or 
speedy payment thereof." Such 
business, it continues, "is accepted 
subject to the delays and risks inci- 
dent to the state of war now ex- 
isting." 



14 



COAST SEAiMEX'S JOURNAL. 




Thi; use of tlic Blue Ensign bj' 
l'>iitish merchant vessels ha.s been 
prohibited from August 24, ;md no 
vessel is now allowed to fly the 
TJlue Ensign except under special 
.\dniiralty warrant issued suhsc- 
(|uently to August 24. 

The Duke of Abruzzi has In-en 
made commander-in-chief of the 
Italian Navy. The Duke, who was 
born in Madrid in 1873, was for- 
merly a captain in the Italian Navy, 
and in 1900 took part in an e.xpedi- 
tion to the North Pole, penetrating 
nearer to the Pole than had previ- 
ously been done at that time. 

The British freighter '"Eloriston," 
grain laden, from Montreal to Lon- 
don, which struck an iceberg in the 
Straits of Belle Isle and was beached 
on the Newfoundland coast, is report- 
ed at safe anchorage in Port Saun- 
ders, having been floated subse- 
(|uently. The steamer will probably 
be brought to either Quebec or Hali- 
fax for repairs. 

The White Star-Dominion Line an- 
nounces that it will receive for 
third-class passage to Liverpool 
only, any nationality with the excep- 
tion of .\ustrians, Germans and 
Hungarians. In the case of Rus- 
sians and Finlanders, however, the 
passengers are required to have $35 
in their possession to pay for for- 
warding from Liverpool. 

The French Government has given 
notice lliat the use of wireless tele- 
graphy on merchant vessels is pro- 
hibited in French ports and terri- 
torial waters, and the antennae of 
tile apparatus must l)e dismantled, 
h'oreign transports may be ex- 
cepted from this requirement by spe- 
cial license issued by the naval au- 
thorities. 

During the liscal year ended 
March 31. 1914, there was a notable 
increase in shipping at the ports of 
the Bahama Islands. The total 
clearances of steam vessels was 
807,237 tons, which show's a gain of 
nearly one-third as compared with 
605,706 of the preceding year; sail- 
ing craft, 15,256, or about one-sixth 
less than 18,609, of 1913. 

It is reported that Philippine 
waters are being constantly patrolled 
by British, French, Russian and 
Japanese warships to intercept Ger- 
man merchantmen. The "Hamp- 
shire" is west of Luzon, a Russian 
cruiscM- with seven destroyers is pa- 
trolling tf) the north, while the 
I'Vench armored cruisers "Kleber" 
and "Dupleix" are to the southward. 

Sir Courtenay Bennett, the British 
Consul-General at New York, an- 
nounced that the steamer "Lorenzo," 
registered as a United States 
merchantman, and the Norwegian 
steamer "Thor" had been captured 
by a British cruiser in the act of 
coaling the (jerman cruiser "Karls- 
ruhe" at sea and had been taken to 
St. Lucia to awail the disposition by 
a prize court. 

.\ brisk demand for the product 
of the paper and pulp mills in the 
interior of Newfoundland has result- 
ed from the conditions growing out 
of the war in Europe. Steamers are 
rapidly arriving at St. John's to take 
on board cargoes for England. It 
is expected that the mills will be 
(jbliged to supplement their present 
et|uipment. and it is anticipated that 
new pulp and paper concerns will 
shortly be in operation. The de- 
mand is due chiefly to the increased 
needs of the newspapers in London 
and other Berlin cities. 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

52 EAST STREET, Opp. Ferry Depot, San Francisco 
JOE WEISS Telephone Kc 

Union Made Shoes 

l-OR MEN EXCLUSIVELY 

NEW STORE! NEW GOODS! 

NEW MACHINERY! 

Call and Inspect our new up-to-date quarters 

Repairing done while you wait by the latest machinery 

Work called for and delivered 

W'e use only the best leather market aflfords 

We can save you money by purchasing your next pair 




of shoes from us. 
Phone Douglas 198 UNION LABEL USED 

NOVELTY TAILORING CO. 

Third Floor Phelan Building 
760 MARKET STREET 



WORKSHOP CUTTING DEPT. SALES DEPT. 

Room 325 Room 327 Room 329 

Represented by F. SELANDER, Assistant Secretary 




San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Franclsoo Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
montlis only and will be returned to the 
Post OfRce at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these eolumns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aaltos. W. O. -1780 

Abboos, Arne 

Abolin. Chris. 

Abraiiamsen. Anton 
' Adolfsson, F. H. 

Ahl, Theo 

Alilstrom. Elis 

Albertson, Chris 

Alexander, James 
I Allen. James 

Amundsen, Albert 

Ander.sen, A. 

Andersen. Henry 

Andersen, Nela 

Andersen, Peter 
I Baars, Hans 

Backman, Paul 
I Bauer. Andrew 

Beck Johannes 
I Behr. H. 
' Beimeir. Peter 

Bensen. D. 

Benson. Gus 

Benson, Severin 

Berg, John 
• Berghalm. Edward 

Bertelsen, Alf. 

Binder, Heibert 

Bjorklund. Eric 

Bjornsen, Conrad 

BjorkFtrom. Arthur 

Bjorseth. Knut 
I Blanco, D. 

Callon. Josh. 

Campbell, D. C. 
I Campbell. Geo. 
I Carlera. Pete 

Carlson. A. A. 

Carlson. Charley 

Carlson. H. 

Carlson. John 

Carlson, P. S. 

Carlstrom. John 
I Carry. Potpr A. 

Carter. Sidney 

Christensen. Albert 

Christensen. Fred R. 

Dahlin. O. W. 
'Dalen. Wm. K. 

Daubbs. Paul 
I Davis. Frank A. 
I Davis. Gala 

De Brun, B. 

Debus. Fredrick 
I Ues Hayes. F. 

Deswerl. William 

Eaton. William H. 
I Eby. Ivar. D. 
I Rckhoff, Otto 
I Egsers. John 

Ehlert, Ernest 
'i Kinardt. John 

Elenlus. A. 

Ellis, E. 
I Ellsworth, James 
I P^arnen, M. S. 

Fi(>dler, Emll 

Fillhol. F. 
I Finn. Chas. 
I Fischer. Wilhelm, 
I -707 

(Jabv. Jim 

Gasch. William 

Geary. Albert 

Gilholm. Albin 

Giortz, Petrus V. 

Gjar.s. Petrus 

Gjasdal. Elling 

Gordon. Geo. 

Granstrom. Nestar 
I Haave, Norvald 
I Hasrgar. Fred 

Hall. S. C. 

Hallen. Victor 
I Halvarsen. H. 

Halvorson. Olaf 

Hammargren. Oscar 
, Hank. A. K. 

Hansen, Bernhard 
t Hansen. C. T. 

Kansen. H. P. 

Hansen, .Teremias 

Hansen. Jerry 
I Hansen. J. -2lRfi 

Hansen, Marius 



Anderson, E. -17S1 
Anderson. Kdvard 
Anderson, Emanuel 
Anderson. F. 
Anderson. Johannes 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson. S. M. 
Andersseii. H. -1477 
.Vnderssen. S. 1'. 
Andreassen, Morgan 
Antonsen. Herman 
-Arntsen. John 
Attel. Alf 
Austin, Tom 
Blanert, Willy 
Blueker. John 
Boers, M. 
Bohn, Franz 
Borgen. John 
Boro, Severin S. 
Bowman. William G 
Boy, Geo. 
Brander, William 
Brennet, Waldemar 
Bryan, John 
Brynjulfson. Halvar 
Burndez. Charles 
Buse. D. 
Bye. Sigurd 
Byglin. O. O. 
Bynum. Joe 

Christiansen, I... P. 
Christiansen, Peder 
Cherniawski. M. 
Classen. Henry 
Clausen. Chr. 
Coakley, John 
Cockell, Rrank 
Connolly, Stephen 
Contreras, Julius 
Cordia, P. 
Costa. Casimlro 
Cord. P. 
Crosman, Geo. 

Digman, Carl A. 
Hixon, John 
Douglas, George 
Dowda, C. W. 
Dowc. John 
Drenkhahn. M. 
Dreyer. Carl 
Duval, Bennett 
Durhalt. Harry 
Rlofson, John 
Elone. Emanufil 
Eriksen. Bernhard 
Erikson, E. 
Krikson. G. 
Rrvin. Arthur H. 
Eskildsen. T.ars B. 
Kskildsen. Nils P. 
Even sen, M. 
Fitzpatrirk. P. 
Folvik. Lewis 
Fraser. Thomas 
French. Jack 
Kurth. Ri -1W 



Gravit, Carl 
Griffin. Jas. 
Grlgoleit. Ed. 
Gronnevick. Isark 
Gulbranson. Bjorn 
Gundersen. Chas. 
Gustafson. Gus 
Gustavsen. Olaf 
Gutman. Charles 
H;insen, Xicolai 
Hansen. Olaf 
Hansen. Oscar 
Hansen. Thomas 
Hansen. AV. H. C. 
Hanson. Charles G. 
Ha r tog. John 
Haskins. C. 
Haws. Arthur 
Hawkens. Fred 
Heekel, Max 
Heldal. Tryg%-e 
Helpap. August 
Henriekson, Chas. 
Henry. H. A. 



Gust; 



Martin 



Jolin 
Martin 



Hensen. J. 
Hermansson, 
Hewitt. PetO! 
Higgins. H. 
Hiks, Gustav 
Hilke. Karl 
Hoffman 
Hogan. A. 
Hogelund. Andrew 
Hollman. 
Ikivalko 
Illig. Gus 
Jacohsen. 

Jaeobsen. ... 

Jamlsch. Ed W. 
.Jensen. Fredrick 
Jensen, lialvor 
Jensen. C. 
Jensen. Hans 
Jensen, Harry 
.lensen. Just 
Jensen. William 
Jersch, Wilhelm 
Johannesen. Einar 
Johansen, Alf. 
Johansen. Eduard 
Johansen. Bernard 
Johansen, Einar M. 
Johansen, Johan 
Johansen, S. W. 
Johansen. Thos. W 
Kaasik, August 
Kaktin, Ed 
Kalkin, Fred 
Kallio, Frans 
Kallos. Alex. 
Kalnin. E. 
Kargen. Fred 
Karlsen, Martin 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Kavser, C. T. 
Keating. R. 
Kelly, Edward 
Lacy, Thos. E. 
Lala. August 
Lapschies, Edward 
Larsen, Alf 
Larsen, Anton 
l.arsen. Genrg L. 
I^arsen, Hans 
Larsen, T. 
Larson, C. 
I^arson. H. P 
Larsson, K. E. 
Laws. Harry 
Lee. Ernest 

Macrae, Alexander 
Malmstrom, C. A. 
Maltfi I 
Mansfield. Jack 
Markley, Paul 
Markman. Harry 
Markmann, Heinrifl 
Martenz. Paul -226 
Martens. Paul 
Masters. C. 
Martensen. I. C.-21S11 
Marthwarz. Carl 
Mathisen. Christian 
Matsen. H. 
Matson. O. -20415 
Mayes. J. B 
MoConnell. David 
McCort. Joe 
McKeating, R. 
McMahon, J. T. 
Nagel, Alf 
Nar. P. Niels 
Nelsen. Ernest C. 
Nelsen, Fred 
Nelsen, Victor 
Nelson. C. 
Nelson. AV. 
Neumann. J. 
Newbert. Herman 
Nicholson. F. E. 
Oberg. C. W. 
Oberg. Mauris 
O'Connor. W. F. 
Olmann. P. 
Onu, Tobias 
Olsen. Alfred 
Olsen. Ferdinand 
Olsen. Gus 
Olsen. Olai 
Olsen. O. -1283 
Olsen. Otto 
Olsen. Oswald 

Peter 

William 

Geo. W. 

A. 
P 



Olsen 

Olsen. 

Olson, 

Palm. 

Palmer, 

Parrell, William 

Pnulsen. Alex. 

Paultln. Martin 

Pearson. Victor 

Pedersen, Carl 

Pedersen, Elllf 

Pedersen. Hans 

Pedersen, Paul 



Holmstrom. Oscar 
fHolm, S. 
Hoist, R. 
Holtberg. Ernest 
Hovring. H. J. 
Hultberg, Ernest 
Hubner. C. F. W. 
Huse. Eduard 
Hyde, Carl 

Isakson, Karl 

Johanson, Edwin 
Johanson. Nathanael 
Johanssen. Emil 
Johnsen. Ole 
Johnsen, G. -950 
Johnsen, Jakob 
Johnson. A. R. 
Johnson. D. 
.Tohnson. E 
.Tolmson. Einar 
Johnson. F. 
Johnson, Gus 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson. Pete 
Johnson. Robert 
Johnson. Steve 
Johnston, W. 
Jokstad. Sigurd O. 
Jones, Berthon 
Keshcr, K. 
Kindlund. Otto 
Kine. Conrad 
Klebingat. Fred 
Klette. Ernst 
Kohne. Ernst 
Kolberg, Arvid 
Konopacki, Martin 
Kristlansen. L. P. 
Kroeger. Henry 
Krutman. K. 
Kuhn, John 
Leckscher, Henry 

-1684 
Lewis. Roy B. 
TJdsten, Chas. 
Lindelop. Charles 
Lindner, J. -1750 
Lindgren, Richard 
Line, W. 
Llnhquist, G. 
Lohne. E. 
Lundblad, Ernst 
Lund. Pete 

McMalo. Victor 

Mechan, Frank 

Meriult, Gaston 

Mever. W. 

Miller, Christ 

Miller. Herman 
1 Moberg. A. W. 
2Mogelberg. Harry 

Mohr, Ernst 

Monsen, Martin 

Moore, C. C 

Moren. E. H. 

Morris. Benjamin 

Morrison, Wm. 

Moure. Peter 

Mueller. A. R. 

Mudda. A. 

Muireheek, W. 

Muller. Fred 

Murray. C. P. 

Nielsen. Ingolf 

Nielsen, L. 

Nielsen, N. C. 

Nllson. Ragnard 

Nilsson, Johan -!137 

Nilsson. -1141 

Nurken. Tf. 

Nurml. Victor R. 

Nyman. A. 

Nyman. Oskar 

Olson, .Tames 

Olson. Machial 

Olson. M. 

Olson. Marius 

Olson. S. 

Olson. Sam 

Olsson, C. G. -lini 

Olsson. G. B. 

Ondrasek. Ralph 

O'Nell. James 

Osalin, Oscar 

Osman. T. B. 

Osterhoff. Heinrieh 

Ottem. Aksel 

Ovarnstrom. H. 

Pedersen, O. -1392 

Pedersen, Petter A. 

Pedersen. Walter G. 

Pederson, Sofus R. 

Pera. Gust 

Peters. J. 

Petersen. -1664 

Petersen. .Tohn A. 

Petersen. Olav -1595 

Petersen, S. A. 



Peterson, Oscar -1558 
I'eterson. Soren 
Petersson, A. -1436 
Petersson, Chas. 

-1901 
Pettersen, F. -1520 
Pettersson. Adolf 

-1622 
Raalsen. Fred 
Ramberg-. B. A. 
Kasniussen. Andrew 
Raymond. Frank L. 
Keed, J. AV. 
iiegan, John 
Ueine. G. 
Kepsun, Ed. 
Richardson. E. O. 
Rlchter, Niels 
Saaiinen, Werner 
Saderlund, Uno 
Sager. Ed. 
Salger. Julius 
Salvesen. S. 
Sancherd. AMncent 
Sandblom. K. 
Sandstrom. Ivar 
Sandstrom. O. H . 
Sanlos. Ben 
Scheffler. Samuel 
S.-lunell. F. A. 
Schmidt. Berhard 
Schroder. E. A\'. 
Schultz, F. J. 
Scliulz, Robert 
Schulze. Paul 
Scott. Emll 
Seidel. Willi 
Seiffert. Johannes 
Sballgreen. John 
Shem. A. 
Sherry, J. H. 
!Sliield.«. J J. 
Simonds, J. 
.Skoglund, Harry 
Slenning, Joseph 
Tamanen, Erland 
'lamman. Krlspin 
Tasnase. E. 
Taucer. Chas. 
Thearin. John E. 
Tho. Johan 
Thomas, Edward 
Udekull, C. 
Uhlman, Axel 
A'anderberg, Geo. 
A'angelder, AVilliam 
A^an Katwijk. J. W. 
Velson. Frank 
\A'acTier. W. 
WaUlhouse, John 
Wallgren, X. M. 
Walsh. B. 
Wanderlid, J. 
Welson, R. 
AVelure, J. 
Westgaard, John 
Westman. A. 
AVhite. Fred 
Wiback. Walter 



I-*ettersen. Karl 
Petz. FriU 
Pewhiand, M. 
Pillson. Eduard 
Porath, Ben 
Prannels. W. 
Prinz. Carl 
Punis. Antony 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Roberts. John 
Hobinsboom. E. 
Rosenblad, Axel 
Rosendahl. Knud 
Kosenquist, A. 
Ruise. — 
Rundquist. O. 
Rutte. Peter 
Ryersen, Geo. 
Smalmberg, Otto 
Smith, D. 
Smitli, Percy S. 
Snell. Adolf 
Sollt. J. 

Sonnenberg. J. C. 
Sorby, Olaf 
Sorensen. C. J. T. G. 
Sorensen. James 
Sorensen. Peter 
Speller. H. z 

Spf>onei-. Emil 
Stallbaum. Eberhard 
Stein. Emil 
Stenberg. Alfred 
Strasdin. Hans 
Strauss, Walter 
Strom. Kahl 
Swansen, O. 
Swanson. Jack 
Swanson. John 
Swansson. Oskar 
Swartley. Norman 
Sundi, Oscar 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundharm, Fred 

Thompson, E. 
Thompson. Thomas 
Thoren. Gus 
Ticksman. Chas. 
ToUefsen. Hans 
Tommala. A'alno 
Tuchel. Gustav 
Ulmar, John 

A'erfard. Frank 
A'esgaard. Jens 
A'eeg. I^ank 
A'^oorhies, Firman 
Wilhelm, Ewald 
Willarts, Fred 
Willert. Charles 
AVilliams. John 
Wilsen. Billy 
Wimmer. Geo. 
Winter. Harry 
AVirta. John 
AVittenborn. Hans 
Wortman, Wm. 



Zankert. Karl 
Zornlg, Harry 



Zwakten. I^udolph 



PACKAGES. 
Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
nf the Pacific. 



Anderson. A. 
.Anderson. Andrew 
Anderson. Axel 
Athanasele, Demetre 
Beling. Oscar 
Carter. H. 
Ceelan. John 
Christoffersen. Olaf 
Rllefsen. Otto 
Erikson, E. 
Finnolly, Wm. 
Hansen. Karl 
Hansen. Marius 
Hendriksen, Hag- 

bart 
Heningway. George 
Hill. John 
Hoffman. J. 
Iversen, Tver 
Johansen, Emll 
Johnson. R. W. 
Jorgensen. Oluv 
TClette. E. F. 
Knappe. Ad. 



Laas. J. 
Laydon. D. 
Lundberg, Oskar 
Mchrtens. H. K. 
Miles. I. P. 
Olsen. Arne 
Olsen. Carl -1101 
Olsen. Marlnus 
Olsen. W. S. -1229 
Raasch. O. 
Rarly, Frans. 
Rasmussen. Enii' 
Rathke. Relnhold 
Relursen. A. L. 
Roslin. Robert 
Ruter, Peter 
Schroder, Aug. 
Sorensen, Pete 
Summers. J. J. 
Thorsen. Jens 
Wakely. R. E. 
Walters. Albert B. 
Wurthman. W. 1.. 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 



49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

.\pply to I. N. IIYLEN, 49 Clay St. 

TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET, near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCI>USIA-E UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

\V. Kahlberg. No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Joui-nal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT -LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 
Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. B. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Halght and Belvedere street. 

June 30, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent , Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,86S.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

For the six months ending June 30, 
1914, a dividend to depositors of 4% per 
annum was declared. 

Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Mercliant and Wasliington 



HOTEL EVAN* 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Telephone Kearny 1B34 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOIVtE INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 

Phone Garfield 7833 E. Benvenuti, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: .25, .30 
and .50 per day. $1.25 per Week and 
up. Special rates for Housekeeping, 

Single or Connecting Rooms. 
This Place Must Be Seen to Be Appre- 
ciated. Nothing Like It in the City. 

1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



See that this Label is S,^," 
on the Keg or Bottle ^''' 



When Drinking Beer ^^^r^^ 



7(le 

AND 

Porter 



c^><ia^ Of America rXc^h^ 

COPTBIGHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 




JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

M. WICKS 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

60 STEUART STREET 

San Francisco 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 

DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at IVIarket, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 5390 

ANCHOR HOUSE 



S. PETERSON, Prop. 



495 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

J. MILLER 
Seamen's Outfitter 
Union Made Goods 

General Merchandise 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"EL GRISTOFOliO" 

Clear Havana Cigars 
of Highest Type 

UNION MADE 

NOTICE. 



The following named niemliers of 
the crew of the ".Sanla Clara," who 
were on hoard of her at the time she 
picked 11]) the "Roanoke," can y;et 
their .salvage by calling on .Attorney 
}'. R. Wall. 324 Merchant.s' K.x- 
change: .Seamen, George K. Hek- 
ker, Christen Christensen, Alf John- 
sen. !•;, Andersson, and H. .'\ndrca- 
sen; llrenien, J. Kotcharin and .\. 
S. Casky; oiler, W. Kremer; waiters, 
C. Gibson and .\. (J. Clarke; lirst 
cook, J. ['itts; second cook, J. Mar- 
tin: third cook, W. K. Pitts; pantry- 
man, ]•.. ,\ndrews. ;ind messhoy R. 
Tennanl. 



Suits Steam-Cleaned $1.50 
Phone Sutler 767 124 EAST ST. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6. 1911. is in<inired for by 
the British Consul-Gcncral at San 
Francisco. 



News from Abroad. 



Germany has endeavored to in- 
fluence public opinion in Italy with 
pamphlets, the latest of which, writ- 
ten by German leaders, has been 
published in Italian and widely dis- 
tributed. It bears the title, 'The 
Truth About the War." 

The principal Scottish railway com- 
panies intimated that in view of the 
conditions brought about by the war 
they had decided to postpone the 
payment of dividends. Throughout 
Scotland distress has been caused by 
the non-payment of dividends, and a 
movement is on foot in favor of pay- 
ments on at least the preferred ordi- 
nary stock. 

The Berliner Tageblatt announces 
that Sweden is now beginning to join 
with Holland in exporting provisions 
to Germany, It is reported that two 
large transports of live cattle have 
been brought over by the ferry at 
Sassnitz. together with large con- 
signments of tish. The scarcity of 
the latter article of food had already 
begun to make itself felt, so that the 
present supply is a cause for great 
satisfaction, ijarticularly as the fish- 
ing season has been exceptionally 
good in Sweden this year. 

Such details as have been given out 
by the British and German govern- 
ments place the loss of life from the 
sinking of the three British cruisers 
by a German submarine on Sept. 22 
at about 1400. The work was done 
I)}- a single submarine, and the whole 
oijeration occupied less than one 
hour. Minor engagements are re- 
ported from the Baltic between the 
German and Russian ships, and from 
the .Adriatic between the Austrian 
and French ships. Nothing of the 
nature of a naval battle has yet 
taken place. 

Antwerp surrendered on Oct. 9 and 
the forts surrounding the city are 
now in complete possession of the 
Germans, but the greater part of the 
Belgian army is said to have escaped. 
It took the Germans just eleven days 
to capture the strongest fortress in 
the world. The fall of Antwerp is 
evidence that even the most power- 
ful forts are no match for the colos- 
sal howitzers which the invaders have 
successfully employed against every 
fortified place that stood in their 
way. These huge guns open gaps 
through which the besiegers find an 
entrance for their field artillery and 
infantry. 

Sir Ernest Shackleton and the 
members of his transantarctic expedi- 
tion left London on September 18 
in two sections for the South Polar 
region. One party, headed by Sir 
F.rncst Shackleton, departed for 
South .'Kmerica; the other half of 
the expedition left for Ross Sea. on 
the Xew Zealand side of the .\nt- 
arctic, by way of Tasmania. Sir 
F.rncst hopes lo meet the Ross Sea 
contingent in April of next year, or. 
failing in that, by March of 1916. 
The .Shackleton section will have 
se\('nty dogs and also motor sledges. 
The other party will have twenty-six 
dogs. One great difficulty that con- 
fronted the expedition was the lack 
of scientific instruments. These had 
been ordered in Germany, but had 
not l)een delivered because of the 
war. and it was necessary to replace 
tlu'Mi in luigland. The Ross sea 
party will board the exploration ship 
".Xurora" at Hobartstown, Tasmania. 
.Sir lamest hopes to leave Buenos 
.\yres October 18 by the ship "En- 
durance," which is now en route to 
South .America. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Suspicious. — "So your husband kept 
house and cooked his own meals 
while you were away. Did he en- 
joy it?" 

"He says he did; but 1 notice that 
the parrot has learned to swear dur- 
ing my absence." — Boston Transcript. 



Understandable. — "The President 
seems to be having a hard time 
among bankers and financiers secur- 
ing members of the Federal Reserve 
Board." 

"Yes. But you must remember 
that the idea of this board is to have 
on it only honest men." — Life. 



Woman's Work.— She— Don't you 
think we would better go back 
through England again on the way 
home? 

He — But we did England. 

She— I know it. But since we were 
there think of all the lovely new 
ruins the suffragettes have made. — 
Life. 



A Warning. — Woman is certainly 
coming into her own. Even in ten- 
der romance she is exerting an in- 
fluence. 

The young man had just been ac- 
cepted. In his rapture he exclaimed. 
"But do you think, my love, I am 
good enough for you.'" 

His strong-minded fiancee looketl 
sternly at him for a moment and re- 
plied: "Good enough for me? You've 
got to be!" — Judge. 



Strategy. — Hans and Fritz, two 
small boys, had gone to the rink to 
skate. Hans's overcoat hampered 
him and he wanted to get rid of it. 
The German coatroom person does 
not check your coat unless you pay 
your fee. The fee was only a penny, 
but Hans did not have the penny. 
He was at a loss. 

"Huh! it's dead easy," spoke up 
Fritz. "Give me your overcoat. I'll 
take it to the man at the checking 
place and say I found it. He'll put 
it away. When you are ready to go 
home you go to him and ask him it 
anybody has turned a lost overcoat 
in to him. Then, of course, you'll 
get yours." — New York Evening 
Post. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cat. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWOHTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR- and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
.American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even in tiie rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Corner of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING CO. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 





UNION 



MV^OB 




J(im« ^ 3ortns«n 



ONE BIG STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, WatchmaKers, Opticians 

No purchase too small to be appreciated. To prove this, we sell: 
ALARM CLOCKS, 45c UP WATCHES, $1.00 UP 

EYE GLASSES, 60c UP 



Less Than Three 
Months Now to 

SAVE CHRISTMAS 

MONEY ' 
Are You Saving It? 

HERE'S A 50c SAVINGS BANK 
TO HELP YOU. 

Tluse Hanks 
are strongly made 
of oxidized steel, 
worth One Dollar 
Imt sell for 50c 
at HALE'S. Se- 
I lire one of these 
Banks NOW. and 
befiin immediate- 
ly to save your 
extra change. 
— It will hold any size coin. 

— It is handy and convenient. 

— Kept in a conspicuous place in 
the home it is a constant reminder 
to save. 

— You keep the Bank — we keep the 
key. 

— Hrintc tlie Hank to the Store when 
you want it opened; 

— T)r. \vh:it yoii like with the money. 
On Sale at Transfer Desk — Main Floor. 





Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
72 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



t^^^*i^s^i^s,^s^^^*,^^s^'^<^'^^^'^^<^k^s^^s^^s^>^\^s^\^>^i^^^i^i^ 



The James 11. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



h. SAMIEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

Opp. S. p. Depot at Third & Townsend 

Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



CmflBUST'EU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 









;^v.V^S^x ^v-v .^ -cycj^r^X-.v ^^y^.v ■f.,^..^^;^;?;^;;;;^;:^^:^ 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Oiu- Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVIII, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1914. 



Whole No. 2300. 



TO TAX LABO R SAV ING DEVICES. 

An Outline of a Plan to Shift Taxation From Man to Machine. 



Congressman Michael J. Gill of Missouri 
advocates a tax on automatic machines and 
other machines of industry which have dis- 
placed human labor, sufficient at least to run 
the Government. 

His argument upon this subject, made in 
the House of Representatives, on September 25, 
1914, is worthy of careful perusal, and is there- 
fore reprinted herewith, in full: 

Mr. Gill. Mr. Speaker and gentlemen of the 
House, in the short time allotted me in the 
final discussion of the war-tax bill now pending, 
I wish to confine my remarks specifically to the 
machine, and more particularly to the auto- 
matic machine now in general use in industry. 

Human labor, Mr. Speaker, is the universal 
element which enters into all conceptions of 
value. That which the world recognizes as 
concrete wealth has embedded in its heart the 
applied stored-up labor of a past time. Wring 
from your myriad indices of wealth this uni- 
versal factor and you transform them back again 
to a state of nature. Our own continent in all 
that makes for outward, tangible wealth is the 
richest in the world's history. At no time in the 
chronology of past centuries has any nation 
approximated its billions upon billions of visible 
symbols of wealth. And yet on that October 
day in 1492 when Christopher Columbus found 
a new continent, it was absolutely void of a 
dollar's worth of value. It is almost incon- 
ceivable that in the short space of 422 years 
the human beings who have since made this 
continent their home could, by the application 
of their brain, bone, and brawn, to the plastic 
material of a virgin continent have transformed 
it from a trackless wilderness into the thriving, 
prosperous communities which now so resplen- 
dently adorn each and every country of this 
Western Hemisphere. Speech is powerless to 
adequately measure the boundless wealth which 
still sleeps within the bosom of its future, and 
a wise statesmanship will always have in mind 
the proper conservation of those factors in- 
herent in its life and growth. 

All political economists are agreed that labor 
is the one universal element which enters into 
and becomes the necessary factor of each and 
every object of value known to civilized man. 
That function of labor — its universality, and 
because of it, the responsibility of parenthood 
toward the creatures of sense compels it to 
take on what to me is the function of labor — 
its universality, makes it the principal element 
in the life of objective value. Rob any object 
of its inner life-giving labor element and it 
immediately becomes dead, useless, and value- 
less. 

Now, sir, I am prepared at this stage of my 
inquiry to approach the analysis of the bill 
before this House (H. R. 18891, the war tax 
measure) with as large an element of candor, 
fairness, and justice as human insight into its 
problems can give to man. The great European 
war has brought on an absolutely unlooked-for 
condition. No superior foresight of statesman- 
ship could have given ample warning of its 



coming. It is here and we must face it. Our 
able President has so brilliantly outlined what 
our duties are, and I, as a humble Democrat, 
am here to offer my loyal and unqualified 
support to him and his administration in this 
crisis. Let us have a war tax such as he sug- 
gests, and let us get busy and furnish it with- 
out too much delay. But in doing this I wish 
to utter a solemn warning, do not shackle labor 
with too onerous a burden. Remember, gentle- 
men, labor, the universal element in all forms of 
value, must not be taxed to death. Each 
separate entity of creation has its finite limit, 
beyond which endurance can not and dare not 
go. Wise conservation of society's labor ele- 
ment would call for the energizing instead of 
the enervating deed. Tax labor with too many 
burdens and you enervate the one substance 
which gives health, virility, and stability to the 
body whole. A wise, social husbandman would 
seek to keep alive and vigorous its ever-neces- 
sary labor factor. 

Mr. Speaker and gentlemen of this House, 
I am ever ready to give the .eye and ear of 
patient inquiry into the social need and shall 
hold myself ready to co-operate with all reason- 
able haste toward that consummation. But I 
am too much of a Democrat — aye, too much of 
a lover of my kind — to blindly stand aloof 
and permit an unreason do that for me and 
mine which spells misery, squalor, and actual 
want to millions of humble toilers in our land. 

Gentlemen, our age is clamoring for quantity. 
Its great cry is more, and ever yet more. It 
recks not sympathy and knows no kin; nor 
youth, nor age, nor man, nor woman are 
subjects in the category of its reason. They 
know what they want, and call for what they 
know. It has transpired that in the domain 
of experience they have found a neuter thing 
called a machine, which does more with less 
trouble than the human which it has supplanted. 
It has no conscience, likewise no heart. It does 
not think and can not complain. It has no 
sense of time nor of place, and with a slight 
modicum of care and attention it whirrs away in 
ceaseless activity by day, by night, winter or 
summer, year in, year out, week day or Sunday, 
without let or hindrance. This creation of 
man's brain has taken his job away from him. 
The owners of it are waxing fat and great in 
the golden streams that flow from its loins. 
All admit that the profits or advantages of 
machine ownership are real, are ever-increasing. 
In the domain' of political economy we desig- 
nate this an advantage enjoyed. Therefore, Mr. 
Speaker, T think it both right and logical that 
for the advantage which the State ever gives 
in the security of life, liberty, and happiness 
to the least of its component parts the machine 
be asked to contribute back to the State an 
equitable pro rata share of the burdens of the 
State's' maintenance. I insist that the war tax 
contemplated by this bill, under the extra- 
ordinary conditions now prevailing, in their 
proper proportion be also shared by the machine 
owners of industry, who receive the lion's share 
of its profits. I am not asking more than has 
ever been the vogue from time immemorial in 
regard to the person of the citizen in a State. 



He is ever expected by tradition, by custom, 
and by law to render his personal service back 
to his State in times of war as in the walks 
of peace, and why not demand the same obliga- 
tion of the machine which has usurped his 
sphere? 

Is it wrong in any sense to expect such 
a return from a machine-owned industry in 
order that our common country may still enjoy 
the blessings of government and peace among 
men? Is it asking more in its fair proportion 
than you as individuals already have and expect 
from the men and women of this Republic in 
the days of its imminent peril? And would 
not every loyal man and woman in our great 
country leap with bounding joy at the prospect 
of succoring our common countrj^'s need when 
danger stalks abroad? I ask nothing unreason- 
able. I ask only that which I deem is right. 
Let us get from the machine of modern in- 
dustry its fair proportion of taxation, in con- 
junction with that of all of its citizens, that 
our great country may live and thrive and con- 
tinue ever the land of the world's oppressed 
and a haven of peace. To that end let us con- 
serve all of our processes of life and apportion 
its proper pro rata share of taxation to each 
and all alike — the personal as well as the im- 
personal elements of our economic structure. 

In the evolution of human society it has 
happened that the newer and more complex 
needs of the social whole have gradually sub- 
stituted the machine-made goods for those 
which were distinctively the immediate product 
of man's labor expended thereon. We are com- 
pelled to admit by all the unanswerable proofs 
of the senses that we are in the age of the 
machine. The products of labor are now medi- 
ated through the machine before they get into 
the market for the consumer's need. The day 
of handmade commodities is past. We do not 
want nor is there a desire on the part of the 
least of us to turn back the dial of time and 
stay the hand of progress. We welcome the 
machine as a blessing to mankind. We have 
learned the blessing of the cooperant-labor 
products, and are only asking that these bless- 
ings be extended downward as well as upward 
through all the grades of human society. The 
proper dispensation of the blessings of cooper- 
ant labor calls for consideration certain neces- 
sary factors of production and distribution 
which are inherent in the constitution of so- 
ciety. They may be properly grouped into 
those which make for development and those 
which conserve society's processes. 

In the category of development of society's 
processes a proper regard must be had, first, 
to the phj'sical make-up of the man; and, 
second, lo the tools he has found necessary to 
invent to supplement his bodily labor effort in 
winning from nature a proper support for 
himself in health and happiness. Man nuist 
apply himself at first hand to the things within 
the compass of his horizon which will sustain 
his body in health against the opposing ele- 
ments always at hand to wear out his bone and 
tissue. Labor properly directed in an environ- 
ment favorable for its employment will accom- 
plish this result. This favorable environment 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



must be there. If in any degree it is curtailed, 
labor's applied effort is lessened, and if not re- 
moved, in time, will be valueless, as far as the 
human being using it is concerned. Favorable 
opportunity and health of body and mind must 
always be present to accomplish more than the 
minimum of aggregate results. 

As man emerges out of a distinctively simple 
form of society, where the labor effort is closely 
connected and associated with what it produces 
and takes its stand alongside of and in com- 
pany with other labor of a kind, then the 
problem of subsistence becomes intensified in 
the ratio of increased labor power exerted on a 
common environment, which calls for an ever 
widening circle of labor opportunity. Should 
this opportunity fail to appear or become ir- 
regular or intermittent then the precariousness 
of labor in the field of its employment is again 
complicated by the struggle among the labor 
units to find a proper field for its functioning. 
This struggle, as society advances and becomes 
more complex, becomes ever and anon a mad 
race for the coveted goal — which is, after all, 
nothing more than the original status of man 
in the primal society — of an opportunity to so 
place his labor power in a favorable environ- 
ment as to win for his body its support in 
health and happiness. At heart our modern 
complex society is no dififerent from its simpler 
primal social status. Man in any event in the 
domain of sociology must so place his nature- 
given labor power as to win his own proper 
sustenance from mother earth. Rob him of his 
God-given right to apply his labor in the 
smallest degree possible and you place a burden 
on his back which again lessens the dynamics 
of his personally applied labor effort. In the 
domain of experience he has only too early 
learned that this has been his heritage. 

From savage culture up the long and toil- 
some pathway of the ages he has only too early 
found out tiiat his fellow man, either from 
greed or an overweening egoism or avaricious- 
ness, has inflicted untold tortures on his weak 
and unprotected brother; and we find the annals 
of man's work strewn with countless and re- 
fined methods of cruelties inflicted for selfish 
personal gain. On closer analysis nearly all 
wars in history have been nothing more than 
an inner expression on the part of the com- 
batants of some economic advantage about 
which they could not come in agreement. This 
persistent strife for advantage has been _ the 
prolific mother of discord in all time, and it is 
but uttering a trite commonplace in discussing 
the component parts of this measure of taxa- 
tion when it is pointed out that some part of 
the aggregate whole is to be benefited or 
harmed in the specific case. I simply dwell on 
this fact at this time so as to bring home 
what is very clear to all observers — that our 
present economic structure of society presents 
the phenomenon of a very few millionaires, 
and all the rest beside paying- tribute to their 
arbitrary but, I hope, temporary assumption 
of power. The ownership by our few million- 
aires of large industries, employing millions of 
human beings who are working in many in- 
stances on what are almost perfect automatic 
machines, makes our problem of special taxa- 
tion one of great importance to the country at 
large. A very vital question which here ob- 
trudes itself is the one which asks. Who will 
you tax? Will it be the human being slaving 
iong hours under the prospect of a constantly 
decreasing purchasing power of his wage, or 
will this Congress have the courage to see its 
duty to the great masses of mankind, whose 
opportunity is gradually slipping away from 
them and becoming embalmed in the ever- 
increasing sphere of the automatic machine in 
industry? Or can we see and locate the ever- 
increasing responsibility that inures to the 
ownership of automatic machines in industry of 
a kind? Mr. Speaker and gentlemen of this 
House, are you aware of the magnitude of the 
statement I have just made? Are you not 
cognizant of the fact that in nearly if not all 
the great staple industries of our economic 
structure the bulk of the work is now being 
done by the almost human machine of per- 
fectibility? That being true, are you not also 
aware of the other terrible fact that the army 
of workers chained to the toil of these ma- 
chines, in the great average, man for man, aye, 
woman for woman, are but minor and secondary 
factors in industry's economic life? _ The one 
and unmistakable sign of supremacy is that the 
machine as now constituted is the main factor 
of industry's existence. Our machines are nearly 
perfect in their mechanism, and the products 
that flow from them ought in all justice and 
equity be called on to carry the social burden 
of a tax. 

Mr. Speaker, my point of contention is — and 
I cannot make it too strong — that the product 
of the almost automatic machine ought to 
bear the brunt of this taxation. Some one will 
cry out. Why designate a thing so specifically? 
Do not you think that would be special or 
"class" legislation? I answer back as quickly 
as I can, most assuredlv so; and because they, 
as a part — a very small part or class — of the 
whole of society, are enjoying — I might add 
monopolizing — the total profits of a socialized 
industry, to the exclusion of the great mass 
of our country who are not of the elect of that 
favored few. I am not craven coward enough 
to withhold my honest convictions when I see, 
and know from experience, what is transpiring 
in our very midst. Mr. Speaker, the trusts of 



our land — the interlocking group of industry 
owners — own the Frankensteins of production, 
aye, the marvelously complex machines which 
in evolution's gradual progression have come 
into our midst, and by reason of this ownership 
can, do, and ever increasingly will command 
the great makets of supply and demand and 
arbitrarily fix the price which the ultimate 
consumer will have to pay — who in our day and 
time is no one else than the millions of de- 
pendent toilers of our great country leading a 
hand-to-mouth existence by reason of the cur- 
tailed opportunity. 

Mr. Speaker, the progressive, up-to-date work- 
ingman of our country looks not with hate at 
the machine which has taken his job from 
him. In the days of his harvest and plenty 
he had gone to school in the many senses in 
which that term can be used. In this school 
he has learned the great lessons of the social 
need for the very instrumentality which has 
taken his means of livelihood from him. 

As a law-abiding citizen and a man of family, 
he has bravely taken his bitter medicine in 
calmness and stoic humility. His is that ever- 
present human element which the oceanic up- 
heavals of society have cast upon the shores 
of time; and before going out forever the only 
sound heard above the din and roar of the 
breakers is the plaintive wail of sad-eyed 
mothers and children as they sit and hope and 
wait for the father's return. Ah, what frail 
tragedies are enacted in the homes of labor, 
where the nemesis of the machine has over- 
taken the skill and dignity and self-respect of 
the craftsman of a now vanishing past. The 
inexorable need of an ever-expanding social 
progress has called for and received its victims, 
and the votaries of a newer time can never 
know the many gaping wounds and desolate 
homes it has cost to buy this meed of progress 
for the future. Ah, this human element, Mr. 
Speaker. What waves of sadness well up in me 
when memory brings back the sterling figures 
of fellow workmen who have succumbed to the 
inevitable. Why the retrospect? The light of 
that time is becoming dim and hazy, and as the 
shadow figures disappear below the horizon I 
am aware that night has come, and fagged 
brain and tired limbs call for rest — the night of 
labor whose enveloping folds draw unto itself 
the feverish quest and lagging footsteps of a 
father, out of work, an only too true type of 
a workman displaced by the machine. Why 
ask less from a machine into whose ever in- 
satiable maw pour the swollen streams of social 
profit and gain? If the greatest proportion of 
social profit and gain inures to machine owner- 
ship, then as social stewards of control this 
Congress must lay the hand of governmental 
authority on the shoulder of machine owner- 
ship and say, "Gentlemen, our country's common 
need in this period of extraordinary conditions 
looks to you, asks you — aye, commands you by 
law — to render back to its parent source a 
proper pro rata tax or share of the parent's 
present support." Is not this practical? Is not 
this fair? Is not this just? Is not this right? 



HURRY UP, SENATOR. 



After the "Titanic" disaster Wm. Alden 
Smith, Senator from Michigan, vigoroitsly 
declared himself, publicly, in favor of leg- 
islation to safeguard life at sea and to give 
justice. 

A bill which will make life safer for the 
toiler of the sea and the traveler by sea 
is now before the national legislative body. 

It is now being held up by the Commit- 
tee on Commerce of the Senate. 

Senator Smith is an important member 
of that committee. 

President Stanley Anderson of the Fed- 
eration of Labor telegraphed the Michigan 
Senator urging him to do his best to have 
this measure made into law at this session 
of Congress. 

This is Senator Smith's answer: 

Oct. 4, 1914. 
My Dear Sir:— 

I am just in receipt of your telegram com- 
plaining of the progress being made on the 
Seamen's Bill, now pending in the Senate. I 
know you desire to be fully informed as to the 
present situation in the Senate. The Seamen's 
Bill is before a sub-committee of the Committee 
on Commerce. The sub-committee is composed 
of three Democrats and two Republicans. You 
will readily understand that it is not in the 
power of Senator Burton and myself to control 
the action of the sub-committee, and we have 
made no efforts to do so. I have been anxious 
that no unnecessary burden should be placed 
upon our lake shipping, but I am very strongly 
in favor of every practical safeguard against 
disasters at sea, and I voted for the Nelson Bill 
two years ago and will support any just measure 
now. I understand that the representatives of 



foreign governments are responsible for the 
present delay. 

With kindest regards, I am, 

Cordially yours, 
WILLIAM ALDEN SMITH. 
Mr. Stanley Anderson, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Senator Smith, why bluff any longer? 

Come out into the open. 

Detroit labor believes in common with 
labor throughout the country that one Wm. 
Alden Smith, member of the United States 
Senate from Michigan, and an important 
member of the Committee on Commerce, 
which has to do with this safety measure, 
can decide this important matter without 
delay. 

Will he do it? 

Which does he think deserves help most 
— the Dollars or the People? 

Senator Smith, Michigan labor will 
watch you. 

Michigan labor knows that the Great 
Lakes Millionaire Shipping Corporation 
wants this bill killed. 

President Livingstone and other men of 
the shipping interests on the Lakes were 
not in the great storm of a year ago, in 
which so many toilers of the sea met 
watery graves. 

If they were they might look at matters 
in a different light. 

Their concern is dollars, dollars, dollars. 

They don't want the Seamen's bill to be- 
come law. 

They and the kept press will do their 
best to defeat the proposals of the toilers 
and those who place safety above the 
dollar. 

This Seamen's bill ought to be law now. 

Three times has it passed through the 
House. 

Twice has it passed through the Senate. 

Now it is delayed. 

Senator Smith, step out like a man and 
place humanity before greed. 

President Wilson also has a duty to per- 
form. 

In his inaugural address President Wil- 
son said that measures ought to be taken 
to protect seamen. 

President Wilson has many qualities ad- 
mired by all. 

We cannot believe that President Wilson 
declared, the other day, that he did not 
think it necessary to act on the safety-at- 
sea matter during the present session. 

The ship-owning interests seek delay. 

Labor demands that those who hold posi- 
tions of public trust do their duty. 

Senator Smith, the next move is yours. 

If you decide to help the bill through it 
will go through the Committee on Com- 
merce without delay. 

It's your next move Senator, so hurry 
up. — Detroit Labor News. 



The African possessions and protectorates 
of the European powers now at war are 
more than three times as large as Conti- 
nental United States. They are more than 
three times as large as all of Europe now 
plunged in war, and are eleven times larger 
than England, France. Germany, and Bel- 
gium, which control them-. The largest in- 
dividual holder of African territory is 
France, with 3,812,000 square miles, more 
than a million and a half of which is the 
Sahara Desert. England controls 3,618,245 
square miles; Belgium, with Belgian Congo 
as its sole possession. 802,000 square miles, 
and Germany L03S,086 square miles. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Friends of Seamen's Bill Urged to Press 
Its Passage By U. S. Senate. 

Trade unionists, sympathizers, and all 
other citizens who favor safety of life at 
sea are urged to immediately telegraph or 
write their respective United States Sena- 
tors, urging them to favor the passage of 
the Seamen's bill, which passed the Senate 
last fall and was passed in an amended 
form by the House on August 27. 

This bill is now in the Committee on 
Commerce of the Senate, where it is liable 
to remain unless those who favor lessening 
sea disasters become alert to the danger 
of the bill remaining in committee during 
these closing days of the present Congress. 

The Democratic textbook, issued by that 
party for use in the coming campaign, pre- 
dicts the passage of this bill as follows : 
"At this writing the bill is in conference, 
but it is certain of becoming a completed 
'achievement' before Congress adjourns." 

Because this session of Congress is near- 
ing an end, trade unionists are not the 
only ones who refuse to accept this roseate 
view, as is shown by the following editorial, 
published in the Washington Times, issue 
of October 5 : 

"Pass the Seamen's Bill. 

"More than two years ago it passed the 
House. The short session of the Fifty- 
third Congress passed an emasculated bill 
that was pocket-vetoed by Taft. On the 
23d of October last year, the Senate passed 
a good bill. The International Conference 
on Safety of Life at Sea was used as an 
excuse for delaying action in the House. 
When the conference had completed its la- 
bors, the Senate Committee on Foreign 
Relations refused to indorse the action 
taken at London, except in a modified 
form. The last month for ratification of 
the London conference on safety of life at 
sea is December coming. It has not been 
ratified and plainly will not now be. 

"About a month ago the House passed a 
substitute, which is now in the Committee 
on Commerce of the Senate. The excuse 
for delaying action now is possibly inter- 
national complications,' in which no one 
really believes. The real purpose seems to 
be the opposition of the ship owners, who 
are utterly opposed to any real change. 

"The 'Titanic,' the 'Volturno,' the 'Mon- 
roe,' and the 'Empress of Ireland,' aside 
from several other vessels, the latest being 
the 'Leggett,' on the coast of California, 
have been lost with large numbers of peo- 
ple, and yet no legislation to remedy the 
present ineffective law dealing with life- 
saving appliances and men to handle them. 
The testimony is unanimous that the dif- 
ference in the cost of operation is, under 
existing law, so much in favor of foreign 
vessels that we cannot compete. It is 
equally conceded that the passage of the 
Seamen's bill would place us in a position 
to compete; and yet when the different bills 
that are to be passed prior to adjournment 
of this session are enumerated, we do not 
find the Seamen's bill among them. 

"All the information that can possibly be 
obtained on this subject has been obtained. 
It is purely a question of getting the bill 



into conference and getting it passed. Both 
political parties are equally pledged to this 
legislation. The pledge was not made to 
the seamen, it was made to the people of 
the country. It was not made in haste or 
without consideration, it was made after 
careful investigation that followed the loss 
of the 'Titanic' There can be no legiti- 
mate reason for not passing this bill be- 
fore Congress adjourns. Let the bill be 
passed and the promises kept." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Justice Wright Resigns Office. 

Justice Wright, of the Supreme Court of 
the District of Columbia, has handed his 
resignation to President Wilson, to take 
effect November 15. 

It is agreed the resignation will be ac- 
cepted, as this action of Justice Wright 
has been expected for some time. 

The Congressional impeachment investi- 
gation that has been conducted for some 
time as to the judicial fitness of Justice 
Wright will probably be dropped. 

The charges were made last March by 
Representative Park, of Georgia, in the 
form of a resolution instructing the Com- 
mittee on the Judiciary to inquire and re- 
port whether action by the House is neces- 
sary "concerning the alleged official mis- 
conduct of Daniel Thew Wright ; whether 
he has accepted favors from lawyers ap- 
pearing before him ; whether he has per- 
mitted counsel for a street railway to in- 
dorse his notes while said counsel was 
engaged in business and causes before his 
court ; whether he has collected and wrong- 
fully appropriated other people's money; 
whether he has purposely changed the rec- 
ord in order to prevent the reversal of 
causes wherein he presided ; whether he has 
arbitrarily revoked, without legal right, an 
order of a judge of concurrent jurisdiction, 
appointing three receivers so as to favor 
his friend by appointing him sole receiver; 
whether he is morally and temperamentally 
unfit to hold judicial office, and whether 
he has been guilty of various other acts of 
personal and judicial misconduct for which 
he should be impeached." 

As the Committee on Judiciary estab- 
lished a precedent a few years ago in the 
case of a western judge who resigned while 
impeachment charges were pending, the 
same course will probably be followed in 
this case. 

Justice Wright attracted attention of a 
certain kind because of his judicial bearing 
at the trials and when sentencing President 
Gompers, Vice-President Mitchell and Sec- 
retary Morrison to one year, nine months 
and six months in jail, respectively, be- 
cause of an alleged violation of an injunc- 
tion issued by Judge Gould in the Buck's 
Stove and Range Company case. In pass- 
ing sentence, Justice Wright was most bit- 
ter and abusive in speech. 

When the United States Supreme Court 
set these verdicts aside, and ordered the 
case remanded for trial "without prejudice," 
Justice Wright gave an exhibition of his 
"judicial temperament" by his appointment 
of three lawyers who were ordered to in- 
vestigate and report whether there was 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime BIdg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband. Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B,, Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Geneva, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transpo "t, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marincros, Calle Ingia- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benediclinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



Proportionate to population, Aus- 
tralia is said to have, in point of 
numbers, the strongest union move- 
ment in the world. 

Railway guards at Yass, Moss 
Vale, and Gunning (N. S. W.) have 
ceased work because a reduction of 
wages was threatened, and it is said 
3000 men may be affected. 

The builders' laborers in the em- 
ploy of the Victorian Railway Com- 
missioners threaten to strike unless 
the latter pay the rate of wages 
fixed by the Industrial Appeals 
Court. 

All citizens in the South African 
Union must undergo a certain period 
of training in time of peace for mili- 
tary service, and those between their 
seventeenth and sixtieth years are 
liable to serve in time of war. 

It is reported that the Govern- 
ment of South Africa has decided to 
allow the deported union leaders to 
return to South Africa. Lord Glad- 
stone, who sanctioned their banish- 
ment, is now in England and out of 
public life. 

The total number of fatal accidents 
to seamen reported to the British 
Board of Trade during June, 1914, 
was 213 (172 of this number being 
reported as lost in the steamship 
"Empress of Ireland"), as compared 
with 91 a month ago, and 40 a year 
ago. 

The Trades Hall building in Syd- 
ney (N. S. W.) cost £39,000. With 
an object of enlarging it, three pieces 
of adjoining land were recently 
bought, and £25,000 more are to be 
spent in enlarging the hall. The 
new portion of the building is to 
contain a large assembly room. 

Military training in the citizen 
forces for a number of days is, 
subject to certain exceptions, obliga- 
tory under penalties in Australia for 
men under the age of twenty-six; but 
this obligation docs not apply to any 
person who reached the age of 
eighteen years before the first of 
January, 1911. 

The tenth biennial convention of 
the International Brotherhood of 
Maintenance-of-Way Employes held 
at W'innipeg, Man., was a success- 
ful gathering of representatives of 
this organization, which has made 
exceptional gains during the past few 
years because of its advocacy of 
trade union principles. 

The average weekly number of 
vacancies notified to all labor ex- 
changes in the United Kingdom for 
the four weeks ended June 12, 1914, 
was 25,878, as compared with 28,326 
in the previous four weeks, and 
with 25,725 in the four weeks ended 
June 13, 1913. The average weekly 
number of vacancies filled for the 
same periods were 19,086, 20,700, and 
18,882 respectively. 

Returns relating to unemployment 
in May were received by the Dutch 
government statistical office from 
trade-unions and municipal unemploy- 
ment funds \vith a total membership 
f>f 73,497. The percentage of mem- 
bers out of work during the month 
was 5.9, as compared with 4.8 in 
the previous month and 4.2 in May, 
1913. This percentage is obtained by 
taking for each of the four (or five) 
weeks in the month under considera- 
ation the number of persons unem- 
ployed on one or more days of the 
week. The proportion of the aver- 
age of these four (or five) numbers 
to the total membership of the 
funds gives the percentage. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BRONVN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 
EXCLUSIVE AGENT *FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

.437 RROINT STREET SAIN PEDRO 



"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 

It will be to your interest to call on 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postoffice 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Alfred Kupfer, born February 9, 
1890, at Coburg, Germany, is in- 
quired for by the German Consulate, 
201 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johannes Puun, born in Oesel, 
Arensburg, Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 

Anybody knowing the where- 
abouts of Arne Johnsen please 
notify O. M. Johnsen, Mosby, 
Christiansand S., Norway. 

Fritjof Ellingsen, age 32, a native 
of Drammen, Norway, he was short, 
heavy set, dark hair, parted in the 
center, and good looking. Anybody 
knowing his whereabouts please noti- 
fy Ed Knach, 171 Clipper street, city. 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister. Miss Lucy Wood, 108 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, San Francisco. 

$10.00 reward will be paid by 
Johnson & Higgins, 244 California 
street, for information locating John 
Anderson and George T. Nelson, 
who were members of the crew of 
the steamship "Asuncion" in Octo- 
ber, 1908. 
I John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



A SAILOR'S BANK 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-FARING MEN 

• — ■ in the ■ — 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish .^Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch. Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON. Manager 



San Pedro Letter List. 

.\iiil. isen, A. -1645 Kremer, Sigurd 

.•Vnilersen. Rasmus Kalnamm, Andvey 

Andersen, Martin Kolodzie, George 

Anderson, Axel Krlstlansen, Nils 
Andcrsson, E. -1762 Karstin. Hugo 

Anderson, H. -1883 Leldeker, E. 

A., Mr. -1504 Lang, Chas. 

Andersen, Edward Lindner. J. -1750 

Anderson, Gust Lundberg, T. 

Alin, Emll Lyngard. Jorgen 
Anderson. David C. Mesak, E. 

Bensen, Severin Mikalsen. Andreas 

Berndt, Hugo Martlnelli, Walter 

Bringsrud, Marald Mennlcke, Fritz 

Berg, S. Miller, Wm. 

Brogard, N. Mayers. P. M. 

Bergqvist, Wm. Micliaelsen, A. -1105 

Boy, A. Morris. M. H. 

Cirul, M. Matison, J. -1320 

Christensen, A. Makinan, K. 

-1095 NUson. Edon. C. 

Cotter, J. Olsen, A. O. -759 

Carlson, Kalle Olsen, Hans 

Ceelan. John Olsen, Ole Wilhelm 

Clausen, J. Osterberg, S. H. 
Chilton, Harry -1284 

Caddel. Adolf Olsen, O. Marthin 

Carlson, Carl Paader, Hugo 

Dreger. .Tack Paulson, Gustaf 

Kssi-n, Carl Perez, Antonio 

Klllngson. Ivar Plant, BilUe 

Fasholz, Dan Peterson, C. E. -903 

Folvik, Lewis Rutel. Ernest 

Grigoleit, E. Bobbins, Jack 

Gunther, Dick Sandstrom, Ivar 

Giistafson. Alf Svensen, Nick 

Gvi.sek, B. Svendsen, S. -1717 

Gronlund, Oskar Steen. J. C. 

Holml)org, Frank Sandy, Oskar 

Hansen. Marius Samuelsen. Victor 

Holm, Arthur Schultz, Albert 
Hansen, H. T. -1446Schultz. Axel 

Hansen, Johannes Sanseter, Paul 

Hakonsen, P. O. Schmidt, George 

Haro, Aarp Schager, E. 

Harrold, Henry Svenningsen. S. N. 

Hermanson. Fritz Schultz, Robert 

Johansen, Ed. -2240 Tell. Olaf 

Johansen, Emil Tvedt, Olaf 

Johansson, N. A. Thomas, Joseph W. 

-280 Vohs, Helnrich 

Jensen. Oscar M. Wagner, Billy 

Johnson. John A. Zimmer, Walter 
Jorgensen. H. P. Packages. 

Johnsen, George Johansen, Nils A. 
Karlson, Richard 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, Anton 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Edvard 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Gusz, Henry 
Hansen, Eugen 
Hansen, Jens 
Jorgensen, C. M. 



Johanson, John -880 
Kosklnen, Suttro 
More, Walter 
Silver, Salin E. 
Ivertsen, Slgvald B. 
Speckman. Mae 
Tomkin, Frank 



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which is entirely different from the 
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The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealer In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



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C. A. BRUCE 



GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
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UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 



CIGARS, TOBACCO, SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Peter Bellenot, who last sailed on 
the S. S. "Mariposa" out of Seattle, 
Wash., about November, 1912, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Mrs. Bel- 
lenot, 1406 Second street. West 
Berkeley, Cal. Anyone knowing of 
him kindly write at the above ad- 
dress. — 6-24-14. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify the 
mother, Fru Thorin, Hegagata 7. 
Goteborg, Sweden. 9-23-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Assistant Surgeon L. W. Jenkins of the Public 
Health Service and four members of the crew of 
the revenue cutter "Manning" were drowned off 
the Alaskan coast, according to a report re- 
ceived by the Revenue Cutter Service. 

Frank Waterhouse & Co. were awarded the 
contract for transporting 2000 tons of Govern- 
ment oats from Portland to Manila, as that firm 
was the only one to send in a bid for the busi- 
ricss. The, company agreed to transport the 
2000 tons to Manila' at $4.50 a ton. 

It is said that on account of the steamers 
"Edgar H. Vance" and "George W. Fenwick" 
going into the lumber trade between this coast 
and New York next month, the Hammond Lum- 
ber Company is to charter smaller craft for the 
coast service. Among the latter will be the 
sleam schooner "Olson & Mahoney." 

The schooner "Geneva" has arrived at Guaya- 
quil (Ecuador) from Galapagos, bringing Captain 
Roberts and a part of the crew of the British 
oil tank steamer "Elsinore," which was sunk by 
the German cruiser "Leipzig" ofif the Mexican 
coast September 11. The remainder of the crew 
of the Elsinore remains at Galapagos, where 
they were landed by the cruiser. 

President Chamberlin of the Grand Trunk 
Railway has announced that the Grand Trunk 
has decided to build one of the largest drydocks 
in Prince Rupert, at which a 20,000-ton haltle- 
sliip can be docked. Work will be started Jan- 
uary 1. A full, complete shipbuilding plant, as 
good as anything New York can boast of, will 
be in full swing shortly after the first of the year. 
Rates on merchandise and general consign- 
ments to ports in the Orient have been advanced 
25 per cent, by the lines composing the trans- 
pacific freight bureau. The advance is made on 
account of the extra hazard occasioned by the 
war. This is the second advance announced 
within the last few weeks. On August 1 the 
rates on wheat and flour were raised by the 
bureau. 

The first cargo of Atlantic range coal con- 
signed to the United States Government here — 
to be moved via the Panama Canal — arrived 
during the past week in the holds of the new 
British freighter "Vimeria," Captain Pattie. which 
was twenty-three days from Norfolk and four- 
teen days steaming from Balboa, the Pacific 
terminal of the big ditch. The "Vimcria's" 
cargo amounted to 8200 tons and is intended for 
the California City naval bunkers. 

Portland steamship men believe that the Gov- 
ernment should establish a limit for deckloads. 
so that no such marine disaster as that of the 
"Francis H. Leggett" be repeated. This feeling 
prevails among practically all masters of lumber 
vessels sailing out of Portland, who assert that 
the unusually heavy loads are placed aboard to 
please some managing owner or the part owner- 
master. It is believed the British regulations 
applying during the winter should be adopted by 
the U. S. Government for the Pacific Coast. 

Captain E. Beetham, R. N. R., marine super- 
intendent of the C. P. R. transpacific service, 
has gone to Montreal, and it is presumed that 
his mission has some connection v\-ith the report 
that the C. P. R. are contemplating taking over 
a large steamship to maintain some semblance 
of service on the Pacific. In the event of the 
Hill liner "Minnesota" being taken over by the 
C. P. R. it is more than probable that she would 
be operated, temporarily at any rate, under 
American registry. This would preclude any 
possibility of her being chartered by the British 
Admiralty. 

The schooner "S. T. Alexander," owned by the 
Charles Nelson Company of this city, is a total 
loss on Toku Island, in the South Seas, accord- 
ing to advices received from Suva. Captain 
Lorenzen and his crew were saved from the 
wreck. The "Alexander," which left Puget 
Sound on July 18 with a cargo of lumber, was 
bound from Suva for Pago-Paeo when she was 
driven on the island reef. Captain Lorenzen 
and the crew will return by steamer. The 
schooner was a four-master of 779 tons and 
was well known in the offshore lumber traffic. 
She was built at Fairhaven, Wash., in 1899. 

On her maiden voyage in a maiden service the 
new freighter "Neches." Captain Young, arrived 
at San Francisco durinof the past week from 
Baltimore after a run of twenty-two davs via 
the P.Tnama Canal. She brought a cargo of coal. 
The "Neches." which plies in the coast to coast 
service of Sudden & Christenson, is a freighter 
of the most modern tyne, and is faster than most 
vessels of her class. Sudden & Christenson an- 
nounced that the steamer "Peter H. Crowell," 
now en route from here to New York, will load 
at Mobile early in November for San Francisco. 
This will give Mobile shippers a new service at 
attractive rates and will result, it is said, in open- 
ing up the southern country for a direct water 
route to the Golden Gate. 

"Not guilty," was the verdict reached by a 
'ury in Federal Judge Dooling's court at San 
Francisco in the case of Captain Harrv Stremmel, 
First Officer Robert Hill, Second Officer Eric 
Probers and Purser Robert C. Pitt, of the tur- 
biner "Harvard," who were on trial for an al- 



leged attack on Louis G. Lull, a waiter on the 
vessel. The jury had reported several times that 
it could not agree before it reached a verdict. 

The comedy-drama of the American steamer 
"Sacramento," formerly the "Alexandria" of the 
German Kosmos line, whose new owners have 
been unsuccessfully trying for three weeks to 
have her cleared from San Francisco, reached a 
near climax at 1 o'clock on October 15, when 
clearance papers were finally granted, and a full 
climax several hours later, when the vessel was 
stopped just inside the Golden Gate by the 
revenue cutter "Hartley." But everything turned 
out happily in the end, and at 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon the "Sacramento" steamed peacefully 
out of the Gate with a cargo of coal and 1000 
tons of miscellaneous merchandise, billed for 
Valparaiso. 

The German gunboat "Geier" from Tsing-Tau, 
China, arrived at Honolulu on October 15 with 
a complement of 100 men, twenty-four hours in 
advance of the Japanese liner "Shinyo Maru." 
Beyond saying that they intended to coal ship 
the officers of the "Geier" were silent. The 
gunboat showed no signs of having been in 
action, but the scraped appearance of her port 
.=ide indicated that she might have been coaled 
at sea. Inasmuch as this is the "Geier's" first 
appearance in an American port, she is entitled 
to twenty-four hours' stay and as much coal as 
will take her to the nearest German port. Since 
all the German naval bases in the Pacific have 
been seized, this is equivalent to permission to 
fill her bunkers, but after coaling she must not 
revisit any American port for the next three 
months. This is the second German warship to 
coal at Honolulu since the war began. The 
"Nurnberg," which later wrecked the Fanning 
Island cable station, was the other. With the 
"Geier" came the North German Lloyd mer- 
chantman "Locksun," apparently acting as a col- 
lier. She began taking on coal immediately. 
The two vessels are sixty days out from Tsing- 
Tau. 

.Several officials of the operating department of 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, the base 
of which has been shifted from San Francisco 
to Seattle, were passengers on a recent north- 
bound trip of the "President." The party in- 
cluded W. IT. Alison, superintending engineer; 
H. K. Laidlaw, general port steward, and Law- 
rence O'Connell, who will be chief clerk to Cap- 
tain J. F. Blaine, assistant manager at Seattle. 
The action of the Pacific Coast Company in 
moving one of its most important departments 
away from San Francisco, has caused much 
comment in shipping circles. This latest move 
was presaged several months ago when the Pa- 
cific Coast Company decided to give its repair 
%\ork and outfitting contracts to northern con- 
cerns. As an excuse for having all its principal 
overhaul jobs done on the Sound, it was inti- 
mated that local bidders on contracts were less 
leasonable than their northern competitors. The 
present shakeup followed an investigation of the 
various departments by Eastern representatives. 

Colonel George W. Goethals. .Governor of the 
Panama Zone, announced on October 16 that it 
would be ten days before the canal would be 
ready for traffic, which has been sus'pended as a 
result of the landslide on the east side of the 
waterway, north of Gold Hill, on October 14. 
The Colonel said that he would have the channel 
readv for thirty-foot draft ships by October 27, 
barring accidents. It is planned by then to have 
the channel 100 feet wide and 30 feet deep along 
the west hank, where the channel was least af- 
fected. In that section there is an average depth 
of twenty feet. The slide was not as serious 
as at first reported, although it will require many 
months of constant dredging to regain the full 
width of 300 feet and the depth " of 45 feet. 
Captain Hugh Rodman, sunerintendent of trans- 
portation of the Panama Canal, already is pre- 
paring to put the maximum number of ships 
through on the first day the waterway is passa- 
ble. There are now fourteen ships anchored at 
the terminal points and others are coming. 



PILEMEN WANTED BY STATE HARBOR 
COMMISSION. 

The California State Civil Service Commission 
announces that applications for employment as 
nilemen in connection with the State Board of 
Harbor Commissioners in San Francisco will be 
received at the office of the Commission, State 
Capitol. -Sacramento, on or before October 31, 
1914. The salary is .$5 per day. There are now 
several vacancies to be filled. 

Further information and application blanks 
may be secured from the State Civil Service 
Commission, State Capitol, Sacramento. .Appli- 
cations must be properly executed and filed with 
the Commission on or before October 31, in 
order to be considered for this examination. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearnv 
394. (Advt.) ■ 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
570 West Lake St.. Chicago, HI. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON. Mass., ly^A Lewis St. 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY. 51 South St. ' 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La.. 117 Decatur St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 101 S. Commerce St 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 227 Sansom St. 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE. Md., 802-804 S. Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 214 West St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA- HARBOR, O., 21 High St 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St 
N. TONA WANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day SL 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St., East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1185 W. Eleventh C!f 
CHICAGO, III., 445 La Salle AvI 
DETROIT. Mich.. 27 .lefferson Ave 
MTT,WATIKEE. Wis., ISlReed St 
STTPERTOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St 
OOnENRRURG, N. Y 70 Isabella «!t 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Avl ^*- 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2296. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 West Ninth St 
Mn.WAIIKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St 
CFTTCAGO, III., 406 N. Clark St ' 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St.' 
TOI,RnO. O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 East Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON. Mich., 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT, O.. 922 Day St 
OGDENSRTIRG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St 
N. TON.\WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St 
STTPERTOR. Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
RAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 
ERIE. Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VICTORIA, R. C, 518 Yates St. 
VANCOUVER B C, 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 

"2,^"i?^ ^"'^ Main. P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703 
TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th gf /"'^'"""'^ »'"■»• 
SIOATTLR, W.Tsh., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6 
I'ORTT.AND, Ore.. 44 Union Ave., Box 2100 
EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P, O, Box 64 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67 
HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 

P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 1 Six months - - 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1914. 



STATUS OF THE SEAMEN'S BILL. 



Congress is going to adjourn very soon — 
and the Seamen's bill is still awaiting final 
action. 

In October of last year a satisfactory 
measure, known as the La Follette Seamen's 
bill (S. 136), passed the Senate. In the 
regular course of events the La Follette bill 
went to the House and remained in one of 
the pigeon-holes of the Committee on Mer- 
chant Marine and Fisheries until August of 
this year. An amended bill, known as the 
Alexander substitute, was then reported out 
of the committee and adopted in the House 
by an almost unanimous vote. 

The bill then went back to the Senate and 
after the House amendments were non-con- 
curred in it was referred to a Conference 
Committee. 

On the following day the motion to refer 
to conference was reconsidered and the bill 
went back to the Committee on Commerce — 
to the very committee room from which it 
started last October on its round trip in the 
Capitol. 

The Democratic Text-book, just issued for 
the purpose of furnishing ammunition to par- 
tisan newspapers and Congressional candi- 
dates on the Democratic ticket, takes it for 
granted that the Seamen's bill will pass. It 
is referred to twice in that booklet ; one ref- 
erence being the query, "Would you repeal 
it?" and another appearing under the asser- 
tive caption, "The Titanic Lesson Heeded !" 

In the meantime, however, time is rolling 
along, and the Seamen's bill, having made 
one complete round trip through the halls, 
chambers and committee rooms of the build- 
ing known as the National Capitol, is again 
anchored in first port of entry. 

Hence we repeat the old time-worn appeal : 
"Now is the time to act for all who believe in 
freedom for seamen and in effective legisla- 
tion for safety of life at sea." 

Of course, we fully realize that the public 
as well as the seamen have become rather 
skeptical upon the whole subject; they have 



heard that old war-cry at such regular in- 
tervals until the)' have grown tired and weary 
in the long wait for this much needed leg- 
islation. 

The public has learned that political prom- 
ises are not necessarily followed by perform- 
ances, and it is no longer a secret that one 
record disaster of the sea may follow another 
without creating more than a mere ripple in 
authoritative quarters. 

But the public and the seamen should never 
for a moment forget that this struggle for the 
emancipation of seamen and this fight for 
greater safety of life at sea has been made 
against tremendous odds. 

All "the interests," vested and otherwise, 
have moved every means, both fair and foul, 
to defeat or at least delay that kind of legis- 
lation. And the tortuous course of the Sea- 
men's bill during this session of Congress, a 
Congress which is generally recognized as 
far superior to any of its predecessors for 
many years past, is in itself sufficient to 
demonstrate the hidden jiower and the secret 
influence that is at work against the bill. 

At this late day it would seem useless and 
needless to re-submit any of the many con- 
clusive arguments that are available. But — 
personal letters to the respective Senators 
will to some degree oflFset the constant pres- 
sure from the other side, and remind the 
solons that the Seamen's bill is the people's 
bill. 

Will you help? 



INDUSTRIAL FREEDOM? 



The chief apostle of "industrial freedom," 
i. e., freedom to scab and work for starva- 
tion wages, is "General" Harrison Gray 
Otis of the Los Angeles Times. How this 
variety of freedom works in practice was 
clearly and forcibly illustrated by the 
doughty "General" himself ' when he tes- 
tified before the Federal Commission on 
Industrial Relations in Los Angeles the 
other day. The following took place con- 
cerning the workers on the Times : 

"When the men have grievances," Otis said, 
"they come to us. If their grievance is just 
we .give way; if not, we talk them off their feet 
and they give way." 

"Who decides as to the justice of these griev- 
ances?" asked one of the Commissioners. 

"We do," said Otis, positively. 

A titter which swept the room was promptly 
suppressed. 

Otis insisted that his system of dealing with 
employes was superior to any other. 

"Reyond peradventure of a doubt it is better, 
and I know it," he declared. 

There we have it — real genuine omnipo- 
tence. No wonder that titter swept the 
room. It is only a step from the sublime 
to the ridiculous and even Open-Shop 
Los .Angeles finds itself unable to swallow 
all the theories of "freedom" to which the 
"General" has dedicated his life. 

No wonder the laugh was on Otis. In 
the language of the Sacramento Bee : "The 
divine right of Kings seemingly is not in 
it with the divine right of Otis !" 



LEST WE FORGET. 



The "Hon." William E. Humphrey, of 
Seattle, Wash., is again a candidate for Con- 
gress. It will be recalled that this statesman 
from Seattle has for years been the most 
faithful servant of the cheap-labor shipping 
interests in the House of Representatives. 

Two years ago two-thirds of his constitu- 
ents favored his retirement from public life, 
but he was returned to office by a very small 



plurality over his nearest competitor. Un- 
fortunately, it does not require a majority to 
be elected to Congress ; if it did, that corpora- 
tion server would have been eliminated long 
ago. 

Humphrey is a hold-over from Cannon 
regime. He is a reactionary of the type that 
knows no shame ; but there is grave danger 
that he will again succeed himself, there 
being no less than three candidates desirous 
of taking his place. 

The Journal makes no special plea for 
either of Humphrey's opponents, but we do 
earnestly appeal to all friends of progress, 
and to all the liberty-loving men and women 
who reside in Washington's F'irst Congres- 
sional District, to bestir themselves from 
•now until November 3, and put an end to 
the infamous public career of "Chinese" 
Humphrey ! 



'I'he United States Commissioner of Nav- 
igation has written a letter calling atten- 
tion to the requirements of the British 
Merchant Shipping act, providing that 
where a British vessel is transferred at any 
port out of British dominions any seaman 
belonging to it shall be discharged unless 
he consents in writing to complete the 
voyage. If a seaman is so discharged with- 
out his consent in writing he is entitled to 
full wages up to the time of discharge, and, 
in addition, at the expense of the master 
he must be returned either to the port 
from which he was shipped or to the coun- 
try to which he belongs or to some other 
port agreed to by the seaman. If the sea- 
man is the subject of a British possession 
he may be returned to a port in the United 
Kingdom. The German Seamen's Ordnung 
(paragraphs 72 and 76) provides that if the 
flag of a vessel is changed in a foreign port 
the seaman is entitled to one month's extra 
wages and either to be returned to the 
place where he shipped or to a sum of 
money deemed equivalent to paying for 
such return. These laws are the same in 
principle as section 16 of our Act of De- 
cember 21, 1898. Other nations have simi- 
lar laws. 



.According to recent advices from Aus- 
tralia the Marine Cooks, Bakers and Butch- 
ers' Association of Australasia and the 
Commonwealth Steamship Owners' Asso- 
ciation have entered into a three years' in- 
dustrial agreement dating from August 1. 
The rate of wages to be paid is as follows: 

Passenger vessels of over 4000 tons gross 
register: Chief cook, £16 a month; second 
cook. £10; extra second cook, £9 10s; third 
cook, £7 10s; ship's cook, £9; assistant ship's 
cook, £5 10s; steerage cook, £9; assistant 
steerage cooks, £5 10s; baker, £12; assistant 
bakers, £7 10s; butcher, £9; assistant butcher, 
£6 10s; sculleryman, £6 10s; assistant scullery- 
man, £4. 

Vessels of 4000 tons and under: Chief cook. 
£14 10s; second cook, £6 10s; third cook, £7 
10s: baker, £11; butcher, £8; sculleryman, 
£6 10s. 

Collier and cargo vessels: Cook, £11; assist- 
ant cook, £6. Extra payment to be made to 
galley staff if they have to work in port after 
5:30 p. ni., when there are no passengers on 
board, and if they have to work in port after 
6:30 p. m. when there are passengers on board, 
at the rate of Is. per hour per man. 



Not "What has posterity done for us?" but 
"What will posterity do to us?" is the ques- 
tion that statesmanship may well consider in 
its treatment of the child labor evil. 



Incessant Labor organization is the price 
of industrial democracy. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DELEGATES' REPORT. 



San Francisco, CaL, Oct. 13, 1914. 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

Comrades: — Your delegates to the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor herewith 
report that we have attended the sessions 
of the Fifteenth Annual Convention of that 
body at Stockton, October 5-10 inckisive. 

There were pre'sent 258 delegates repre- 
senting 147 affiliated local unions and city 
central bodies, also fraternal delegates from 
the State Building Trades Council of Cali- 
fornia and the Women's Union Label 
League of Stockton. During the session 
fraternal greetings were exchanged with 
the State Federation of Labor of Arizona, 
then in convention at Phoenix. 

The convention was welcomed by the 
mayor, who has earned the esteem and 
gratitude of the working people for the 
fair manner in which the city government 
has acted during the lockout in progress in 
that city, and for his efforts to effect a 
settlement of the difficulty. Addresses 
were also delivered by Rev. Bird and Edi- 
tor Martin, of the Stockton Record, both 
of whom have publicly espoused the cause 
of the locked-out men and women. 

In addition to the reports of officers, the 
General Organizer and the delegate to the 
1913 convention of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, 40 resolutions were presented 
to and acted upon by the convention. The 
reports of the officers show a decided prog- 
ress both in point of increase of member- 
ship and improvement of working condi- 
tions in nearly every part of the State. 
The report of the Secretary-Treasurer states 
that, in spite of dull times and prevalent 
unemployment, and determined organized 
opposition from the employers in many lo- 
calities, the paid-up membership has in- 
creased from 67,000 to 69,000 during the 
year. The following statistical informa- 
tion gives an idea of the growth of the 
Federation : 

In- 

1909. 1914. crease. 

Paid-up membership 25.000 69,000 44,000 

No. of affiliated locals 151 562 411 

No. of city central bodies.. 11 18 7 

The income of the Federation during 
the year was $7,960.12, and its expenses 
$7,774.83. 

The work of the Federation is along two 
lines ; first, promoting the passage of legis- 
lation in the interest and for the protection 
of the men and women who work ; second, 
to strengthen and further organization in 
all fields of labor. 

In accordance with the precedent set in 
the State campaign of 1912, the Executive 
Council of the State Federation has again 
conducted a campaign of publicity for the 
purpose of assisting in the election of good 
men to represent the people in Congress 
and in the State Legislature. The method 
employed is to publish and distribute the 
records of the various aspirants for office 
as compiled by the legislative committee 
of the American Federation of Labor and 
of the State Federation. However, as this 
means does not reach those who have not 
before served the public in an official ca- 
pacity there has been instituted the addi- 
tional method of questioning candidates as 
to their attitude on certain important and 
live questions of the day. Ten such ques- 
tions were submitted to candidates for 
U. S. Senate and the House of Representa- 
tives, and twelve other questions were 



asked of candidates for the State Legisla- 
ture. The result was gratifying because it 
clearly put every candidate on record in 
some particular form. Even the fact that 
a candidate refuses to answer, implies his 
possible indifference or opposition to the 
subject-matter of the questions. The result 
of the questioning was published through- 
out the State both before and after the 
primaries, and has already accomplished 
the elimination of several bad actors. A 
pamphlet, containing these replies, entitled : 
"What They Promise to Do For Labor," 
will be extensively distributed within the 
next few weeks and the labor press will 
publish the parts thereof affecting the re- 
spective sections of the State. 

The Executive Council submitted the 
drafts of several bills covering legislation 
recommended by the last convention. In 
addition the Council presented a report on 
the amendments to the State Constitution 
and other referendum and initiative proposi- 
tions to be voted upon by the people next 
November, intended to advise the working 
people relative to such of these measures 
as particularly affect their interests. The 
Convention approved the recommendations 
of the committee, except upon Constitu- 
tional Amendment No. 99 (proposition No. 
44 on the ballot), which proposes to au- 
thorize the Legislature to enact minimum 
wage law for women and minors, and to 
enact any and all legislation which it shall 
deem necessary for the protection of any 
and all employes ; the intent of the latter 
provision being to prohibit the courts from 
declaring so-called labor measures uncon- 
stitutional. The convention, after a spir- 
ited debate, went on record as being op- 
posed to the amendment, believing it to 
be a dangerous move to entrust the gov- 
ernment with power to regulate wages ; 
also that it would be unwise to entrust 
the Legislature with unlimited power to 
enact legislation in all matters concerning 
labor. The most vigorous opposition to 
the Amendment came from the organized 
women. 

A list of these propositions and action 
thereon by the convention is appended to 
this report. 

The convention also declared in favor of 
extending the provisions of the Workmen's 
Compensation Act to occupational diseases; 
inspection of bake shops; and increased 
protection to miners and other employes 
in extra hazardous employments. Appeal 
to Congress for the extension of the Chi- 
nese Exclusion Act so as to embrace in its 
scope, Japs, Hindus and all other Asiatics 
was also ordered. A resolution introduced 
by the Maritime delegation renewing peti- 
tions to Congress for the passage of legis- 
lation sought by the seamen, was adopted. 

Owing to the lockout instituted in Stock- 
ton by an organization of employers, call- 
ing itself the Merchants, Manufacturers 
and Employers' Association (formerly 
known as the Citizens' Alliance), organiz- 
ing work by the Federation in other local- 
ities had to be neglected during the year. 
This struggle has been on since last March, 
and has been waged with unexampled sav- 
agery and brutality on the part of the em- 
ployers and with dogged determination on 
the part of the workers. From affecting 
more than two-thirds of the organized 
workers of the city, the lockout has grad- 
ually been narrowed down to one-third, 
• (Continued on Page 11.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 1914. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. Ellison presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping dull. The number of men around the 
hall is increasing. Delegates to the California 
State Federation of Labor convention submitted 
their report, which is printed in full in this issue 
of the Journal. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 19, 1914. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Jack Rosen presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. A Constitutional Amendment, 
relating to the election of ofticers, was intro- 
duced and referred to a vote of the Coast. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 12, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
518 Yates St. Phone 1325. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 12, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slack. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 12, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 12, 1914. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 12, 1914. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 12, 1914. 
.Shipping and prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 44 Union Ave. North. Tel. 
East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 12, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 13, 1914. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
1281^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 5, 1914. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 15, 1914. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slack. The full Shipwreck 
Benefit was ordered paid to one member wrecked 
on the schooner "W. H. Dimond" off the Alaska 
coast. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 8, 1914. 
-Shipping very slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. Box No. 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 7, 1914. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; prospects un- 
certain. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



DIED. 

The following members are reported as having 
perished in the wreck of the steamer "KarUik" 
in the Arctic, in the fall of 1913: 

Charles Baker, No. 1831, a native of Argen- 
tine, age 35. 

John Brady, No. 1902, a native of England, 
age 26. 

Edmund Jackson, No. 2197, a native of India, 
age 28. 

Thomas Stanley Morris, No. 1866, a native of 
England, age 31. 

Hugh Williams, No. 1238, a native of England, 
age 26. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



NOTES FROM DENMARK. 



The following is a translation of the min- 
utes of a special meeting held by the Marine 
Firemen's Union in Denmark for the purpose 
of providing aid for the members uncm|)loyed 
by reason of the war in Euroj^e, and also to 
make provision for reasonable compensation 
for the risks run by members in certain 
trades, owing to the war. 

The minutes are given in full, because they 
are fairly descriptive of conditions affecting 
the seafaring craft resulting from the tremen- 
dous conflict now waging in Europe. 

As announced in our recent issue, war has 
broken out between England, Russia, France, 
Belgium, Servia and Japan, on the one side, 
and Germany and Austria, on the other. 
This war, of course, has deeply affected the 
means of livelihood, not alone in the war- 
ring countries, but in the other countries of 
Europe, among the latter also Denmark, 
^faritime business has suffered most seri- 
ously, and as a consequence a number of ves- 
sels have been laid up indefinitely, and many 
of our members have been thrown out of 
employment. 

To consider means of providing support 
for these members, a special general assembly 
was convened Thursday, August 13. An- 
other question which was discussed was the 
demand made by the firemen in steamers trad- 
ing to Briti-sh ports in view of the extra 
hazardous conditions to navigation in the 
North Sea, due to the mines sowed by the 
German navy. After negotiations, wages 
were raised from 70 kr. to 140 kr. per month, 
with a guarantee of 4000 kr. to the heirs in 
case of death resulting from any accident 
caused by the war. 

The presiding officer welcomed tlic mem- 
bers in attendance and stated that at his re- 
quest Mr. Peter Hedelxil, Secretary of the 
"Samvirkende Fagforbund" (Federation of 
Labor), was present. 

The chairman explained the result of ne- 
gotiations with the shipowners, in Esbjerg. 
for improvement in wages in vessels trading 
to British ports, and stated that he oonsidered 
the results obtained satisfactory. He also 
explained that he had gone to Esbjerg on the 
request of the Social-democratic party's busi- 
ness manager, in order to effect a settlement 
of the strike there pending. It was the desire 
of the Social-democratic party that any in- 
dustrial conflict that might result in injury 
to the country generally should be avoided 
during the progress of the war. A number 
of prominent gentlemen also took part in 
the negotiations. The result was as already 
.stated. This report was received with con- 
siderable satisfaction on the part of the mem- 
bers present. 

The chairman further stated that owing 
to the fact that the wholesale coal dealers 
had broken their contracts, and now de- 
manded 100 per cent increase in the price 
of coal, which they had bought at rates pre- 
vailing before the war and before the im- 
port of coal had stopped, the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Union had determined that the 
firemen also should take the opportunity to 
obtain a share of the tremendous earnings of 
the wholesale coal dealers. T'^nr this reason 
notice had been given the .\ssociation of Coal 
Importers and the Danish Shipowners' Asso- 
ciation abrogating the existing agreement, 
with a demand for a general increase of 
wages. The dangerous condition of naviga- 
tion was made the ground for demanding 
compensation for the widows and children. 
in case of accidental death. 



Secretary Hedebol was then granted the 
floor. He stated that the present situation 
must be viewed from the background of the 
frightful catastrophe which now threatens 
luirope from the almost general war. We 
hope that we shall succeed in preserving the 
l>eace for Denmark, and that the present gov- 
ernment which has every qualification for ac- 
complishing ■ this mission, may remain in 
power. No one can tell, however, whether 
we shall be permitted to keep neutral. But. 
under all conditions, the war will have a 
crushing effect upon our economic life, espe- 
cially our maritime trade. Trade to Germany 
and Russia is at a standstill. Our trade to 
Great Britain and on the Mediterranean, as 
well as East Asia is uncertain and may be 
stopped at any time. Great unemployment 
will result in this countr\', because we shall 
be imable to import raw material for our 
factories. Under these conditions society 
generally is in feverish excitement, and we 
organized workers must be careful not to 
arouse a jniblic sentiment against us ; this 
would seriously injure our cause. 

But, the seamen have the right to demand 
reasonable compensation for the dangers sur- 
rounding their calling at this time, especially 
from the mines adrift in the North Sea. At 
the same time I would recommend self-con- 
trol and careful consideration in this threat- 
ening crisis, and it seems important to me 
that the Executive Board should have the 
right unhampered to take the steps necessary 
in each given emergency. We should espe- 
cially consider the peculiar character of the 
export of our farm products, the importance 
of which can not be exaggerated, and w-hich, 
if it should be stopped, will be the ruin of the 
country. For the present, the marine firemen 
will suffer greatly from unemployment in 
common with the men of all other crafts, and 
the State and municipal governments should 
at once take steps to deal with this situation. 
The Workingmen's party will do all in its 
pow-er to promote this work. 

The present situation is, as we all know, 
anything but encouraging; it demands com- 
mon sense and self control in us all, in order 
that a public resentment may not be aroused 
against any part of the organized labor move- 
ment. It is necessary that we do not act 
so as to give the anti-labor forces in this 
country the opportunity they are looking for 
to defeat the present government and to 
injure the cause of labor, the marine firemen 
included. 

The chairman extended the thanks of the 
assembly to Mr. Hedebol, and promised on 
its behalf to exercise the greatest caution ; 
consistent with a demand that the wholesale 
coal dealers deliver a part of their booty to 
the firemen. The Coal Dealers' Association 
has broken its contracts with its customers 
and we demand our proper share. The de- 
manded increase is only intended to last as 
long as the war. 

The Workmen's party has made an offer 
to assist us in our negotiations with the ship- 
owners ; they have already assisted us in the 
negotiations concluded in Esbjerg, and we 
are still working together with the party to 
seek an adjustment of conditions. 

P.-WMENT OF BENEFITS TO MEMBERS Ol'T OF 
EMPLOYMENT. 

The Chairman : The Executive Committee 
has considered the matter of paying out-of- 
work benefit; but. as is known, we have 
recently enacted a rule which provides that 
no more than 3 kr. can be paid each member 
per week. This provision has been repealed 



as far as the Executive Board is concerned. 
The reason why we have been compelled to 
delay payment of benefits is that we desired 
the General Assembly to indorse the action 
of the board. 

The chairman further stated that when out- 
of-work benefit is being paid, the members 
receiving same are in duty bound to accept 
such employment as is offered them. 

C. C. Sorensen proposed that out-of-work 
benefit be fixed at 12 kr. jjer week, regardless 
of whether the member was married or the 
number of children. 

Svend Svendsen also favored that like 
provisions should be made for married and 
single members, but advocated payment of 1 
kr. extra for each child. 

Martin Jensen proposed that the rate be 
fixed at 12 kr. per week for all, with a little 
extra for each child. 

Dyrberg recommended that payment should 
not exceed 14 kr. per week. The chairman 
.supported the latter proposition. It was 
determined as follows : Out-of-w ork benefit 
will be paid to married and single members, 
12 kr. per week; families with one child will 
receive 13 kr. ; for two children, 14 kr., but 
the maximum shall be 14 kr. per w-eek. 

The chairman then stated that out-of-work 
benefit would be paid each sixth day, and 
made the inquiry as to how long a member 
must have been in the Union in order to be 
entitled to such benefit. He answered his 
(|uestion by proposing that such benefit be 
l)aid to all regardless of the length of mem- 
bership. This motion was adopted unan- 
imously with the understanding that no new 
members would be accepted during the period 
in which out-of-work benefit should be paid. 

The chairman then explained that refusal 
to accept employment offered would forfeit 
the right to support, and such members as 
Iiavc been idle a long period before the war 
broke out were also excluded from this pro- 
vision. If any member shall consider that 
he has been unfairly treated, he has, of 
course, the right to appeal his case to the 
Executive Board and from that body to the 
General Assembly. 

Svend Svendsen : If a man is at outs with 
the chief engineer is it intended that he shall 
be compelled to accept employment with such 
chief engineer? The Chairman: No. 

The motion was unanimously adopted. 

It was further resolved that the treasurer 
sliall only pay out-of-work benefit, and that 
idle members shall be required to report daily, 
and their reports shall be received each alter- 
nate day by the chairman, the treasurer and 
the business agent. If these three can not 
provide the necessary control for the unem- 
ployed, the Executive Committee may employ 
other members to assist them. 

The chairman further explained the ar- 
rangements made for keeping daily control 
and reports of the unemployed members, as 
well as the system for keeping proper account 
between the Union and the members. 

It was further determined that benefit shall 
be paid as follows: For the first week of 
idleness, no payment shall be made ; for the 
second week payment shall be made, but not 
until the week is complete. Those who are 
now entitled to benefit will receive the first 
I)ayment next Saturday. 

The chairman further explained that the 
vessels owned by Brix-Hansen's firm had 
been struck, because of the refusal of that 
company to comply with the demanded in- 
crease in wages. This was unanimously in- 
dorsed by the assembly. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ONE MAN'S VIEWS. 



It is not easy to be patient with those 
workingmen and women who oppose mini- 
mum wage legislation. Their line of reason- 
ing is so inept and palpably out of plumb as 
to raise the suspicion that those who pursue 
it suffer from mental strabismus, or else wil- 
fully seek to becloud a perfectly plain prop- 
osition. 

What would you say if we seamen were to 
oppose ourselves to legislation providing for 
a minimum scale of provisions and a mini- 
mum forecastle space? Why, you would 
probably say — and be quite right in saying so, 
too — that we were a parcel of overgrown 
dunderheads, knowing, as we do, the tradi- 
tional proclivities of shipowners in those di- 
rections. And yet the board and lodgings 
provided for seamen on board a ship is 
wages just as much as is the actual cash 
paid them for their services. 

Now, Mr. Worker, please get this into 
your nut : 

A legally established minimum wage will 
leave you as free as you now are to wrest 
from your employer as much higher a wage 
as the strength of your organization will 
permit you to. 

A legally established minimum wage is not 
an immutable wage. A wage commission will 
have full control of the matter. Labor will 
have a representation in the body of the 
commission equally witli the employers. 
Whenever the minimum wage is proven in- 
adequate to the needs of the workers the 
commission is empowered to increase it to 
adequacy. 

A legally established mininnun wage, 
wherever it has been tried, has proved itself 
an unqualified success. In none of the States 
or countries where it is now in actual opera- 
tion have the workers evinced anything but 
appreciation of the plan. Let their experi- 
ence teach you. 

Of course, when we get the co-operative 
commonwealth we shall not need either mini- 
mum wage or eight-hour legislation. But 
we live under the capitalistic regime now, 
and — well, as the ancients said, when you're 
in Rome do as the Romans do. If you want 
anything from capitalism you'll have to fight 
it, like the devil, with its own weapons. And 
the weapons of capitalism, as we all know, 
is constitutional law and order — as duly made, 
provided and construed by capitalism itself. 
See the point, brother? If you don't, pass 
on and God be with you. You'll need His 
help badly. 



Some means must be found, and that 
soon, to shorten the official ballot, or 
nothing on earth will save direct legisla- 
tion from the wrath to come of an exas- 
perated electorate. Reducing a thing to 
an absurdity is about the surest Avay to 
kill it. And that's just what we are doing 
here in California, reducing direct legisla- 
tion to an absurditv. Can you imagine 
what would be said of a trade union or 
other organization of individuals which 
should submit for the serious consideration 
and decision of its membership forty odd 
propositions at one lick? 

It would be far better to have an elec- 
tion every week and handle one proposition 
at a time. In that way the electors would 
at least be able to exercise their powers of 
concentration to some purpose should they 
so choose. And without due concentration 



and deliberation on the part of the electors 
no public question can be intelligently dis- 
posed of. 



Last month the market quotations on pick- 
handles broke all previous records in this 
State. Rumor has it that several large and 
thriving municipalities have laid in an extra 
plentiful .'iupply in anticipation of tlie ex- 
pected invasi(Mi this coming winter of great 
armies of unemployed and starving men. 
Whether this move has some connection with 
])ast experiences, or is merely the outcome 
of reading Mr. Roosevelt's essays on "Pre- 
paredness for \\"ar," is not .stated. However, 
abstractions like these do not, as a rule, 
interest homeless, starving men. The very 
exigencies of their plight make them pecu- 
liarly close students of the concrete facts of 
life. And a hardwood pickhandle in the 
hand of a drunken deputy sheriff is about as 
concrete a fact as even a down and out, lui- 
employed man would want to bump up 
atrainst. 



Public exhibitions of war films are stren- 
uously objected to by capitalism. Films 
altogether too realistic. Viewing them 
might tend to make us all anti-militarists. 
^^'hat then would become of capitalism? 
Capitalism and militarism stand and fall 
together. They are like a pair of holdui) 
men on the job. Militarism is the cha]> 
v.ho holds a gun to your head while the 
(itlier fellow goes through your pockets. 
Fine, profitable game this capitalistic civil- 
ization of our.s — for the holdup men. 



The people of California are going to try 
mighty hard this coming election to make 
old John P)arleycorn walk the plank. How 
alxnit it, bo ; are you with us on that propo- 
sition ? You know, and I know, that the old 
scoundrel is no good, and never was. He's 
])ut enough good men on the bum to make 
Satan's eft'orts in that line look amateurish. 
Now let's call the turn on him. 'Raus mit 
John Barleycorn, fellows ; and may the devil 
have mercv on his soul. 



IMurder! Another good man gone wrong. 
William Randolph Hearst, the greatest living 
])cace apostle at large, is now advocating the 
founding of "twenty more West Points," so 
that in our next war we may not suffer from 
a shortage of military officers like the Ger- 
mans and English are now doing. In the 
immortal words of that great American, E. 
Pluribus Unum, wadda vou know about that? 



How Plearst nnist be kicking himself be- 
cause he didn't think of that "Christmas 
shi])" scheme before ]Mike de Young did. 



Have you heard yet of old High Co.st of 
Living taking anything like a tumble to him- 
self because of our "bumper crops"? 



"Live and learn" would not do as a 
motto for Roosevelt. He could never live 
wn to it. 



A historic saying brought up to date — 
O, that mine enemy would run for public 
office !' 



The People never give up their liberties 
l)ut midcr some delusion. — Burke. 

F. H, I'lkvicsoM. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT, 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 
BR.\NCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFF.VLO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVET.AND, 1401 "W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MIT.WAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAT CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG,' N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS : 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 
BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND. 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR. WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

B.\Y CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

55 Main St., Buffalo, N. V. 

Telephone Seneca 2295. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, II,L 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 
CFIICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS: 
Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. M.Trquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven. Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Grren Bay, Mich. .'Saginaw, Mich. 

U'.ighton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

i.viflington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan. Wis. 

Krle, Pa. ."Superior, Wis. 

Mfnomlnee, MIcb. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



"ieasf)n;il)le ground to Ijelieve" that the de- 
fendants Iiad \'iolated the injunction. The 
three lawyers had served as prosecutors of 
tlie trade unionists in the first case. 

Thus ends the official career of "Judge" 
Daniel Thcw Wright, for it is current topic 
that he will never be a candidate for an 
elective office and that no President or 
Goxernor would appoint him to one. 



Settling Labor Disputes. 

Of 4.^66 disputes in the New York in- 
dustry, filed under the terms of a protocol 
between employer and employe, 98 per 
cent, were settled by mediation — that is, 
without the assistance of third parties, ac- 
cording to a bulletin CNo. 145) on "Concil- 
iation, arbitration and sanitation in the 
clothing industry in New York." issued by 
the United States Department of I^abor. 

The bulletin says : 

"'I'he growth of the protocol idea in the 
clothing industry constitutes a great ad- 
vance toward a practical method for the 
settlement of industrial disputes. The first 
protocol. ado])ted in 1910 in the Xew York 
cloak, suit, and skirt industry, benefited, 
by the peaceful settlement of grievances, 
.some .50,000 people. This was followed in 
the early months of 1913 by six new pro- 
tocols in New York and Boston, aiifecting 
about 65,000 people. 

"The principal features of the protocol 
idea are conciliation and arbitration through 
a board of grievances and a board of arbi- 
tration, sanitary control through a joint 
board, preferential union shop, minimum 
wage standards, determination of piece 
prices, and prohibition of home work and 
subcontracting. Strong organization of the 
])arties to the protocol, both employers and 
employes, and control of the rank and file 
of each side are recognized in each agree- 
ment as necessary for its success. 

■"When a dispute arises between employ- 
er and employe, the aggrieved party must 
bring his complaint to the board of griev- 
ances through bis own organization, name- 
ly, the Dress and Wai.st Manufacturers' 
Association, in the case of employers, or 
the International Garment Workers' l^n- 
ion. in the case of employes. Two deputy 
clerks, one representing each side, first in- 
vestigate and try to adjust the complaint. 
Failing adjustment by the deputies, cases 
are next carried to the chief clerks, and if 
not settled by them, to the board of griev- 
ances or the wage scale board. .\s a final 
resort, they may be carried to the arbitra- 
tion board, which is the supreme court of 
the industry. 

"The great majority of the cases were 
settled by the deputy clerks and chief 
clerks, only 2 per cent, of union com- 
plaints, and less than 5 per cent, of the 
employers' complaints being appealed to 
the board of grievances, while in only two 
cases was it necessary to carry appeals to 
the board of arbitration." 



Glenn Martin, the aviator, .says that the 
fate of Europe will be determined by the 
work of the aeroplanes. Probably the 
horseshoer believes that the winning factor 
v.'ill be the well-shod cavalry horses. — Kan- 
sas City Journal. 



FARMERS AND THE 8-HOUR DAY. 

By THO.M.\S \V. \VII.LLA.MS. 

The chief and persistent objection to the 
eight-hour day is that it is impossible to 
ada])t the diversified business interests and 
particularly farm work to an eight-hour 
basis. 

This objection comes from the large 
ranch, owners who exploit labor, the land 
speculators, and all Big Business interests. 

The big exploiting rancher hires men at 
small wages for long hours. He owns the 
most improved machinery. He can thus 
make larger profits than the small rancher. 
.\n eight-hour day will take away this ad- 
vantage. 

The small rancher who does his own 
work, assisted by his family, and who em- 
ploys only occasional help or, at the most, 
one or two hands, has nothing whatever 
to lose from the pas.sage of this law. 

The United States Cen.sus Report of 
1*^10 shows that the farmers of the country 
received $6,000,000 for their farm products, 
yet the consumer paid $15,000,000. Big 
Business took $9,000,000 and gave the farm- 
ers $6,000,000. 

The Santa Fe Railroad is paying divi- 
dends on $240,000,000 of watered stock. 
The Southern Pacific is paying dividends 
on $500,000,000. The farmer pays most of 
these dividends. This accounts for the 
Publicity Fund to defeat the Eight-Hour 
Law. 

The farmer is gouged coming and going. 
He pays $125 for a binder for which labor 
received only $19 to produce. He pays $90 
for a top buggy: labor received $8.10. The 
farmer pays the Trust $.50 for a sewing 
machine, for which labor was paid $3.25. 

It is estimated that the proceeds of the 
State agriculturally are : 

Cattle, horses, sheep and swine $ 77,584,.'?0O 

Dairy products 34,95n,5.=;2 

Eggs and fowls 18,205.896 

Cereals, hay, potatoes and sugar beets 126.516.800 
Orchard and vineyard products 114,513,120 

Total $371,770,668 

The Bulletin of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture shows that Cali- 
fornia spends yearly only $50,000,000 for 
farm labor. According to the above statis- 
tics, acknowledged by the Farmers and 
Fruitgrowers' Federation, out of a total 
agricultural receipt of the entire State 
amounting to $371,770,668, labor received 
only $50,000,000, or a little more than one- 
eighth of the entire product. 

The consumers of the State of California 
pay from $2.07 per 100 pounds for fourth- 
class freight, to $3.40 per 100 pounds for 
first-class freight, and .$8..50 per 100 pounds 
for two and one-half times first-class 
freight, from Chicago points. The Jap- 
anese and Chinese .shippers have the same 
goods, without re.gard to cubic measure- 
ment, class or commodity, laid down in any 
one of their home ports for a flat rate of 
$1.50 per 100 pounds. 

The small farmers of California are not 
making any money. This is due, not to 
the wages paid to the hired man, nor yet 
the hours which he works, but to the ex- 
orbitant freight rates and the enormous 
.graft of the commission merchants. 

The duty of the smalf farmer is to recog- 
nize that each day makes his interests 
more and more identical with those of his 
hired help, and the necessity of co-operat- 
ing with the workers of California in de- 



stroying the octopus which is absorbing the 
interests of both. 

We must destroy railroad monopoly. 
\\'e must establish State produce exchanges 
all over the State. 

The farmers are producing more now 
than they can dispose of at remunerative 
prices. 

.\n eight-hour day will benefit the work- 
ers in both country and city. It will bene- 
fit the small Inisiness man as well as the 
small farmer. It will destroy the profits 
of the large ranchers, the land speculators, 
the Big Business interests which flourish 
at the expense of the rest of society. 



THE STATE INSURANCE FUND. 



The operations of the State of California 
in the field of Compensation Insurance 
have been so successful that, on January 1, 
1915, barring any unusually serious and 
unexpected calamity, the State Compensa- 
tion Insurance Fund will be prepared to 
allow a return of premium to its policy 
holders equalling 15% of earned premiums 
and distributed in percenta.ges ranging 
from 5% to 25% of premiums of employers 
in various hazards, depending upon the loss 
experience in the several groups. 

The third quarterly financial report of 
the "Fund" is given below, covering opera- 
tions during the first nine months: 

statement of September 30, 1914. 
(Covering nine (9) months' period, January 1 to 

September 30, 1914.) 
Appropriation, Chapter 

ISO, Statutes 1913 $100,000.00 

rromiums written, less 

premiums returned... 462,514.46 
(.i360 applications for 

insurance received) 
Interest received, due 

and accrued 4,502.80 

$567,017.26 

Expenses and salaries 

(9.37% of premiums). 41,328.31 

Compensation and Stat- 
utory Medical pay- 
ments 52,528.21 

(247S accident cases 
iiandled) 

• Estimated cost of 
outstanding Compen- 
sation and Statutory 
Medical Payments (see 
footnote) 110.456.28 

T^nearned Premiums... 138,«84.06 

$342,996.86 

Appropriation. Chapter 

isn. Statutes 1913 100,000.00 

.\rrumulatcd Surplus... 124,020.40 

Total Surplus 224,020.40 

$567,017.26 

• If the Statutory reserve for outstanding payments, 
required in annual report to Insurance Commissioner, 
were used, this item would be increased to $167,456.15. 

In 1913 the production of crude borate 
materials in the United States was 58,051 
short tons valued at $1,491,530, compared 
with 42,315 tons in 1912 valued at $1,127,- 
813, according to an advance chapter from 
Mineral Resources 1913 on the production 
of borax, now in press by the United States 
Geological Survey. All the borax in the 
United States is produced from ores de- 
rived from California, and mainly from a 
few mines in Inyo and Los Angeles coun- 
ties, although a small quantity was pro- 
duced in Ventura county. Thus far there 
has been no output of borax from the 
potash properties in the Searles Lake 
region, where the promoters expect to ob- 
tain borax as a by-product of the potash 
mining operations. The imports into the 
United States in 1913 of borax and borates 
were valued at $18,434 against $11,249 
in 1912. 



Supported entirely from a horse's collar, 
a new feed bag permits an animal to have 
the free use of its head. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



DELEGATES' REPORT. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



and at the time of this writing negotiations 
are pending for a general settlement. Re- 
cent exposures of the purposes and methods 
of the employers, as well as the willing- 
ness of the workers to submit their case 
to arbitration, have turned public senti- 
ment in favor of the latter; and the gener- 
ous support rendered by trades-unions 
throughout the State has also had its effect. 
An interesting feature of the struggle is 
the active part taken in it by the women of 
the city. 

Complying with the instructions of the 
convention, your delegates would urge that 
this union provide further financial aid for 
the men and women locked out, and thus 
do our share toward completing the good 
work. 

When the State Federation of Labor was 
organized in San Francisco, in 1901, it set 
out with the object of helping the workers 
in the smaller country towns to organize 
and thus equalize wages and working con- 
ditions in these towns with those prevail- 
ing in San Francisco. This work is al- 
most an accomplished fact. In most of the 
smaller towns the workers are as thorough- 
ly organized as in the large cities, and 
everything considered, their conditions are 
as good, and in many cases better than 
those of their brethren in the big cities. 

During the coming year further effort= 
will be made, by co-operation with the 
American Federation of Labor and organ- 
ized workers generally, to promote organ- 
ization of the so-called unskilled, migra- 
tory workers. There is a general realiza- 
tion that this is the most important prob- 
lem calling for solution. The legislation 
enacted recently in this State has helped 
to make the work easier because it has 
shown to the "migratories" that the organ- 
ized workers are interested in their cause 
and willing to assist in any manner possi- 
ble. 

One of the most interesting documents 
presented to the convention was the report 
of the delegate to the recent convention of 
the American Federation of Labor. We 
recommend the reading of that report by 
the busy unionist, as it describes in brief 
and concise form the trend of the American 
labor movement, its achievements in the 
recent past and its plans for the future. 

Practically all the incumbent officers 
were re-elected. Comrade Scharrenberg was 
honored by election as delegate to the 
Philadelphia convention of the American 
Federation of Labor. 

Santa Rosa was chosen as the place for 
the next meeting. 

In conclusion we wish to say that the 
work of the convention was marked by a 
fraternal and harmonious spirit, not a sin- 
gle roll call being demanded to settle any 
question, except as to election of officers. 
On this roll call your delegates, pursuing 
the established practice, cast the vote of 
the organization as a unit. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. Ellison, 
Harry Ohlsen, 
Paul Scharrenberg. 

APPENDIX. 
How Labor Stands on Measures. 

This is the attitude of the California 
State Federation of Labor upon initiatives, 
referendums and Constitutional Amend- 



ments pending before the people of Cali- 
fornia. The numbers indicate the re- 
spective position of the measures upon the 
ballot: 

VOTE "YES." 
3. Eight-hour law. 

5. Investment companies act. 

6. Water commission act. 

7. Local taxation exemption (Home 
Rule in Taxation). 

10. Abolition of Poll Tax. 

11. University of California Building 
Act. 

14. Voting ])y absent electors. 

16. Condemnation for public purposes, 
etc. 

23. Elections by plurality, preferential 
vote, etc. 

3.S. Sacramento State building bonds. 

36. San Francisco State building act. 

37. State Fair grounds. 

38. Los Angeles State building bonds. 
48. San Francisco harbor improvement 

act of 1913. 

VOTE "NO." 
2. Prohibition. 

13. Qualifications of voters at bond elec- 
tions. 

44. Women's and minors' minimum 
wage. 



LO, THE POOR CORRESPONDENT! 



Doubtless, if one but knew, the fevered 
daily newspapers deserve as much sympa- 
thy as blame in their present attempt to 
report the war for a bloodthirsty nation oi 
peace-lovers. Let them take heart, how- 
ever, for one of their brethren, on the 
New York Evening Post, has taken pity 
on them. He has constructed for them a 
cast-iron, indestructible, hammerless, in- 
controvertible cable dispatch, such as may 
be used time and again, with varying 
head-lines, and such as will satisfy all 
readers, including all foreign born, includ- 
ing the German-Americans : 

Paris, or Brussels, or Berlin (as the case 
may be). — Another notable victory over 
the enemy was scored by ' a French (or 
Belgian or German) infantry regiment at 
a point somewhere between Iceland and 
Sicily. Our troops were outnumbered four 
to one, but our guns carried four times as 
far as the enemy's artillery and fired four 
times as fast. They retired with a loss of 
six thousand men. Our own losses are 
three men killed and seven wounded, owing 
entirely to revolting treachery on the part 
of the enemy. After a desperate encounter 
the country was cleared of the enemy. 
Prisoners report that the enemy has no 
stomach for fighting. Bridges thrown 
across the river were repeatedly shattered 
by our artillery. This makes our victory 
over the enemy twenty miles this side of 
the river all the more remarkable. Ma- 
neuvering skilfully between a mountain 
and a river, both of which, we assure our 
readers, are to be found in any respectable 
atlas, our men made repeated charges 
through the corn-fields and well beyond 
into the vineyards which recur at regular 
intervals between Rotterdam and Lisbon. 
Similar victories are reported from along 
the entire front, which we can go so far 
as to say is facing the enemy without ven- 
turing to specify where the enemy is. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone, 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SE.\TTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTL.\ND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, "Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
.nny of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Westralian Labor Government 
is arranging to provide work at the 
State sawmills for men made idle on 
account of the closing of private 
mills through the war. 

The New South Wales Govern- 
ment has proposed that all Govern- 
ment employes with salaries of over 
£300 a year should contribute 10 per 
cent, of the amount above £200 to 
find employment for those displaced 
by the war. 

The Common Council of Danville, 
Ills., not only gave the organized 
workers the e.xclusivc use of Lincoln 
Park on Labor Day, but also ap- 
proved of a donation of $200 to 
cover part of the expense of the 
celebration. 

The Missouri State Federation of 
Labor adopted resolutions appealing 
to President Wilson, the warring 
nations and the civilized world to 
do all in their power for interna- 
tional peace and the permanent sus- 
pension of the European war. 

President Berry, of the Interna- 
tional Printing Pressmen and Assist- 
ants' Union, announces that a con- 
tract carrying wage increases has 
been entered into between the press- 
men's organization and the Baltimore 
American and Star newspapers. For 
the first time in their history, these 
papers are now thoroughly organized. 
The Hospital Nurses' and Attend- 
ants' Union, consisting of employes 
of the State institution in Kankakee, 
Ills., is increasing in numbers and 
effectiveness. This organization is 
chartered by the A. F. of L., as are 
similar organizations in Dunning and 
F.lgin, which are intended to assure 
reasonable wages, and hours, and 
decent treatment. 

The House of Representatives has 
raised wages in the Government 
Printing Office 5 cents an hour. Over 
600 men will be affected. The pre- 
vailing rate of wages is 50 cents 
an hour for printers and bookbinders 
and 55 cents an hour for a class of 
employes under the head of "com- 
positors." The amendment adopted 
puts them all in the same class at 55 
cents an hour. The rates for proof- 
readers, make-up men, linotype and 
monotype operators, stereotypcrs, 
electrotypers and pressmen in charge 
will be CO cents. 

A two years' agreement has been 
signed by horseshoers and their em- 
ployers in Evansville, Ind. No strike 
can be called or lockout enforced 
during the life of the contract, which 
provides for a nine-hour day and 
$3 per day for floormen and $3.25 
for firemen and fire and floormen. 
Overtime and Sunday work, 60 cents 
an hour. In the event of employers 
raising the price of horseshoeing, 
the minimum wage shall be $3.50 a 
day. Only members of the union are 
to be employed, .\rbitration and ap- 
prentice regulations are agreed to. 
The Canadian Trades and Labor 
Congress adopted a report of its im- 
migration committee advocating the 
exclusion of Asiatics from the Do- 
minion and urged legislation forbid- 
ding Asiatics now in the country to 
employ white female labor. The re- 
port also recommended, for the bet- 
ter regulation of immigration in Brit- 
ish possessions, the creation of a 
central board of the imperial govern- 
ment, with colonial representatives 
among its members. M. M. Donog- 
hue, of Butte, Montana, attended the 
convention as fraternal delegate from 
the American Federation of Labor. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 

DAY AND NIGHT 



PIER NO 1. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



EureKa, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ^ Hagan 

Proprietors 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



WESTERMAIV &. SCHERMER 



( 220-222 
Two Stores J 103-105-107 



SEATTLE, 



1st Ave. So. 
WASH. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to 
call or have their mall forwarded during 
that period, they should notify the Agent 
to hold mail until arrival. 

Abrahamosn. BernerMatson. Eric 
Allen, John McPherson, Robert 

Alonzo, J. MikkGlsen. K. -1620 

Anderson, A. -1821 Moen. Robert 
Andersen, RagnvaldMonson. Martin 
Aylward, J. Mulr, James 

Alfredsen, Andrew Muins. F. W. P. 
Albers, Geo. MuUer, Willie 

Anderson, Julius L. Maas, R 



BONNFY" WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

SEATTLE. WASH. 

Next door to Master Mates and Pilots 

Conducted by CAPT. H. S. SMITH, 

Who for four years was Assist. Ins. of 

Steamboats in Seattle 



H. H. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Fuinishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schuize 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Marx, Rhor\'ald 
McDonald. Wm. 
Manson, Sven 
Nelsen, Bernt 
Nielsen, H. J. 
Npss. T^ouis 
Ness. Carl 
Nielsen, P. Ij. 
Nashis, P. 
Norlin, Geo. 
Orstad. Christ 
Osterman, Oscar 
Olsen. B. -5n7 
Olson. C. -5S4 
Olsen, A. M. 
Olspn. Martin 
Olsen. O. P. -1141 
Paaso, A. 
Petterson. Harry 
Petersen. .Tohn 
Petersen. Olnf P,. 
Peterson. Victor 
Primrose. H. T/. 
0\ii-ley. R. E. 
Rasmussen. Ra.=mus 
Rasmussen. F. P. 
Rasmussen. Ol.ii 

Rohme. Otto 
Pohde. Fritz 

Rose. W. IT. 

Samuelsen. Huko 

Shepard. Peter 

SimmlnRbjem. O. 

Saunders. R. 

Stover. Harrv 

Stiihr. H. 

Rundberg. K. K. 

Svensen. Teii 

Samuelsen Harnld 
W. Smith, Taine 

Soderberir. A. 

Staff. C. 

Strand, C. 

Strauss. P 

Talhom. J. 

Thnrsen, Tone-er 

Thorsen. .ToViannos 

Thompson, Willie 
Trygve Totz, R. 

TaViHnPTi. M. 



Benter, Henry 

Bruce, Robert 

Bode, Fred 

Bye, Sigurd 

Backman, F. J. 

Bahr, Walter 

Brodie, W. G. 

Carlson, J. -861 

Campbell, Frank 

Daly. W. O. 

Dekkier, O. 

Die Christ O. 

D. M. 

Davis, F. A. 

ttoddy, C. W. 

Engstrom, Carl 

Engstrom. Carl 

Eriksen, C. 

Erikson, Erik 

Eriksen. John 

Fenes, Ing^•ald 

Foss, A. F. 

Frammis, Ivar 

Gardner. .Tames 

Gundersen. D. 

Geigor. Joe 

Graae. P. C. 

Hacklin. C. B. 

Hagstrom. Victor 

Haester. Otto 

Halversen. Hans 

Hansen, Nils -2072 

Helstrom, .1. A. 

Hansen, Henry 

Hellisen. H. 

Herman. Axel 

Hager. P. B. 

.Johnson. Julius 

.Tnhansen, Arvid 

Johanrsen, Geo. 

.Tarobsen. .Tohan 

.Tacobsen. Oscar 

.Tohnsen. Ernest 

.Tnhanson. Knut 

.Tnhnson. Jacob 

.Tnrsrensen, Agge 

Kallio. F. 

Krouss. Ernest 

Kristiansen 

Kruger. .1. 

T.arsen, Hans -1595 Tnbti. TTIalniar 

Tylunpstrom. Steen Tomis. F''ank 



Anderson, John 
Almkvist, Emll 
Corty, Casar 
Dobbin, Harry 
Doering, E. W. 
Englund, Gust E. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Iversen, Iver 
Johansson, Charles 



Line, Wiktor 
Melgail, M. 
Murphy, Daniel 
Nilsson. Teodor 
Nielsen, C. V. 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Paterson, John 
Pettersson, C. H. 
Voss. H. 
Johannsen, ChristianWhermann, William 
Karthauser, Otto Wilbrandt, Harry 
Linea, W. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



TjUwold. Nils 
T amb. Herbert 
Lof. 0.scar 
T>orentsen. .Tohn 
T,oo. E Van 
T.undgren. Carl 
T ntten. T. 
Markman. H. 



Valdlev. P. 
AVenikVe. A. 
"Wee. W. 
T^eiler. T. J. 
Wilkbelm. E. 
\rickstrnm. ^ntnn 
Zimmerman. This. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni, 
who has important news from home. 
Address, Mr.s. Minni TTall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Walter Jorgeson Clang-, born in 
Aaland Yetta, Ostro Yetta. is in- 
quired for by his uncle, John Clang. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Krislianson, who shipped on 
the Inirk "Xuanu" in September, 
1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden.— 5-13-14. 

Carl Julius Carlson, born in Swe- 
den in 1877, is inquired for by his 
mother. There is about $2000 due 
him from his father's estate. Last 
heard of in September, 1902, on the 
Atlantic Coast. Previously sailed on 
the "Clifford" between St. Johns and 
New York. Address Fru Sophia 
Carlson, Klubbegard, Hallands Lan. 
Heberg, Sweden. 

Samuel Dickson, a seaman, aged 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Willy Blunel, a native of Germany, 
is inquired for by his uncle. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify W. Stieglitz, Central Hotel, 
Hoboken, N. J.— 9-30-14. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON. Prop. 



Eweka, CaL, Letter List 



Ereksen, Anton 
Ellison, Sam 
Englund, Gust 
Hansen, Harald 
Hansen. Harry 
-1S27 (Photo) 



Haldorsen, Adolf 
Ingebrethsen, Alfred 
Lawrence, Harry 
Lomas, Richard 
Thorssen, Fred'k. N. 



NOTICE. 



The following named members of 
the crew of the "Santa Clara," who 
were on board of her at the time she 
picked up the "Roanoke," can get 
their salvage by calling on Attorney 
F. R. Wall, 324 Merchants' Ex- 
change: Seamen, George K. Bek- 
ker. Christen Christcnsen, Alf John- 
sen, E. Andersson, and H. Andrea- 
sen; firemen, J. Kotcharin and A. 
S. Casky; oiler, W. Kremer; waiters, 
C. Gibson and A. G. Clarke; first 
cook, J. Pitts; second cook, J. Mar- 
tin; third cook, W. E. Pitts; pantry- 
man, E. Andrews, and messboy R. 
Tennant. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6,. 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



Portland, Ore. 

wTTTohnTso^n 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Piione Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or -we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 

Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 
npRANlTs^^ 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 

Portland, Or., Lett€r List. 



Anderson, A. -1645 
Anderson, Gust. 

-1808 
Andresen, Anton 

-1635 
Andersen, Mike 
Bergman, Karl W. 
Berglund, Ed. 
Bjorkman, Chas. 
Brun, Mathiaa 
Bults, Ernest 
Bakkersen, Peter J. 
Carlsen, J. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Carlson, C. Erland 
Campbell, Frank 
Dahl, Henry 
Deswert, William 
Day, Aca 
Danielsen, Nils J. 
Edstrom, John 
Erman, A. 
Ekham, Frana 
England, E. 
Freitag, Franz 
Fristrom, S. 
Geiger, Josef 
Gordia, Piet 
Gynther, John 
Gravler, Eugene 
Greil, Ben 
Hansen, Max O. 
Henriksson, William 
Hellman, Albin 
Henricks, Woldemar 
Hedlund, Albert 
Holm, Aage 
Hunelg, Hans 
Hansen, H. F. C. C. 
Johansen, Chris 
Jansson, L. -2166 
Johansson, Arvo 
Jacobson, A. 



Karlson, August 
Kluge, Franli 
Kelly, Patrie 
Laine, Frank 
Darsen, John 
Lewik, Karl 
Dutzen, Wald. 
Mathson, Nils 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Maass, R. 
Meckerman, Ernest 
Marx, Thorwald 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Moberg, Karl 
Nelssen, C. J. 
Nilsson, Axel 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Narberg, John 
Olsen, Artliur 
Olsen, Ansgar 
Olson, J. W. 
Olsen, John Andreas 
Phillip, Max 
Petterson, Einar 
Peterson, Hans 
Petersson, M. 
Pettersson, W. H. 
Pelz, Gottfried 
Pohland, Max 
Petersen, John 
Raulio, Jacob 
Reincke, Herman 
Rhodes, F. 
Schmidt, Hans 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Slmeiis, O. E. 
Scott, James 
Schulz, Alfred 
Wieprecht, Ernest 
Welsen, J. 
Walter, John 
Woldhouse, John 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



€:^ 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 




ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, -1118 
Arnell, John 
Behn, Alfred 
Bowen, J. J. 
Butler, J. E. 
Bergman, L. J. 
Christensen, Albert 
Carlstrom, John 
Debus, F. 
de Lange, Ingolf 
Doyle, W. 
Ernandes, Frisco 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Forde, S. C. 
Graf, Otto 
Gronjos, Oswald 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Husche, H'y 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
Jacobson, Arthur 
Joliansen, Hans 
Johansen, A. H. 
Jeutaft, Sigurd 
Kallas, Alek 
Kristiansen, -1093 
Koski, Chas. 
Kustel, V. J. 
Loining, Hermand 
Lengtssen, Gottfried 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Larsen, Hans 
McLean, H. 
Martin, James 
Mackenzie, Hector 
G. 



Munsen, Fred 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nilsen, Alf. W. 
Oksanen, Juko 
Olsen, Oswald -1059 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olasen, Chas. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Pettersen, Olaf 
Peterson, Nels 
Ruridblad, Oscar 
Roberts, I. 
Sim, Gunder 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Sormato, Matti 
Strom, C. 
Schultz 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Vilen, T. 
Walder, Olsen N. 
Zebe, G. V. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgerisen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Solberg, Peter 
Stanners, W. S. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, both of Cleveland, Ohio, are 
inquired for by their sister, Laura 
Bickel. Anyone knowing their pres- 
ent whereabouts please notify Laura 
Bickel, 8817 Birkdalc avenue, Cleve- 
land, Ohio.— 10-21-14. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 

When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News ® Drug Co. 

Headquarters 
SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. WISKAH STREET, ABERDEEN 
SMOKE 

"ThinK of Me" and 
"White Squadron" 

CIGARS 

Made by 
L. L. MALEY, Aberdeen, Wash. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Headquarters for 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 
401 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

420i/'2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS. 



LEADING JEWELERS 



Have Moved to 

318 E. HERON STREET 

Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

ABERDEEN - - WASHINGTON 

Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Home News. 



Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 
1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delpliia. Pa. 

Charles Harold Allen, who has 
served as an apprentice in a British 
ship, age about 21 years, medium 
height, brown hair, last heard of in 
San Francisco November 9, 1911, is 
anxiously inquired for by his father. 
Please notify British Consul-General 
at San Francisco. 

I George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tonsberg, Norway, aged about SO, 
last heard of at Melbourne, >^ustralia, 
is inquiied for by his brother. Ad- 
dress, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue. Alameda, Cal. 



Prohibitionists carried Virginia by 
20,000 majority. Richmond voted 
4,287 for and 6,011 against. 

The discovery of a ninth satellite 
of Jupiter was announced by Pro- 
fessor S. B. Nicholson of the Lick 
Observatory ;it San Jose, California. 

James E. Ferguson, who will be 
next Governor of Texas, announces 
that although he does not believe 
Texas women want the ballot he is 
willing to submit to the voters a 
constitutional amendment allowing 
women to vote. 

That the citizens of Great Britain 
;irc not letting the war interfere with 
their plans for great industrial ex- 
hibits is shown by the arrival on the 
Krounds of the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition of several large 
sliiiMuents of British exhibits. These 
first ones to be received were shipped 
in September and consist of varnishes 
and many mining appliances. They 
are being installed in the Exposition 
exhibit palaces. 

Between 7, ()()() and 8,000 stenog- 
raphers and typists in New York 
City are out of employment. Many 
of these young women are on the 
verge of starvation. "Never since 
the stenographers and typists entered 
the field has such a condition pre- 
vailed," said a proprietor of a typists' 
exchange. The reason for so much 
unemployment is the shutting down 
of importing and exporting houses 
and firms connected with the Wall 
Street district. 

An order for 4,500 cavalry horses 
and mules has been placed with 
American dealers by representatives 
of the French Government. This is 
said to be tlie largest order for 
army horses received since the Boer 
war. The order, which is to be 
filled within the next ten days, will 
cost P'rance approximately $750,000. 
Eight representatives of the French 
Government, who made the purchase, 
declared they would remain here 
six weeks and were authorized to 
buy a total of 100,000 horses at an 
expenditure of about $12,000,000. 

Secretary of tlie Navy Daniels has 
begun an experiment in navy yard 
work by designating Captain George 
E. Burd as "industrial manager" of 
the New York yard. Rear-Admiral 
Lusher will remain commandant of 
the yard, with supreme authority, 
but will be relieved of the harassing 
details of the management of the 
5,000 workmen. He will devote him- 
self to purely naval questions. Cap- 
tain Burd is an engineering officer 
and has for some linic been in 
charge of the machine shop in the 
New York yard. If the experiment 
proves successful, construction of- 
ficers will be appointed for the other 
yards. 

Dropping 3(H) feet from a [irecipice, 
a twenty-ton boulder crushed down 
upon a flying Denver and Rio (irandc 
train eighteen miles east of Grand 
Junction October 11, killing three 
persons and seriously injuiinf.; four- 
teen more. The huge rock fell with 
such force that it crushed a steel 
car and pinioned a score of men, 
women and children passengers. A 
smaller boulder first descended, sev- 
ering the coupling between the en- 
gine tender and smoker. A second 
later the large rock fell, crashing 
through the car, and shattered it to 
bits. A large amount of wreckage 
was thrown into the Grand Ri\er, 
ten feet from the tracks. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Tlie Kiel Canal has been reopened 
for neutral vessels, but only a lim- 
ited number will be allowed at pres- 
ent to pass through. 

The South Manchuria Steamship 
Company, Dairen, has decided to 
start a South Sea service with the 
company's steamer "Hokoku Maru," 
5,000 tons, formerly the P. & O. 
steamer "Sunda," having Singapore 
as the base of operation. 

The shipping cleared at Antofa- 
gasta last year totaled 1,198 vessels, 
of 2,707,614 tons. This was an in- 
crease of 89 ships and 269,129 tons 
compared with 1912. British ships 
were first, numbering 361, of 1,110,- 
035 tons, and were followed by Ger- 
many, with 232 ships, of 818,552 ton.s. 

Two libels have been filed against 
the Austro-American steamship "Mar- 
tha Washington" in the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court by English firms which 
had supplied it with coal and pro- 
visions. The "Martha Washington" 
has been laid up at her pier at the 
Bush Docks since the outbreak of 
the war. 

The British battleship "Glory" ar- 
rived at Halifa.x Tuesday with the 
Spanish steamship "Monsterrat," on 
board of which were one hundred 
and fifty men, said to be Austrian 
and German reservists, in tow. The 
"Montserrat" steamed from New 
York Sept. 6 for Barcelona, Cadiz 
and Genoa. 

The "Indian Prince," sunk by the 
German converted cruiser "Kron- 
prinz Wilhelm," bound from Santos 
for New York with coflfee, was of 
2,846 tons gross, built in 1910 and 
owned by the Prince Line, Ltd., 
Newcastle. In addition, the "Moor- 
ish Prince," of the same line, 5,943 
tons gross, built in 1914, is reported 
to have been destroyed by cruisers. 
She was bound from Santos for New 
Orleans. 

England has asked Holland to give 
a guaranty that no cargo carried by 
Dutch boats shall ever reach Ger- 
many. This Holland refuses, hold- 
ing that no Government is required 
to give such a guaranty, but she 
has offered to England every facility 
♦o make investigations in Holland as 
to the bona fides of the Dutch con- 
signees, with a view to determining 
whether the ultimate destination of 
the supplies is Germany. There the 
matter rests with no decision reached. 
In the meantime many shipments of 
foodstuffs, which Holland needs for 
her ow-n consumption, are being 
shipped in the name of the Govern- 
ment, which is an adequate guaranty 
that they will not be sent to Ger- 
many. 

The "Bowes Castle," which was 
sunk August 18 by the German 
cruiser "Karlsruhe," 186 miles east 
of Barbadoes, was bound from Iqui- 
que to United States with a cargo 
of nitrate valued at about $400,000, 
the insurance of which against war 
risks had been effected alinost en- 
tirely in the United States. The 
steamer was valued at £50,000, being 
of 4,650 tons gross, built last year, 
and owned by Messrs. J. Chambers 
& Co., of Liverpool. These owners 
have consistently' insured their fleet 
against war risks year by year, the 
■ rates paid varying from ^ to J4 Per 
cent. The present policies were ef- 
fected from January 1 last at }i per 
cent., about £35.000 being covered 
on the "Bowes Castle" with compa- 
nies and Lloyd's, and the balance in 
the clubs. 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

52 EAST STREET, 0pp. Ferry Depot, San Francisco 
JOE WEISS Telephone Kearny 3771 

Union Made Shoes 

FOR MEN EXCLUSIVELY 

NEW STORE! NEW GOODSI 

NEW MACHINERY! 

Call and Inspect our new up-to-date quarters 

Repairing done while you wait by the latest machinery 

Work called for and delivered 

We use only the best leather market affords 

We can save you money by purchasing your next pair of shoes from us. 





Phone Douglas 198 



UNION LABEL USED 



NOVELTY TAILORING CO. 

Third Floor Phelan Building 
760 MARKET STREET 



WORKSHOP CUTTING DEFT. SALES DEFT. 

Room 325 Room 327 Room 329 

Represented by F. SELANDER, Assistant Secretary 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abbops, Arne 
Aboli'n, Chris. 
I Adolfsson, F. H. 
I Ahl, Theo 
'Ahlstrom, Elis 
I Albertson, Chris 
Andersen, A. 
I Anderson, Anton 
Andersen, Henry 
Andersen. Nela 
Andersen, Peter 
Anderson, Edvard 



Anderson, Hilding 
Anderson. .Johannes 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, S. M. 
Anderson, Wm. 
Anderssen. H. -1477 
Anderssen. S. P. 
Andreassen, Morgan 
Antonsen, Herman 
Arntsen, John 
Aspe, Teddy 



Anderson, Emanuel Athanassele, 



Ernst 



Michael 
Attel. Alf 
Austin. Tom 
Bjorseth, Knut 
Blucker, John 
Boers, M. 
Borgen, John 
Bowman, William G. 
Brander, William 
Brown, S. 
Bryan, John 
Bryning, W. 
Brynjulfson. Halvar 
Burndez, Charles 



Anderson 

-1941 
Anderson, F. 
Baardsen, F. 
Baars. Hans 
Backman. Paul 
Bauer. Andrew 
Beck Johannes 
Behr, H. 
Beimeir, Peter 
Benfield, Charly 
Benson, Gus 
Benson. Severin 
Berg, John 

Berghalm. Edward Buse, D. 
Berlin. Werner Bye, Sigurd 

Bertelsen. Alf. 
lijorkstrom. Arthur 
Gallon, Josh. 
Campbell. Geo. 
Cariera, Pete 
Carlson, A. A. 
Carlson, Charley 
Carlson, H. 
Carlson, John 
Carlson, P. S. 
Carry. Peter A. 
Carter, Sidney 
Christensen, Albert 



Bynum, Joe 

Christiansen, L. P. 
Classen, Henry 
Clausen, Chr. 
Coakley, John 
Cockell, Rrank 
Connolly, Stephen 
Contreras, Julius 
Cordia, P. 
Costa, Casimiro 
Crosman, Geo. 



Dahlin, O. W. 

Dalen, Wm. K. 

Daubbs, Paul 

Davis, Frank A. 

Davis, Gala 

Debus, Fredrick 

Dempsey, H. 

Des Hayes, F. 

Eaton. William H. Elone. Ennanual 

Eby. Ivar. D. 



Deswert, William 
Digman. Carl A. 
Dixon. John 
Dowda. C. W. 
Dowe, John 
Dreyer, Carl 
Duval, Bennett 



Ehlert, Ernest 
Kinardt. John 
Elenius, A. 
Elfstrom, Axel 
Ellis, E. 

Ellsworth. James 
Elofson, John 
Farnen, M. S. 
Finn, Chas. 
Fitzpatrick, P. 

Gaby, Jim 
Gasch, William 
Gerner, Hans 
Giortz. Petrus V. 
Gjars. Petrus 
Gjasdal. Elling 
Gordon, Geo. 



English, John 
Eriksen, Bernhard 
Erikson, E. 
Erikson. G. 
Ervin, Arthur H. 
Eskildsen, Lars B. 
Eskildsen, Nils P. 
Evans. S. C. 
Praser, Thomas 
Freiberg, P. 
French, Jack 

Grlfall, Peter D. 
Griffin. Jas. 
Grigoleit. Ed. 
Gronnevlck. Isack 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gundersen, K. -899 
Gustafson. Gus 



Granstrom. Nestar Gustman. Leo 



Gravit. Carl 

Greame, William 

Haave, Norvald 

Hafgaard. Hans 

Haggar, Fred 

Hall. S. C. 

Hallen. Victor 

Halvarsen, H. 

Halvorsen. Olaf 

Hammargren. Oscar Henry, H. A 



Gutman, Charles 

Hedlund. Olaf 
Hein, Mike 
Heldal. Trygve 
Helpap. August 
Helin. Paul 
Helinius, Oscar 
Henrickson, Chas. 



Hank. A. E. 
Hannus, Alex 
Hanson. Bernhard 
Hansen, C. T. 
Hansen, E. 
Hansen, J. -2156 
Hansen, Marlus 
Hansen. Olaf 
Hansen. Oscar 
Hansen. Thomas 
Hansen. W. H. C. 
Harmening. Fred 
Haskins. C. 
Haws. Arthur 
Heckel, Max 



Hensen, J. 
Hewitt. Peter 
Hiks. Gustav 
Hilke. Karl 
Hoffman. Jack 
Hogan, A. 
Hogelund Andrew 
Holdin. F. 
Hollman. Martin 
Holm, S. 
Hoist. R. 
Hovring. H. J. 
Hultberg, Ernest 
Hubner. C. F. W. 
Hyde, Carl 



Ikivalko 
Illig, Gus 
Jacobsen, John 
Jacobsen, Martin 
Jamlsch, EM W. 
Jensen, Fredrick 
Jensen, Halvor 
Jensen, C. 
Jensen, Carl 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Harry 
Jensen, Just 
Jensen, William 
Jersch, Wilhelm 
Johannesen, Einar 
Johannessen, Anton 
Johannessen. John 
Johansen. Alf. 
Johansen, Eduard 
Johansen, Johan 
Johansen, I^ouis 
Johanson. Nathanael 
Johansson, A. 
Kaktin. Ed 
Kalkin, Fred 
Kallio, Frana 
Kallos. Alex. 
Kalnin, E. 
Kalrsman, E. 
Kappe. A. 
Kargen. Fred 
Karlsen, Martin 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Kayser, C. T. 
Kearns, N. 
Keating, R. 

Lacy, Thos. E. 
Lange, P. 
Lapschies. Edward 
Larsen, Alf 
Laren, A. D. 
Larsen, Anton 
I^arsen, Georg L. 
Larsen. Hans 
Larsen, Ludvig J. 
Larson, C. 
Larson, H. P. 
Larssen, Alfred 
Larsson, K. E. 
Leckscher, Henry 
-1684 

Macrae. Alexander 
Malmstrom, C. A. 
MalttI, J. 

Mardisan, Andrew 
Markley, Paul 
Markman. Harry 
Markmann. Heinrich 
Martenz, Paul -2262 
Martens, H., -1892 
Martens, Paul 
Masters, C. 
Martensen. I. C.-2191 
Mathisen. Christian 
Matsen, H. 
Matson. O. -2046 
Mayes. J. B. 
McConnell, David 
McKeating, R. 

Nagel, Alf 
Nelsen, Victor 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson. W. 
Nicholson, F. E. 
Nielsen, Harold J. 
Nielsen, Ingolf 
Nielsen, L. 
Oaks, Theo. K. 
O'Connor. W. F. 
Ohlsson, E. V. 
Olmann, P. 
Olsen, Alfred 
Olsen. Ferdinand 
Olsen, Gus 
Olsen, Olal 
Olsen, O. -1283 
Olsen, Otto 
Olsen. Oswald 
Olsen. Peter 
Olsen, Siegfried 
Olsen, William 

Palm, A. 
Palmer, P. 
Pappe. G. F. 
Parrell. William 
Parson. Herman 
Paulson. Alex. 
Paultin. M.artln 
Pearson. Victor 
Pedersen. Carl 
Pedersen. Hans 
Pedersen. O. -1392 
Pedersen, Walter G 
Pederson. Sofus R. 
Peters. J. 
Petersen, -1564 
Petersen. John A. 
Quigley, R. E. 



Isakson, Karl 

Johnsen. Ole 
Johnsen, G. -950 
Johnson, A. R. 
Johnson, Asmund 
Johnson, D. 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Elnar 
Johnson, — 
Johnson, F. -1723 
Johnson, .F. 
Johnson, Gus 
Johnson, H. -2213 
Johnson, Pete 
Johnson, Robert 
Johnson. Stefon 
Johnston. W. 
Jonson. Halvar 
Jokstad. Sigurd O. 
Jones, Berthon 
Jordan, O. 

Kenny, James 
Kesher, R. 
Kindlund, Otto 

Kine, Conrad 
Klette, Ernst 
Klingstrom, G. G. 
Kohne, Ernst 
Kolberg, Arvid 
Konopacki, Martin 
Kristiansen. L. P. 
Kroeger, Henry 
Krutman, K. 
Kuhn. John 

Lee. Ernest 
Lewis George 
Lewis. Roy B. 
Lidsten, Chas. 
Llndelop, Charles 
Lindner, J. -1750 
Lindgren, Richard 
Line, W. 
Llnhquist, G. 
Lohne. E. 
Ludwig, Edmund 
Lundberg. Torsten 
Lund. Pete 
Lynch, James 

McMahon, J. T. 
McMalo, Victor 
Mechan, Frank 
Merlult, Gaston 
Meyer, Frank 
Miller, Herman 
Moberg, A. W. 
^Mogelberg, Harry 
Monsen, Martin 
Moore, C. C. 
Morris. Benjamin 
Morrison, Wm. 
Moure. Peter 
Mueller, A. R. 
Muirohneek, W. 
Muller, Fred 
Murray, C. P. 
Murray, Edward 

Nielsen, N. C. 
Nlemeyer, Oscar 
Nllson, Ragnard 
Nilsson, Johan -937 
Nilsson. -1141 
Nurken, H. 
Nurml, Victor R. 
Nyman, A. 

Olson, Geo. W. 
Olson, James 
Olson, Machtal 
Olson, M. 
Olson, Marius 
Olson, S. 
Olson, Sam 
Olsson. G. B. 
Ondrasek, Ralph 
Osalin, Oscar 
Osman, T. B. 
Osterhoff, Holnrlch 
Ovarnstrom, H. 

Petersen, S. A. 
Petersson, A. -1436 
Peter.sson, Chas. 

-1901 
Pettersen, F. -1526 
Pettersson, Adolf 

-1622 
Pettersen. Karl 
Petz. Fritz 
Powhland. M. 
Pillson. Eduard 
Porath, Ben 
Prannels. W. 
Prinz, Carl 
Punls. Antony 



Raalsen. Fred 
Rasmussen, Andrew 
Raymond, Frank L. 
Uedinger, M. 
Reed, J. W. 
Regan. John 
Richardson. E. O. 
Richter, Niels 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Rivera, Ben 
Saarinen, Werner 
Sager, Ed. 
Salilman, Chas. 
Salger. Julius 
Salvesen, S. 
Sancherd, Vincent 
Sandblom, K. 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sandstrom, O. H . 
Santos, Ben 
Schaffer. Hugo 
Scheffler, Samuel 
Schmell, F. A. 
Schmidt, Berhard 
Schmidt, Louis 
Srhulz. Robert 
Schuize, Paul 
S<ott, Emit 
Seidel, Willi 
Shallgreen, John 
Shem, A. 
Sherry, J. H. 
Shields, J. J. 
Skogman, W. A. 
Slenning, Joseph 
T.Tmman, Krispln 
Tammila, Valno 
Tasnase, E. 



Roberts, John 
Robinsboom, E. 
Rose, Wm. H. 
Rosenblad, Axel 
Rosenquist, A. 
Rulse, — 
Rundquist, O. 
Rutte, Peter 
Ryersen, Geo. 

Smalmberg, Otto 
Smith, D. 
Smith, Percy S. 
Snell. Adolf 
Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Sorby, Olaf 
Sorensen, C. J. T. G. 
Sorensen. Peter 
Spooner, Emil 
Stallbaum, Eberhard 
Strasdln. Hans 
Stratten. Harry 
Strauss. Walter 
Strom. Kahl 
Swansen, O. 
Swanson, Ben 
Swanson, Jack 
Swanson, John 
Swansson. Oskar 
Swartley, Norman 
Sundl, Oscar 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundharm, Fred 
Sundhouse, Joe 

Thompson. Thomas 

Thoren, Gus 

Ticksman. Chas. 

Tlgersen, Tom 

Tollefsen. Hans 

Tuchel, Gustav 

Vesgaard, Jens 
,Veeg, Frank 
Viig. Theodore 
Voorhles, Firman 
Wlllert, Charles 
Williams, — 
Williams, John 
Winblad, Martin 
Wilsen, Billy 
Wimmer. Geo. 
Winter, Harry 
Wirta, John 
Wirtman, John 
Wortman, Wm. 



Thearin, John E. 
Thomas. Edward 
Thompson, E. 
Udekull, C. 
Vanderberg. Geo. 
Van Katwijk, J. W 
Velson. Frank 
Verfard, Frank 
Wagner, W. 
Waldhouse, John 
Wallgren, I. M. 
Walsh, B. 
Wanderlid. J. 
Welson, R. 
Welure. J. 
Westgaard, John 
White, Fred 
Wihack. Walter 
WiUe, Max 

Zammerling, Fred Zirnbauer, Karl 
Zankert, Karl Zornlg, Harry 

Zechel, Walter Zwakten, Rudolph 

PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Anderson, A. Knappe, Ad. 

Anderson, Andrew Laas, J. 

Anderson, Axel Laydon. D. 
Athanasele, DemetreMehrtens, H. K. 

Beling, Oscar Miles, I. P. 

Carter, H. Olsen, Arne 

Ceelan, John Olsen, Carl -1101 

Christoftersen, Olaf Olsen, Marinus 



Ellefsen, Otto 
Erikson, E. 
Finnelly. Wm. 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen. Marlus 
Hendriksen, Hag- 

bart 
Hill. John 
Hoffman, J. 
Iversen. Iver 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johansen, Emil 
Johnson, R. W. 
Jorgensen. OIuv 
Klette, E. F. 



Olsen. W. S. -1229 
Raasch, O. 
Rarly. Frans. 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rathke, Relnhold 
Relursen. A. L. 
Roslin. Robert 
Ruter. Peter 
Schroder, Aug. 
Sorensen, Pete 
Summers, J. J. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Wakely. R. E. 
Walters. Albert B. 
Wurthman. W. L. 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hali Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcad«ro & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clay St. 

TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET, near l«arket 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

. (THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 
526 CALIFORNIA STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of tlie Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco.) 

Tlie following Branches for Receipt and 
Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere street. 

June 30, 1914: 

Assets $58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

For the six months ending June 30, 
1914, a dividend to depositors of 4% per 
annum was declared. 

Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. ' Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 



HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 
GOODS, ETC. 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 

Phone Garfield 7833 E. Benvenuti, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: .25, .30 
and .50 per day. $1.25 per Week and 
up. Special rates for Housekeeping, 

Single or Connecting Rooms. 
This Place Must Be Seen to Be Appre- 
ciated. Nothing Like It In the City. 

1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



ll'' 

Ifnion 

MADE 



Beer 




\ 
T^le 

AND 

Porter 



^3>r> Of America Jc^ 

COPYRIGHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



g> IV M ^^"V W^y^ T^^ T"^^ ^T^ S^^ that this label (in light 
^^ I V/ 1 C J 1^. r^^i'^^^b^"^) appears on the box in 
V>^AV*'^ww^m"»-»— 4*-^ **-^which yod are served. 



Issued by Auinofityof uie Cigar Maners' Imetnatjonal Union of Anterica 

Union-made Cigars. 

(JhiS (Jfrtiftf? TWltanj^coooredlntWiWhrnbemBrtbirtlld-CUKTOIWl 
a MmCRor IHt ogar mmeio 'ihiuimtiowil uwoiirf Auricj, u\ atuiotkm devoted In the 10- 

MnctBoiiiilrttMORAiMATBWjtMfiliTUlIcnmWlUAfltOfMtSAn. ntiwUmm mnmi ii 



Uie» CigifS tD 111 siDAen UimMhout Uw MXld 



»«• siaiu 



V CitrUel 






JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

M. WICKS 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

60 STEUART STREET 

San Francisco 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
OfHce Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 

DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 5390 

ANCHOR HOUSE 



S. PETERSON, Prop. 



495 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

J. MILLER 

Seamen's Outfitter 
Union Made Goods 

General Merchandise 



Suits Steam-Cleaned $1.50 
I'hf.nc Sutter 767 124 EAST ST. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



RED SEAL CIGAR CO., NANUPACTURERS 



133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"EL 




M 



Clear Havana Cigars 
of Highest Type 

UNION MADE 

ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Albertsen, Hans 

Christian 
Andersen, E. W. 
Andersen, Gus 
Boers, J. G. 
Bloom, A. A. 
Bernhard, Oscar 
Colbert, M. J. 
Cohn, W. R. 
Erickson, Earl 
Bricksen, O. K. 
Kindlay, J. 
Hans, Nick 
Herno, Fred 
Hallen, Victor 
Happmer, H. 



Jacona, Carmelo 
Janssan, Axel 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson, John E. 
Kathy, Albert 
Lundquist, Fritz 
Magnussen, Mngruis 
Nieman, August 
Olson, John 
Orabrovae 
Petersen, Chas. F. 
Roelfs, J. 
Roelfs, J. 
Rinta. Carl 
Schultz, F. J. 
Wallen, E. 



Seattle, Wash. 



Abolln, Adam 
Borgen, K. Sigurd- 
sen 
Dahl, Ben. 
Flster, Johannes 
Flnnlgan. I. H. 
Hagen, Gunder 
Jensen, Gustav 
Johansen, Ingvald 
Johnson, Axel 
Nelson, Nels Wll- 

helm 
Larsen, Fred 
Magnuson, P. A. 



Osterlund, Albert 
Olsson, Sigfrld 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phlster, Albert 
Polhome, Mr. 
RIdderstaff. Ernest 
Rye, F. M. J. 
Selback, Chris. 
Sllnning, R"omus C) 
Spellman, Tom 
Starks, John 
Stein, George G. 
Stlxrud, Jack 
Stromsness, Oscar 



News from Abroad. 



It was officially announced that 
tlu- British cruiser "Hawke" has 
been sunk in the North Sea by a 
German submarine. Out of a crew 
of 400 men, approximately fifty were 
saved. 

The French and German Ciovern- 
ments are arranging through Wash- 
ington for the exchange of prisoners 
of war. A dispatch from Paris says